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Gallery: TG.com at the Tour de Corse

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    If
    you’ve not guessed already, we’ve been at the Corsican round of the European
    Rally Championship this weekend, following the stellar field of LMP1 drivers,
    former F1 stars, and rallying heroes.

    And
    the perilous rally of 10,000 curves didn’t fail to deliver. Won by
    Bryan Bouffier driving his 2017 Super 2000 car, who shocked the rallying world
    with a surprise win at Monte Carlo in 2011, it was also Peugeot’s first
    international rally title since Thierry Neuville won in 2011 at Sanremo.

    It was a close fought battle between Bouffier and ERC leader,
    Jan Kopecky, who’s driving for Skoda. Just before midday service, the
    FabiaS2000 had established a healthy lead over Bouffier who’d been dominating
    the previous day. But Kopecky’s car suffered engine woes on the last stage,
    leaving no choice but to limp to the finish line – and second place - on three
     cylinders.

    Another hopeful for a Championship win was Craig Breen in
    his Sainteloc Peugeot, who’d set the pace early in the rally. But a
    puncture put paid to his efforts, and he was left to fight with Toyota Le Mans
    driver, Stephane Sarrazin, for third place.

    Sarrazin’s Mini had form at the rally – it was the very car that
    won in 2012, and the Frenchman was able to jostle Breen off the podium and take
     third.

    Ex-F1 star, Robert Kubica (read our exclusive chat with Top Gear
    Man of the Year 2012 here
    ), was forced to retire after a fueling problem in his
    Citroen DS3.  

    Want
    more rallying action? Read our passenger ride with Kris Meeke here, and check
    out the corner that killed Group B rallying
    .

    Here
    are the final results:

    Pos 
    Driver              
    Team/Car             Time/Gap

     1. Bryan
    Bouffier        Delta
    Peugeot        2h41m58.2s

     2. Jan
    Kopecky          
    Skoda               
    + 39.8s

     3. Stephane Sarrazin     First
    Mini           + 1m37.6s

     4. Craig
    Breen           Sainteloc
    Peugeot    + 1m40.8s

     5. Francois Delecour     Kronos
    Peugeot       + 3m25.0s

     6. Julien
    Maurin        
    Ford                
    + 3m37.6s

     7. Andreas
    Aigner        Stohl
    Subaru         + 7m53.9s

     8. Jean-Mathieu Leandri  Sainteloc
    Peugeot    + 8m47.8s

     9. Germain Bonnefis     
    Renault              +
     9m16.8s

    10. Jean Michel Raoux     Delta
    Peugeot        + 13m54.3s

    Photography: Rowan Horncastle

  2. If you’ve not guessed already, we’ve been at the Corsican round of the European Rally Championship this weekend, following the stellar field of LMP1 drivers, former F1 stars, and rallying heroes.

    And the perilous rally of 10,000 curves didn’t fail to deliver. Won by Bryan Bouffier driving his 2017 Super 2000 car, who shocked the rallying world with a surprise win at Monte Carlo in 2011, it was also Peugeot’s first international rally title since Thierry Neuville won in 2011 at Sanremo.

    It was a close fought battle between Bouffier and ERC leader, Jan Kopecky, who’s driving for Skoda. Just before midday service, the FabiaS2000 had established a healthy lead over Bouffier who’d been dominating the previous day. But Kopecky’s car suffered engine woes on the last stage, leaving no choice but to limp to the finish line – and second place - on three cylinders.

    Another hopeful for a Championship win was Craig Breen in his Sainteloc Peugeot, who’d set the pace early in the rally. But a puncture put paid to his efforts, and he was left to fight with Toyota Le Mans driver, Stephane Sarrazin, for third place.

    Sarrazin’s Mini had form at the rally – it was the very car that won in 2012, and the Frenchman was able to jostle Breen off the podium and take third.

    Ex-F1 star, Robert Kubica (read our exclusive chat with Top Gear Man of the Year 2012 here), was forced to retire after a fueling problem in his Citroen DS3.  

    Want more rallying action? Read our passenger ride with Kris Meeke here, and check out the corner that killed Group B rallying.

    Here are the final results:

    Pos  Driver               Team/Car             Time/Gap

     1. Bryan Bouffier        Delta Peugeot        2h41m58.2s

     2. Jan Kopecky           Skoda                + 39.8s

     3. Stephane Sarrazin     First Mini           + 1m37.6s

     4. Craig Breen           Sainteloc Peugeot    + 1m40.8s

     5. Francois Delecour     Kronos Peugeot       + 3m25.0s

     6. Julien Maurin         Ford                 + 3m37.6s

     7. Andreas Aigner        Stohl Subaru         + 7m53.9s

     8. Jean-Mathieu Leandri  Sainteloc Peugeot    + 8m47.8s

     9. Germain Bonnefis      Renault              + 9m16.8s

    10. Jean Michel Raoux     Delta Peugeot        + 13m54.3s

    Photography: Rowan Horncastle

  3. If you’ve not guessed already, we’ve been at the Corsican round of the European Rally Championship this weekend, following the stellar field of LMP1 drivers, former F1 stars, and rallying heroes.

    And the perilous rally of 10,000 curves didn’t fail to deliver. Won by Bryan Bouffier driving his 2017 Super 2000 car, who shocked the rallying world with a surprise win at Monte Carlo in 2011, it was also Peugeot’s first international rally title since Thierry Neuville won in 2011 at Sanremo.

    It was a close fought battle between Bouffier and ERC leader, Jan Kopecky, who’s driving for Skoda. Just before midday service, the FabiaS2000 had established a healthy lead over Bouffier who’d been dominating the previous day. But Kopecky’s car suffered engine woes on the last stage, leaving no choice but to limp to the finish line – and second place - on three cylinders.

    Another hopeful for a Championship win was Craig Breen in his Sainteloc Peugeot, who’d set the pace early in the rally. But a puncture put paid to his efforts, and he was left to fight with Toyota Le Mans driver, Stephane Sarrazin, for third place.

    Sarrazin’s Mini had form at the rally – it was the very car that won in 2012, and the Frenchman was able to jostle Breen off the podium and take third.

    Ex-F1 star, Robert Kubica (read our exclusive chat with Top Gear Man of the Year 2012 here), was forced to retire after a fueling problem in his Citroen DS3.  

    Want more rallying action? Read our passenger ride with Kris Meeke here, and check out the corner that killed Group B rallying.

    Here are the final results:

    Pos  Driver               Team/Car             Time/Gap

     1. Bryan Bouffier        Delta Peugeot        2h41m58.2s

     2. Jan Kopecky           Skoda                + 39.8s

     3. Stephane Sarrazin     First Mini           + 1m37.6s

     4. Craig Breen           Sainteloc Peugeot    + 1m40.8s

     5. Francois Delecour     Kronos Peugeot       + 3m25.0s

     6. Julien Maurin         Ford                 + 3m37.6s

     7. Andreas Aigner        Stohl Subaru         + 7m53.9s

     8. Jean-Mathieu Leandri  Sainteloc Peugeot    + 8m47.8s

     9. Germain Bonnefis      Renault              + 9m16.8s

    10. Jean Michel Raoux     Delta Peugeot        + 13m54.3s

    Photography: Rowan Horncastle

  4. If you’ve not guessed already, we’ve been at the Corsican round of the European Rally Championship this weekend, following the stellar field of LMP1 drivers, former F1 stars, and rallying heroes.

    And the perilous rally of 10,000 curves didn’t fail to deliver. Won by Bryan Bouffier driving his 2017 Super 2000 car, who shocked the rallying world with a surprise win at Monte Carlo in 2011, it was also Peugeot’s first international rally title since Thierry Neuville won in 2011 at Sanremo.

    It was a close fought battle between Bouffier and ERC leader, Jan Kopecky, who’s driving for Skoda. Just before midday service, the FabiaS2000 had established a healthy lead over Bouffier who’d been dominating the previous day. But Kopecky’s car suffered engine woes on the last stage, leaving no choice but to limp to the finish line – and second place - on three cylinders.

    Another hopeful for a Championship win was Craig Breen in his Sainteloc Peugeot, who’d set the pace early in the rally. But a puncture put paid to his efforts, and he was left to fight with Toyota Le Mans driver, Stephane Sarrazin, for third place.

    Sarrazin’s Mini had form at the rally – it was the very car that won in 2012, and the Frenchman was able to jostle Breen off the podium and take third.

    Ex-F1 star, Robert Kubica (read our exclusive chat with Top Gear Man of the Year 2012 here), was forced to retire after a fueling problem in his Citroen DS3.  

    Want more rallying action? Read our passenger ride with Kris Meeke here, and check out the corner that killed Group B rallying.

    Here are the final results:

    Pos  Driver               Team/Car             Time/Gap

     1. Bryan Bouffier        Delta Peugeot        2h41m58.2s

     2. Jan Kopecky           Skoda                + 39.8s

     3. Stephane Sarrazin     First Mini           + 1m37.6s

     4. Craig Breen           Sainteloc Peugeot    + 1m40.8s

     5. Francois Delecour     Kronos Peugeot       + 3m25.0s

     6. Julien Maurin         Ford                 + 3m37.6s

     7. Andreas Aigner        Stohl Subaru         + 7m53.9s

     8. Jean-Mathieu Leandri  Sainteloc Peugeot    + 8m47.8s

     9. Germain Bonnefis      Renault              + 9m16.8s

    10. Jean Michel Raoux     Delta Peugeot        + 13m54.3s

    Photography: Rowan Horncastle

  5. If you’ve not guessed already, we’ve been at the Corsican round of the European Rally Championship this weekend, following the stellar field of LMP1 drivers, former F1 stars, and rallying heroes.

    And the perilous rally of 10,000 curves didn’t fail to deliver. Won by Bryan Bouffier driving his 2017 Super 2000 car, who shocked the rallying world with a surprise win at Monte Carlo in 2011, it was also Peugeot’s first international rally title since Thierry Neuville won in 2011 at Sanremo.

    It was a close fought battle between Bouffier and ERC leader, Jan Kopecky, who’s driving for Skoda. Just before midday service, the FabiaS2000 had established a healthy lead over Bouffier who’d been dominating the previous day. But Kopecky’s car suffered engine woes on the last stage, leaving no choice but to limp to the finish line – and second place - on three cylinders.

    Another hopeful for a Championship win was Craig Breen in his Sainteloc Peugeot, who’d set the pace early in the rally. But a puncture put paid to his efforts, and he was left to fight with Toyota Le Mans driver, Stephane Sarrazin, for third place.

    Sarrazin’s Mini had form at the rally – it was the very car that won in 2012, and the Frenchman was able to jostle Breen off the podium and take third.

    Ex-F1 star, Robert Kubica (read our exclusive chat with Top Gear Man of the Year 2012 here), was forced to retire after a fueling problem in his Citroen DS3.  

    Want more rallying action? Read our passenger ride with Kris Meeke here, and check out the corner that killed Group B rallying.

    Here are the final results:

    Pos  Driver               Team/Car             Time/Gap

     1. Bryan Bouffier        Delta Peugeot        2h41m58.2s

     2. Jan Kopecky           Skoda                + 39.8s

     3. Stephane Sarrazin     First Mini           + 1m37.6s

     4. Craig Breen           Sainteloc Peugeot    + 1m40.8s

     5. Francois Delecour     Kronos Peugeot       + 3m25.0s

     6. Julien Maurin         Ford                 + 3m37.6s

     7. Andreas Aigner        Stohl Subaru         + 7m53.9s

     8. Jean-Mathieu Leandri  Sainteloc Peugeot    + 8m47.8s

     9. Germain Bonnefis      Renault              + 9m16.8s

    10. Jean Michel Raoux     Delta Peugeot        + 13m54.3s

    Photography: Rowan Horncastle

  6. If you’ve not guessed already, we’ve been at the Corsican round of the European Rally Championship this weekend, following the stellar field of LMP1 drivers, former F1 stars, and rallying heroes.

    And the perilous rally of 10,000 curves didn’t fail to deliver. Won by Bryan Bouffier driving his 2017 Super 2000 car, who shocked the rallying world with a surprise win at Monte Carlo in 2011, it was also Peugeot’s first international rally title since Thierry Neuville won in 2011 at Sanremo.

    It was a close fought battle between Bouffier and ERC leader, Jan Kopecky, who’s driving for Skoda. Just before midday service, the FabiaS2000 had established a healthy lead over Bouffier who’d been dominating the previous day. But Kopecky’s car suffered engine woes on the last stage, leaving no choice but to limp to the finish line – and second place - on three cylinders.

    Another hopeful for a Championship win was Craig Breen in his Sainteloc Peugeot, who’d set the pace early in the rally. But a puncture put paid to his efforts, and he was left to fight with Toyota Le Mans driver, Stephane Sarrazin, for third place.

    Sarrazin’s Mini had form at the rally – it was the very car that won in 2012, and the Frenchman was able to jostle Breen off the podium and take third.

    Ex-F1 star, Robert Kubica (read our exclusive chat with Top Gear Man of the Year 2012 here), was forced to retire after a fueling problem in his Citroen DS3.  

    Want more rallying action? Read our passenger ride with Kris Meeke here, and check out the corner that killed Group B rallying.

    Here are the final results:

    Pos  Driver               Team/Car             Time/Gap

     1. Bryan Bouffier        Delta Peugeot        2h41m58.2s

     2. Jan Kopecky           Skoda                + 39.8s

     3. Stephane Sarrazin     First Mini           + 1m37.6s

     4. Craig Breen           Sainteloc Peugeot    + 1m40.8s

     5. Francois Delecour     Kronos Peugeot       + 3m25.0s

     6. Julien Maurin         Ford                 + 3m37.6s

     7. Andreas Aigner        Stohl Subaru         + 7m53.9s

     8. Jean-Mathieu Leandri  Sainteloc Peugeot    + 8m47.8s

     9. Germain Bonnefis      Renault              + 9m16.8s

    10. Jean Michel Raoux     Delta Peugeot        + 13m54.3s

    Photography: Rowan Horncastle

  7. If you’ve not guessed already, we’ve been at the Corsican round of the European Rally Championship this weekend, following the stellar field of LMP1 drivers, former F1 stars, and rallying heroes.

    And the perilous rally of 10,000 curves didn’t fail to deliver. Won by Bryan Bouffier driving his 2017 Super 2000 car, who shocked the rallying world with a surprise win at Monte Carlo in 2011, it was also Peugeot’s first international rally title since Thierry Neuville won in 2011 at Sanremo.

    It was a close fought battle between Bouffier and ERC leader, Jan Kopecky, who’s driving for Skoda. Just before midday service, the FabiaS2000 had established a healthy lead over Bouffier who’d been dominating the previous day. But Kopecky’s car suffered engine woes on the last stage, leaving no choice but to limp to the finish line – and second place - on three cylinders.

    Another hopeful for a Championship win was Craig Breen in his Sainteloc Peugeot, who’d set the pace early in the rally. But a puncture put paid to his efforts, and he was left to fight with Toyota Le Mans driver, Stephane Sarrazin, for third place.

    Sarrazin’s Mini had form at the rally – it was the very car that won in 2012, and the Frenchman was able to jostle Breen off the podium and take third.

    Ex-F1 star, Robert Kubica (read our exclusive chat with Top Gear Man of the Year 2012 here), was forced to retire after a fueling problem in his Citroen DS3.  

    Want more rallying action? Read our passenger ride with Kris Meeke here, and check out the corner that killed Group B rallying.

    Here are the final results:

    Pos  Driver               Team/Car             Time/Gap

     1. Bryan Bouffier        Delta Peugeot        2h41m58.2s

     2. Jan Kopecky           Skoda                + 39.8s

     3. Stephane Sarrazin     First Mini           + 1m37.6s

     4. Craig Breen           Sainteloc Peugeot    + 1m40.8s

     5. Francois Delecour     Kronos Peugeot       + 3m25.0s

     6. Julien Maurin         Ford                 + 3m37.6s

     7. Andreas Aigner        Stohl Subaru         + 7m53.9s

     8. Jean-Mathieu Leandri  Sainteloc Peugeot    + 8m47.8s

     9. Germain Bonnefis      Renault              + 9m16.8s

    10. Jean Michel Raoux     Delta Peugeot        + 13m54.3s

    Photography: Rowan Horncastle

  8. If you’ve not guessed already, we’ve been at the Corsican round of the European Rally Championship this weekend, following the stellar field of LMP1 drivers, former F1 stars, and rallying heroes.

    And the perilous rally of 10,000 curves didn’t fail to deliver. Won by Bryan Bouffier driving his 2017 Super 2000 car, who shocked the rallying world with a surprise win at Monte Carlo in 2011, it was also Peugeot’s first international rally title since Thierry Neuville won in 2011 at Sanremo.

    It was a close fought battle between Bouffier and ERC leader, Jan Kopecky, who’s driving for Skoda. Just before midday service, the FabiaS2000 had established a healthy lead over Bouffier who’d been dominating the previous day. But Kopecky’s car suffered engine woes on the last stage, leaving no choice but to limp to the finish line – and second place - on three cylinders.

    Another hopeful for a Championship win was Craig Breen in his Sainteloc Peugeot, who’d set the pace early in the rally. But a puncture put paid to his efforts, and he was left to fight with Toyota Le Mans driver, Stephane Sarrazin, for third place.

    Sarrazin’s Mini had form at the rally – it was the very car that won in 2012, and the Frenchman was able to jostle Breen off the podium and take third.

    Ex-F1 star, Robert Kubica (read our exclusive chat with Top Gear Man of the Year 2012 here), was forced to retire after a fueling problem in his Citroen DS3.  

    Want more rallying action? Read our passenger ride with Kris Meeke here, and check out the corner that killed Group B rallying.

    Here are the final results:

    Pos  Driver               Team/Car             Time/Gap

     1. Bryan Bouffier        Delta Peugeot        2h41m58.2s

     2. Jan Kopecky           Skoda                + 39.8s

     3. Stephane Sarrazin     First Mini           + 1m37.6s

     4. Craig Breen           Sainteloc Peugeot    + 1m40.8s

     5. Francois Delecour     Kronos Peugeot       + 3m25.0s

     6. Julien Maurin         Ford                 + 3m37.6s

     7. Andreas Aigner        Stohl Subaru         + 7m53.9s

     8. Jean-Mathieu Leandri  Sainteloc Peugeot    + 8m47.8s

     9. Germain Bonnefis      Renault              + 9m16.8s

    10. Jean Michel Raoux     Delta Peugeot        + 13m54.3s

    Photography: Rowan Horncastle

  9. If you’ve not guessed already, we’ve been at the Corsican round of the European Rally Championship this weekend, following the stellar field of LMP1 drivers, former F1 stars, and rallying heroes.

    And the perilous rally of 10,000 curves didn’t fail to deliver. Won by Bryan Bouffier driving his 2017 Super 2000 car, who shocked the rallying world with a surprise win at Monte Carlo in 2011, it was also Peugeot’s first international rally title since Thierry Neuville won in 2011 at Sanremo.

    It was a close fought battle between Bouffier and ERC leader, Jan Kopecky, who’s driving for Skoda. Just before midday service, the FabiaS2000 had established a healthy lead over Bouffier who’d been dominating the previous day. But Kopecky’s car suffered engine woes on the last stage, leaving no choice but to limp to the finish line – and second place - on three cylinders.

    Another hopeful for a Championship win was Craig Breen in his Sainteloc Peugeot, who’d set the pace early in the rally. But a puncture put paid to his efforts, and he was left to fight with Toyota Le Mans driver, Stephane Sarrazin, for third place.

    Sarrazin’s Mini had form at the rally – it was the very car that won in 2012, and the Frenchman was able to jostle Breen off the podium and take third.

    Ex-F1 star, Robert Kubica (read our exclusive chat with Top Gear Man of the Year 2012 here), was forced to retire after a fueling problem in his Citroen DS3.  

    Want more rallying action? Read our passenger ride with Kris Meeke here, and check out the corner that killed Group B rallying.

    Here are the final results:

    Pos  Driver               Team/Car             Time/Gap

     1. Bryan Bouffier        Delta Peugeot        2h41m58.2s

     2. Jan Kopecky           Skoda                + 39.8s

     3. Stephane Sarrazin     First Mini           + 1m37.6s

     4. Craig Breen           Sainteloc Peugeot    + 1m40.8s

     5. Francois Delecour     Kronos Peugeot       + 3m25.0s

     6. Julien Maurin         Ford                 + 3m37.6s

     7. Andreas Aigner        Stohl Subaru         + 7m53.9s

     8. Jean-Mathieu Leandri  Sainteloc Peugeot    + 8m47.8s

     9. Germain Bonnefis      Renault              + 9m16.8s

    10. Jean Michel Raoux     Delta Peugeot        + 13m54.3s

    Photography: Rowan Horncastle

  10. If you’ve not guessed already, we’ve been at the Corsican round of the European Rally Championship this weekend, following the stellar field of LMP1 drivers, former F1 stars, and rallying heroes.

    And the perilous rally of 10,000 curves didn’t fail to deliver. Won by Bryan Bouffier driving his 2017 Super 2000 car, who shocked the rallying world with a surprise win at Monte Carlo in 2011, it was also Peugeot’s first international rally title since Thierry Neuville won in 2011 at Sanremo.

    It was a close fought battle between Bouffier and ERC leader, Jan Kopecky, who’s driving for Skoda. Just before midday service, the FabiaS2000 had established a healthy lead over Bouffier who’d been dominating the previous day. But Kopecky’s car suffered engine woes on the last stage, leaving no choice but to limp to the finish line – and second place - on three cylinders.

    Another hopeful for a Championship win was Craig Breen in his Sainteloc Peugeot, who’d set the pace early in the rally. But a puncture put paid to his efforts, and he was left to fight with Toyota Le Mans driver, Stephane Sarrazin, for third place.

    Sarrazin’s Mini had form at the rally – it was the very car that won in 2012, and the Frenchman was able to jostle Breen off the podium and take third.

    Ex-F1 star, Robert Kubica (read our exclusive chat with Top Gear Man of the Year 2012 here), was forced to retire after a fueling problem in his Citroen DS3.  

    Want more rallying action? Read our passenger ride with Kris Meeke here, and check out the corner that killed Group B rallying.

    Here are the final results:

    Pos  Driver               Team/Car             Time/Gap

     1. Bryan Bouffier        Delta Peugeot        2h41m58.2s

     2. Jan Kopecky           Skoda                + 39.8s

     3. Stephane Sarrazin     First Mini           + 1m37.6s

     4. Craig Breen           Sainteloc Peugeot    + 1m40.8s

     5. Francois Delecour     Kronos Peugeot       + 3m25.0s

     6. Julien Maurin         Ford                 + 3m37.6s

     7. Andreas Aigner        Stohl Subaru         + 7m53.9s

     8. Jean-Mathieu Leandri  Sainteloc Peugeot    + 8m47.8s

     9. Germain Bonnefis      Renault              + 9m16.8s

    10. Jean Michel Raoux     Delta Peugeot        + 13m54.3s

    Photography: Rowan Horncastle

  11. If you’ve not guessed already, we’ve been at the Corsican round of the European Rally Championship this weekend, following the stellar field of LMP1 drivers, former F1 stars, and rallying heroes.

    And the perilous rally of 10,000 curves didn’t fail to deliver. Won by Bryan Bouffier driving his 2017 Super 2000 car, who shocked the rallying world with a surprise win at Monte Carlo in 2011, it was also Peugeot’s first international rally title since Thierry Neuville won in 2011 at Sanremo.

    It was a close fought battle between Bouffier and ERC leader, Jan Kopecky, who’s driving for Skoda. Just before midday service, the FabiaS2000 had established a healthy lead over Bouffier who’d been dominating the previous day. But Kopecky’s car suffered engine woes on the last stage, leaving no choice but to limp to the finish line – and second place - on three cylinders.

    Another hopeful for a Championship win was Craig Breen in his Sainteloc Peugeot, who’d set the pace early in the rally. But a puncture put paid to his efforts, and he was left to fight with Toyota Le Mans driver, Stephane Sarrazin, for third place.

    Sarrazin’s Mini had form at the rally – it was the very car that won in 2012, and the Frenchman was able to jostle Breen off the podium and take third.

    Ex-F1 star, Robert Kubica (read our exclusive chat with Top Gear Man of the Year 2012 here), was forced to retire after a fueling problem in his Citroen DS3.  

    Want more rallying action? Read our passenger ride with Kris Meeke here, and check out the corner that killed Group B rallying.

    Here are the final results:

    Pos  Driver               Team/Car             Time/Gap

     1. Bryan Bouffier        Delta Peugeot        2h41m58.2s

     2. Jan Kopecky           Skoda                + 39.8s

     3. Stephane Sarrazin     First Mini           + 1m37.6s

     4. Craig Breen           Sainteloc Peugeot    + 1m40.8s

     5. Francois Delecour     Kronos Peugeot       + 3m25.0s

     6. Julien Maurin         Ford                 + 3m37.6s

     7. Andreas Aigner        Stohl Subaru         + 7m53.9s

     8. Jean-Mathieu Leandri  Sainteloc Peugeot    + 8m47.8s

     9. Germain Bonnefis      Renault              + 9m16.8s

    10. Jean Michel Raoux     Delta Peugeot        + 13m54.3s

    Photography: Rowan Horncastle

  12. If you’ve not guessed already, we’ve been at the Corsican round of the European Rally Championship this weekend, following the stellar field of LMP1 drivers, former F1 stars, and rallying heroes.

    And the perilous rally of 10,000 curves didn’t fail to deliver. Won by Bryan Bouffier driving his 2017 Super 2000 car, who shocked the rallying world with a surprise win at Monte Carlo in 2011, it was also Peugeot’s first international rally title since Thierry Neuville won in 2011 at Sanremo.

    It was a close fought battle between Bouffier and ERC leader, Jan Kopecky, who’s driving for Skoda. Just before midday service, the FabiaS2000 had established a healthy lead over Bouffier who’d been dominating the previous day. But Kopecky’s car suffered engine woes on the last stage, leaving no choice but to limp to the finish line – and second place - on three cylinders.

    Another hopeful for a Championship win was Craig Breen in his Sainteloc Peugeot, who’d set the pace early in the rally. But a puncture put paid to his efforts, and he was left to fight with Toyota Le Mans driver, Stephane Sarrazin, for third place.

    Sarrazin’s Mini had form at the rally – it was the very car that won in 2012, and the Frenchman was able to jostle Breen off the podium and take third.

    Ex-F1 star, Robert Kubica (read our exclusive chat with Top Gear Man of the Year 2012 here), was forced to retire after a fueling problem in his Citroen DS3.  

    Want more rallying action? Read our passenger ride with Kris Meeke here, and check out the corner that killed Group B rallying.

    Here are the final results:

    Pos  Driver               Team/Car             Time/Gap

     1. Bryan Bouffier        Delta Peugeot        2h41m58.2s

     2. Jan Kopecky           Skoda                + 39.8s

     3. Stephane Sarrazin     First Mini           + 1m37.6s

     4. Craig Breen           Sainteloc Peugeot    + 1m40.8s

     5. Francois Delecour     Kronos Peugeot       + 3m25.0s

     6. Julien Maurin         Ford                 + 3m37.6s

     7. Andreas Aigner        Stohl Subaru         + 7m53.9s

     8. Jean-Mathieu Leandri  Sainteloc Peugeot    + 8m47.8s

     9. Germain Bonnefis      Renault              + 9m16.8s

    10. Jean Michel Raoux     Delta Peugeot        + 13m54.3s

    Photography: Rowan Horncastle

  13. If you’ve not guessed already, we’ve been at the Corsican round of the European Rally Championship this weekend, following the stellar field of LMP1 drivers, former F1 stars, and rallying heroes.

    And the perilous rally of 10,000 curves didn’t fail to deliver. Won by Bryan Bouffier driving his 2017 Super 2000 car, who shocked the rallying world with a surprise win at Monte Carlo in 2011, it was also Peugeot’s first international rally title since Thierry Neuville won in 2011 at Sanremo.

    It was a close fought battle between Bouffier and ERC leader, Jan Kopecky, who’s driving for Skoda. Just before midday service, the FabiaS2000 had established a healthy lead over Bouffier who’d been dominating the previous day. But Kopecky’s car suffered engine woes on the last stage, leaving no choice but to limp to the finish line – and second place - on three cylinders.

    Another hopeful for a Championship win was Craig Breen in his Sainteloc Peugeot, who’d set the pace early in the rally. But a puncture put paid to his efforts, and he was left to fight with Toyota Le Mans driver, Stephane Sarrazin, for third place.

    Sarrazin’s Mini had form at the rally – it was the very car that won in 2012, and the Frenchman was able to jostle Breen off the podium and take third.

    Ex-F1 star, Robert Kubica (read our exclusive chat with Top Gear Man of the Year 2012 here), was forced to retire after a fueling problem in his Citroen DS3.  

    Want more rallying action? Read our passenger ride with Kris Meeke here, and check out the corner that killed Group B rallying.

    Here are the final results:

    Pos  Driver               Team/Car             Time/Gap

     1. Bryan Bouffier        Delta Peugeot        2h41m58.2s

     2. Jan Kopecky           Skoda                + 39.8s

     3. Stephane Sarrazin     First Mini           + 1m37.6s

     4. Craig Breen           Sainteloc Peugeot    + 1m40.8s

     5. Francois Delecour     Kronos Peugeot       + 3m25.0s

     6. Julien Maurin         Ford                 + 3m37.6s

     7. Andreas Aigner        Stohl Subaru         + 7m53.9s

     8. Jean-Mathieu Leandri  Sainteloc Peugeot    + 8m47.8s

     9. Germain Bonnefis      Renault              + 9m16.8s

    10. Jean Michel Raoux     Delta Peugeot        + 13m54.3s

    Photography: Rowan Horncastle

  14. If you’ve not guessed already, we’ve been at the Corsican round of the European Rally Championship this weekend, following the stellar field of LMP1 drivers, former F1 stars, and rallying heroes.

    And the perilous rally of 10,000 curves didn’t fail to deliver. Won by Bryan Bouffier driving his 2017 Super 2000 car, who shocked the rallying world with a surprise win at Monte Carlo in 2011, it was also Peugeot’s first international rally title since Thierry Neuville won in 2011 at Sanremo.

    It was a close fought battle between Bouffier and ERC leader, Jan Kopecky, who’s driving for Skoda. Just before midday service, the FabiaS2000 had established a healthy lead over Bouffier who’d been dominating the previous day. But Kopecky’s car suffered engine woes on the last stage, leaving no choice but to limp to the finish line – and second place - on three cylinders.

    Another hopeful for a Championship win was Craig Breen in his Sainteloc Peugeot, who’d set the pace early in the rally. But a puncture put paid to his efforts, and he was left to fight with Toyota Le Mans driver, Stephane Sarrazin, for third place.

    Sarrazin’s Mini had form at the rally – it was the very car that won in 2012, and the Frenchman was able to jostle Breen off the podium and take third.

    Ex-F1 star, Robert Kubica (read our exclusive chat with Top Gear Man of the Year 2012 here), was forced to retire after a fueling problem in his Citroen DS3.  

    Want more rallying action? Read our passenger ride with Kris Meeke here, and check out the corner that killed Group B rallying.

    Here are the final results:

    Pos  Driver               Team/Car             Time/Gap

     1. Bryan Bouffier        Delta Peugeot        2h41m58.2s

     2. Jan Kopecky           Skoda                + 39.8s

     3. Stephane Sarrazin     First Mini           + 1m37.6s

     4. Craig Breen           Sainteloc Peugeot    + 1m40.8s

     5. Francois Delecour     Kronos Peugeot       + 3m25.0s

     6. Julien Maurin         Ford                 + 3m37.6s

     7. Andreas Aigner        Stohl Subaru         + 7m53.9s

     8. Jean-Mathieu Leandri  Sainteloc Peugeot    + 8m47.8s

     9. Germain Bonnefis      Renault              + 9m16.8s

    10. Jean Michel Raoux     Delta Peugeot        + 13m54.3s

    Photography: Rowan Horncastle

  15. If you’ve not guessed already, we’ve been at the Corsican round of the European Rally Championship this weekend, following the stellar field of LMP1 drivers, former F1 stars, and rallying heroes.

    And the perilous rally of 10,000 curves didn’t fail to deliver. Won by Bryan Bouffier driving his 2017 Super 2000 car, who shocked the rallying world with a surprise win at Monte Carlo in 2011, it was also Peugeot’s first international rally title since Thierry Neuville won in 2011 at Sanremo.

    It was a close fought battle between Bouffier and ERC leader, Jan Kopecky, who’s driving for Skoda. Just before midday service, the FabiaS2000 had established a healthy lead over Bouffier who’d been dominating the previous day. But Kopecky’s car suffered engine woes on the last stage, leaving no choice but to limp to the finish line – and second place - on three cylinders.

    Another hopeful for a Championship win was Craig Breen in his Sainteloc Peugeot, who’d set the pace early in the rally. But a puncture put paid to his efforts, and he was left to fight with Toyota Le Mans driver, Stephane Sarrazin, for third place.

    Sarrazin’s Mini had form at the rally – it was the very car that won in 2012, and the Frenchman was able to jostle Breen off the podium and take third.

    Ex-F1 star, Robert Kubica (read our exclusive chat with Top Gear Man of the Year 2012 here), was forced to retire after a fueling problem in his Citroen DS3.  

    Want more rallying action? Read our passenger ride with Kris Meeke here, and check out the corner that killed Group B rallying.

    Here are the final results:

    Pos  Driver               Team/Car             Time/Gap

     1. Bryan Bouffier        Delta Peugeot        2h41m58.2s

     2. Jan Kopecky           Skoda                + 39.8s

     3. Stephane Sarrazin     First Mini           + 1m37.6s

     4. Craig Breen           Sainteloc Peugeot    + 1m40.8s

     5. Francois Delecour     Kronos Peugeot       + 3m25.0s

     6. Julien Maurin         Ford                 + 3m37.6s

     7. Andreas Aigner        Stohl Subaru         + 7m53.9s

     8. Jean-Mathieu Leandri  Sainteloc Peugeot    + 8m47.8s

     9. Germain Bonnefis      Renault              + 9m16.8s

    10. Jean Michel Raoux     Delta Peugeot        + 13m54.3s

    Photography: Rowan Horncastle

  16. If you’ve not guessed already, we’ve been at the Corsican round of the European Rally Championship this weekend, following the stellar field of LMP1 drivers, former F1 stars, and rallying heroes.

    And the perilous rally of 10,000 curves didn’t fail to deliver. Won by Bryan Bouffier driving his 2017 Super 2000 car, who shocked the rallying world with a surprise win at Monte Carlo in 2011, it was also Peugeot’s first international rally title since Thierry Neuville won in 2011 at Sanremo.

    It was a close fought battle between Bouffier and ERC leader, Jan Kopecky, who’s driving for Skoda. Just before midday service, the FabiaS2000 had established a healthy lead over Bouffier who’d been dominating the previous day. But Kopecky’s car suffered engine woes on the last stage, leaving no choice but to limp to the finish line – and second place - on three cylinders.

    Another hopeful for a Championship win was Craig Breen in his Sainteloc Peugeot, who’d set the pace early in the rally. But a puncture put paid to his efforts, and he was left to fight with Toyota Le Mans driver, Stephane Sarrazin, for third place.

    Sarrazin’s Mini had form at the rally – it was the very car that won in 2012, and the Frenchman was able to jostle Breen off the podium and take third.

    Ex-F1 star, Robert Kubica (read our exclusive chat with Top Gear Man of the Year 2012 here), was forced to retire after a fueling problem in his Citroen DS3.  

    Want more rallying action? Read our passenger ride with Kris Meeke here, and check out the corner that killed Group B rallying.

    Here are the final results:

    Pos  Driver               Team/Car             Time/Gap

     1. Bryan Bouffier        Delta Peugeot        2h41m58.2s

     2. Jan Kopecky           Skoda                + 39.8s

     3. Stephane Sarrazin     First Mini           + 1m37.6s

     4. Craig Breen           Sainteloc Peugeot    + 1m40.8s

     5. Francois Delecour     Kronos Peugeot       + 3m25.0s

     6. Julien Maurin         Ford                 + 3m37.6s

     7. Andreas Aigner        Stohl Subaru         + 7m53.9s

     8. Jean-Mathieu Leandri  Sainteloc Peugeot    + 8m47.8s

     9. Germain Bonnefis      Renault              + 9m16.8s

    10. Jean Michel Raoux     Delta Peugeot        + 13m54.3s

    Photography: Rowan Horncastle

  17. If you’ve not guessed already, we’ve been at the Corsican round of the European Rally Championship this weekend, following the stellar field of LMP1 drivers, former F1 stars, and rallying heroes.

    And the perilous rally of 10,000 curves didn’t fail to deliver. Won by Bryan Bouffier driving his 2017 Super 2000 car, who shocked the rallying world with a surprise win at Monte Carlo in 2011, it was also Peugeot’s first international rally title since Thierry Neuville won in 2011 at Sanremo.

    It was a close fought battle between Bouffier and ERC leader, Jan Kopecky, who’s driving for Skoda. Just before midday service, the FabiaS2000 had established a healthy lead over Bouffier who’d been dominating the previous day. But Kopecky’s car suffered engine woes on the last stage, leaving no choice but to limp to the finish line – and second place - on three cylinders.

    Another hopeful for a Championship win was Craig Breen in his Sainteloc Peugeot, who’d set the pace early in the rally. But a puncture put paid to his efforts, and he was left to fight with Toyota Le Mans driver, Stephane Sarrazin, for third place.

    Sarrazin’s Mini had form at the rally – it was the very car that won in 2012, and the Frenchman was able to jostle Breen off the podium and take third.

    Ex-F1 star, Robert Kubica (read our exclusive chat with Top Gear Man of the Year 2012 here), was forced to retire after a fueling problem in his Citroen DS3.  

    Want more rallying action? Read our passenger ride with Kris Meeke here, and check out the corner that killed Group B rallying.

    Here are the final results:

    Pos  Driver               Team/Car             Time/Gap

     1. Bryan Bouffier        Delta Peugeot        2h41m58.2s

     2. Jan Kopecky           Skoda                + 39.8s

     3. Stephane Sarrazin     First Mini           + 1m37.6s

     4. Craig Breen           Sainteloc Peugeot    + 1m40.8s

     5. Francois Delecour     Kronos Peugeot       + 3m25.0s

     6. Julien Maurin         Ford                 + 3m37.6s

     7. Andreas Aigner        Stohl Subaru         + 7m53.9s

     8. Jean-Mathieu Leandri  Sainteloc Peugeot    + 8m47.8s

     9. Germain Bonnefis      Renault              + 9m16.8s

    10. Jean Michel Raoux     Delta Peugeot        + 13m54.3s

    Photography: Rowan Horncastle

  18. If you’ve not guessed already, we’ve been at the Corsican round of the European Rally Championship this weekend, following the stellar field of LMP1 drivers, former F1 stars, and rallying heroes.

    And the perilous rally of 10,000 curves didn’t fail to deliver. Won by Bryan Bouffier driving his 2017 Super 2000 car, who shocked the rallying world with a surprise win at Monte Carlo in 2011, it was also Peugeot’s first international rally title since Thierry Neuville won in 2011 at Sanremo.

    It was a close fought battle between Bouffier and ERC leader, Jan Kopecky, who’s driving for Skoda. Just before midday service, the FabiaS2000 had established a healthy lead over Bouffier who’d been dominating the previous day. But Kopecky’s car suffered engine woes on the last stage, leaving no choice but to limp to the finish line – and second place - on three cylinders.

    Another hopeful for a Championship win was Craig Breen in his Sainteloc Peugeot, who’d set the pace early in the rally. But a puncture put paid to his efforts, and he was left to fight with Toyota Le Mans driver, Stephane Sarrazin, for third place.

    Sarrazin’s Mini had form at the rally – it was the very car that won in 2012, and the Frenchman was able to jostle Breen off the podium and take third.

    Ex-F1 star, Robert Kubica (read our exclusive chat with Top Gear Man of the Year 2012 here), was forced to retire after a fueling problem in his Citroen DS3.  

    Want more rallying action? Read our passenger ride with Kris Meeke here, and check out the corner that killed Group B rallying.

    Here are the final results:

    Pos  Driver               Team/Car             Time/Gap

     1. Bryan Bouffier        Delta Peugeot        2h41m58.2s

     2. Jan Kopecky           Skoda                + 39.8s

     3. Stephane Sarrazin     First Mini           + 1m37.6s

     4. Craig Breen           Sainteloc Peugeot    + 1m40.8s

     5. Francois Delecour     Kronos Peugeot       + 3m25.0s

     6. Julien Maurin         Ford                 + 3m37.6s

     7. Andreas Aigner        Stohl Subaru         + 7m53.9s

     8. Jean-Mathieu Leandri  Sainteloc Peugeot    + 8m47.8s

     9. Germain Bonnefis      Renault              + 9m16.8s

    10. Jean Michel Raoux     Delta Peugeot        + 13m54.3s

    Photography: Rowan Horncastle

  19. If you’ve not guessed already, we’ve been at the Corsican round of the European Rally Championship this weekend, following the stellar field of LMP1 drivers, former F1 stars, and rallying heroes.

    And the perilous rally of 10,000 curves didn’t fail to deliver. Won by Bryan Bouffier driving his 2017 Super 2000 car, who shocked the rallying world with a surprise win at Monte Carlo in 2011, it was also Peugeot’s first international rally title since Thierry Neuville won in 2011 at Sanremo.

    It was a close fought battle between Bouffier and ERC leader, Jan Kopecky, who’s driving for Skoda. Just before midday service, the FabiaS2000 had established a healthy lead over Bouffier who’d been dominating the previous day. But Kopecky’s car suffered engine woes on the last stage, leaving no choice but to limp to the finish line – and second place - on three cylinders.

    Another hopeful for a Championship win was Craig Breen in his Sainteloc Peugeot, who’d set the pace early in the rally. But a puncture put paid to his efforts, and he was left to fight with Toyota Le Mans driver, Stephane Sarrazin, for third place.

    Sarrazin’s Mini had form at the rally – it was the very car that won in 2012, and the Frenchman was able to jostle Breen off the podium and take third.

    Ex-F1 star, Robert Kubica (read our exclusive chat with Top Gear Man of the Year 2012 here), was forced to retire after a fueling problem in his Citroen DS3.  

    Want more rallying action? Read our passenger ride with Kris Meeke here, and check out the corner that killed Group B rallying.

    Here are the final results:

    Pos  Driver               Team/Car             Time/Gap

     1. Bryan Bouffier        Delta Peugeot        2h41m58.2s

     2. Jan Kopecky           Skoda                + 39.8s

     3. Stephane Sarrazin     First Mini           + 1m37.6s

     4. Craig Breen           Sainteloc Peugeot    + 1m40.8s

     5. Francois Delecour     Kronos Peugeot       + 3m25.0s

     6. Julien Maurin         Ford                 + 3m37.6s

     7. Andreas Aigner        Stohl Subaru         + 7m53.9s

     8. Jean-Mathieu Leandri  Sainteloc Peugeot    + 8m47.8s

     9. Germain Bonnefis      Renault              + 9m16.8s

    10. Jean Michel Raoux     Delta Peugeot        + 13m54.3s

    Photography: Rowan Horncastle

  20. If you’ve not guessed already, we’ve been at the Corsican round of the European Rally Championship this weekend, following the stellar field of LMP1 drivers, former F1 stars, and rallying heroes.

    And the perilous rally of 10,000 curves didn’t fail to deliver. Won by Bryan Bouffier driving his 2017 Super 2000 car, who shocked the rallying world with a surprise win at Monte Carlo in 2011, it was also Peugeot’s first international rally title since Thierry Neuville won in 2011 at Sanremo.

    It was a close fought battle between Bouffier and ERC leader, Jan Kopecky, who’s driving for Skoda. Just before midday service, the FabiaS2000 had established a healthy lead over Bouffier who’d been dominating the previous day. But Kopecky’s car suffered engine woes on the last stage, leaving no choice but to limp to the finish line – and second place - on three cylinders.

    Another hopeful for a Championship win was Craig Breen in his Sainteloc Peugeot, who’d set the pace early in the rally. But a puncture put paid to his efforts, and he was left to fight with Toyota Le Mans driver, Stephane Sarrazin, for third place.

    Sarrazin’s Mini had form at the rally – it was the very car that won in 2012, and the Frenchman was able to jostle Breen off the podium and take third.

    Ex-F1 star, Robert Kubica (read our exclusive chat with Top Gear Man of the Year 2012 here), was forced to retire after a fueling problem in his Citroen DS3.  

    Want more rallying action? Read our passenger ride with Kris Meeke here, and check out the corner that killed Group B rallying.

    Here are the final results:

    Pos  Driver               Team/Car             Time/Gap

     1. Bryan Bouffier        Delta Peugeot        2h41m58.2s

     2. Jan Kopecky           Skoda                + 39.8s

     3. Stephane Sarrazin     First Mini           + 1m37.6s

     4. Craig Breen           Sainteloc Peugeot    + 1m40.8s

     5. Francois Delecour     Kronos Peugeot       + 3m25.0s

     6. Julien Maurin         Ford                 + 3m37.6s

     7. Andreas Aigner        Stohl Subaru         + 7m53.9s

     8. Jean-Mathieu Leandri  Sainteloc Peugeot    + 8m47.8s

     9. Germain Bonnefis      Renault              + 9m16.8s

    10. Jean Michel Raoux     Delta Peugeot        + 13m54.3s

    Photography: Rowan Horncastle

  21. If you’ve not guessed already, we’ve been at the Corsican round of the European Rally Championship this weekend, following the stellar field of LMP1 drivers, former F1 stars, and rallying heroes.

    And the perilous rally of 10,000 curves didn’t fail to deliver. Won by Bryan Bouffier driving his 2017 Super 2000 car, who shocked the rallying world with a surprise win at Monte Carlo in 2011, it was also Peugeot’s first international rally title since Thierry Neuville won in 2011 at Sanremo.

    It was a close fought battle between Bouffier and ERC leader, Jan Kopecky, who’s driving for Skoda. Just before midday service, the FabiaS2000 had established a healthy lead over Bouffier who’d been dominating the previous day. But Kopecky’s car suffered engine woes on the last stage, leaving no choice but to limp to the finish line – and second place - on three cylinders.

    Another hopeful for a Championship win was Craig Breen in his Sainteloc Peugeot, who’d set the pace early in the rally. But a puncture put paid to his efforts, and he was left to fight with Toyota Le Mans driver, Stephane Sarrazin, for third place.

    Sarrazin’s Mini had form at the rally – it was the very car that won in 2012, and the Frenchman was able to jostle Breen off the podium and take third.

    Ex-F1 star, Robert Kubica (read our exclusive chat with Top Gear Man of the Year 2012 here), was forced to retire after a fueling problem in his Citroen DS3.  

    Want more rallying action? Read our passenger ride with Kris Meeke here, and check out the corner that killed Group B rallying.

    Here are the final results:

    Pos  Driver               Team/Car             Time/Gap

     1. Bryan Bouffier        Delta Peugeot        2h41m58.2s

     2. Jan Kopecky           Skoda                + 39.8s

     3. Stephane Sarrazin     First Mini           + 1m37.6s

     4. Craig Breen           Sainteloc Peugeot    + 1m40.8s

     5. Francois Delecour     Kronos Peugeot       + 3m25.0s

     6. Julien Maurin         Ford                 + 3m37.6s

     7. Andreas Aigner        Stohl Subaru         + 7m53.9s

     8. Jean-Mathieu Leandri  Sainteloc Peugeot    + 8m47.8s

     9. Germain Bonnefis      Renault              + 9m16.8s

    10. Jean Michel Raoux     Delta Peugeot        + 13m54.3s

    Photography: Rowan Horncastle

  22. If you’ve not guessed already, we’ve been at the Corsican round of the European Rally Championship this weekend, following the stellar field of LMP1 drivers, former F1 stars, and rallying heroes.

    And the perilous rally of 10,000 curves didn’t fail to deliver. Won by Bryan Bouffier driving his 2017 Super 2000 car, who shocked the rallying world with a surprise win at Monte Carlo in 2011, it was also Peugeot’s first international rally title since Thierry Neuville won in 2011 at Sanremo.

    It was a close fought battle between Bouffier and ERC leader, Jan Kopecky, who’s driving for Skoda. Just before midday service, the FabiaS2000 had established a healthy lead over Bouffier who’d been dominating the previous day. But Kopecky’s car suffered engine woes on the last stage, leaving no choice but to limp to the finish line – and second place - on three cylinders.

    Another hopeful for a Championship win was Craig Breen in his Sainteloc Peugeot, who’d set the pace early in the rally. But a puncture put paid to his efforts, and he was left to fight with Toyota Le Mans driver, Stephane Sarrazin, for third place.

    Sarrazin’s Mini had form at the rally – it was the very car that won in 2012, and the Frenchman was able to jostle Breen off the podium and take third.

    Ex-F1 star, Robert Kubica (read our exclusive chat with Top Gear Man of the Year 2012 here), was forced to retire after a fueling problem in his Citroen DS3.  

    Want more rallying action? Read our passenger ride with Kris Meeke here, and check out the corner that killed Group B rallying.

    Here are the final results:

    Pos  Driver               Team/Car             Time/Gap

     1. Bryan Bouffier        Delta Peugeot        2h41m58.2s

     2. Jan Kopecky           Skoda                + 39.8s

     3. Stephane Sarrazin     First Mini           + 1m37.6s

     4. Craig Breen           Sainteloc Peugeot    + 1m40.8s

     5. Francois Delecour     Kronos Peugeot       + 3m25.0s

     6. Julien Maurin         Ford                 + 3m37.6s

     7. Andreas Aigner        Stohl Subaru         + 7m53.9s

     8. Jean-Mathieu Leandri  Sainteloc Peugeot    + 8m47.8s

     9. Germain Bonnefis      Renault              + 9m16.8s

    10. Jean Michel Raoux     Delta Peugeot        + 13m54.3s

    Photography: Rowan Horncastle

  23. If you’ve not guessed already, we’ve been at the Corsican round of the European Rally Championship this weekend, following the stellar field of LMP1 drivers, former F1 stars, and rallying heroes.

    And the perilous rally of 10,000 curves didn’t fail to deliver. Won by Bryan Bouffier driving his 2017 Super 2000 car, who shocked the rallying world with a surprise win at Monte Carlo in 2011, it was also Peugeot’s first international rally title since Thierry Neuville won in 2011 at Sanremo.

    It was a close fought battle between Bouffier and ERC leader, Jan Kopecky, who’s driving for Skoda. Just before midday service, the FabiaS2000 had established a healthy lead over Bouffier who’d been dominating the previous day. But Kopecky’s car suffered engine woes on the last stage, leaving no choice but to limp to the finish line – and second place - on three cylinders.

    Another hopeful for a Championship win was Craig Breen in his Sainteloc Peugeot, who’d set the pace early in the rally. But a puncture put paid to his efforts, and he was left to fight with Toyota Le Mans driver, Stephane Sarrazin, for third place.

    Sarrazin’s Mini had form at the rally – it was the very car that won in 2012, and the Frenchman was able to jostle Breen off the podium and take third.

    Ex-F1 star, Robert Kubica (read our exclusive chat with Top Gear Man of the Year 2012 here), was forced to retire after a fueling problem in his Citroen DS3.  

    Want more rallying action? Read our passenger ride with Kris Meeke here, and check out the corner that killed Group B rallying.

    Here are the final results:

    Pos  Driver               Team/Car             Time/Gap

     1. Bryan Bouffier        Delta Peugeot        2h41m58.2s

     2. Jan Kopecky           Skoda                + 39.8s

     3. Stephane Sarrazin     First Mini           + 1m37.6s

     4. Craig Breen           Sainteloc Peugeot    + 1m40.8s

     5. Francois Delecour     Kronos Peugeot       + 3m25.0s

     6. Julien Maurin         Ford                 + 3m37.6s

     7. Andreas Aigner        Stohl Subaru         + 7m53.9s

     8. Jean-Mathieu Leandri  Sainteloc Peugeot    + 8m47.8s

     9. Germain Bonnefis      Renault              + 9m16.8s

    10. Jean Michel Raoux     Delta Peugeot        + 13m54.3s

    Photography: Rowan Horncastle

  24. If you’ve not guessed already, we’ve been at the Corsican round of the European Rally Championship this weekend, following the stellar field of LMP1 drivers, former F1 stars, and rallying heroes.

    And the perilous rally of 10,000 curves didn’t fail to deliver. Won by Bryan Bouffier driving his 2017 Super 2000 car, who shocked the rallying world with a surprise win at Monte Carlo in 2011, it was also Peugeot’s first international rally title since Thierry Neuville won in 2011 at Sanremo.

    It was a close fought battle between Bouffier and ERC leader, Jan Kopecky, who’s driving for Skoda. Just before midday service, the FabiaS2000 had established a healthy lead over Bouffier who’d been dominating the previous day. But Kopecky’s car suffered engine woes on the last stage, leaving no choice but to limp to the finish line – and second place - on three cylinders.

    Another hopeful for a Championship win was Craig Breen in his Sainteloc Peugeot, who’d set the pace early in the rally. But a puncture put paid to his efforts, and he was left to fight with Toyota Le Mans driver, Stephane Sarrazin, for third place.

    Sarrazin’s Mini had form at the rally – it was the very car that won in 2012, and the Frenchman was able to jostle Breen off the podium and take third.

    Ex-F1 star, Robert Kubica (read our exclusive chat with Top Gear Man of the Year 2012 here), was forced to retire after a fueling problem in his Citroen DS3.  

    Want more rallying action? Read our passenger ride with Kris Meeke here, and check out the corner that killed Group B rallying.

    Here are the final results:

    Pos  Driver               Team/Car             Time/Gap

     1. Bryan Bouffier        Delta Peugeot        2h41m58.2s

     2. Jan Kopecky           Skoda                + 39.8s

     3. Stephane Sarrazin     First Mini           + 1m37.6s

     4. Craig Breen           Sainteloc Peugeot    + 1m40.8s

     5. Francois Delecour     Kronos Peugeot       + 3m25.0s

     6. Julien Maurin         Ford                 + 3m37.6s

     7. Andreas Aigner        Stohl Subaru         + 7m53.9s

     8. Jean-Mathieu Leandri  Sainteloc Peugeot    + 8m47.8s

     9. Germain Bonnefis      Renault              + 9m16.8s

    10. Jean Michel Raoux     Delta Peugeot        + 13m54.3s

    Photography: Rowan Horncastle

  25. If you’ve not guessed already, we’ve been at the Corsican round of the European Rally Championship this weekend, following the stellar field of LMP1 drivers, former F1 stars, and rallying heroes.

    And the perilous rally of 10,000 curves didn’t fail to deliver. Won by Bryan Bouffier driving his 2017 Super 2000 car, who shocked the rallying world with a surprise win at Monte Carlo in 2011, it was also Peugeot’s first international rally title since Thierry Neuville won in 2011 at Sanremo.

    It was a close fought battle between Bouffier and ERC leader, Jan Kopecky, who’s driving for Skoda. Just before midday service, the FabiaS2000 had established a healthy lead over Bouffier who’d been dominating the previous day. But Kopecky’s car suffered engine woes on the last stage, leaving no choice but to limp to the finish line – and second place - on three cylinders.

    Another hopeful for a Championship win was Craig Breen in his Sainteloc Peugeot, who’d set the pace early in the rally. But a puncture put paid to his efforts, and he was left to fight with Toyota Le Mans driver, Stephane Sarrazin, for third place.

    Sarrazin’s Mini had form at the rally – it was the very car that won in 2012, and the Frenchman was able to jostle Breen off the podium and take third.

    Ex-F1 star, Robert Kubica (read our exclusive chat with Top Gear Man of the Year 2012 here), was forced to retire after a fueling problem in his Citroen DS3.  

    Want more rallying action? Read our passenger ride with Kris Meeke here, and check out the corner that killed Group B rallying.

    Here are the final results:

    Pos  Driver               Team/Car             Time/Gap

     1. Bryan Bouffier        Delta Peugeot        2h41m58.2s

     2. Jan Kopecky           Skoda                + 39.8s

     3. Stephane Sarrazin     First Mini           + 1m37.6s

     4. Craig Breen           Sainteloc Peugeot    + 1m40.8s

     5. Francois Delecour     Kronos Peugeot       + 3m25.0s

     6. Julien Maurin         Ford                 + 3m37.6s

     7. Andreas Aigner        Stohl Subaru         + 7m53.9s

     8. Jean-Mathieu Leandri  Sainteloc Peugeot    + 8m47.8s

     9. Germain Bonnefis      Renault              + 9m16.8s

    10. Jean Michel Raoux     Delta Peugeot        + 13m54.3s

    Photography: Rowan Horncastle

  26. If you’ve not guessed already, we’ve been at the Corsican round of the European Rally Championship this weekend, following the stellar field of LMP1 drivers, former F1 stars, and rallying heroes.

    And the perilous rally of 10,000 curves didn’t fail to deliver. Won by Bryan Bouffier driving his 2017 Super 2000 car, who shocked the rallying world with a surprise win at Monte Carlo in 2011, it was also Peugeot’s first international rally title since Thierry Neuville won in 2011 at Sanremo.

    It was a close fought battle between Bouffier and ERC leader, Jan Kopecky, who’s driving for Skoda. Just before midday service, the FabiaS2000 had established a healthy lead over Bouffier who’d been dominating the previous day. But Kopecky’s car suffered engine woes on the last stage, leaving no choice but to limp to the finish line – and second place - on three cylinders.

    Another hopeful for a Championship win was Craig Breen in his Sainteloc Peugeot, who’d set the pace early in the rally. But a puncture put paid to his efforts, and he was left to fight with Toyota Le Mans driver, Stephane Sarrazin, for third place.

    Sarrazin’s Mini had form at the rally – it was the very car that won in 2012, and the Frenchman was able to jostle Breen off the podium and take third.

    Ex-F1 star, Robert Kubica (read our exclusive chat with Top Gear Man of the Year 2012 here), was forced to retire after a fueling problem in his Citroen DS3.  

    Want more rallying action? Read our passenger ride with Kris Meeke here, and check out the corner that killed Group B rallying.

    Here are the final results:

    Pos  Driver               Team/Car             Time/Gap

     1. Bryan Bouffier        Delta Peugeot        2h41m58.2s

     2. Jan Kopecky           Skoda                + 39.8s

     3. Stephane Sarrazin     First Mini           + 1m37.6s

     4. Craig Breen           Sainteloc Peugeot    + 1m40.8s

     5. Francois Delecour     Kronos Peugeot       + 3m25.0s

     6. Julien Maurin         Ford                 + 3m37.6s

     7. Andreas Aigner        Stohl Subaru         + 7m53.9s

     8. Jean-Mathieu Leandri  Sainteloc Peugeot    + 8m47.8s

     9. Germain Bonnefis      Renault              + 9m16.8s

    10. Jean Michel Raoux     Delta Peugeot        + 13m54.3s

    Photography: Rowan Horncastle

  27. If you’ve not guessed already, we’ve been at the Corsican round of the European Rally Championship this weekend, following the stellar field of LMP1 drivers, former F1 stars, and rallying heroes.

    And the perilous rally of 10,000 curves didn’t fail to deliver. Won by Bryan Bouffier driving his 2017 Super 2000 car, who shocked the rallying world with a surprise win at Monte Carlo in 2011, it was also Peugeot’s first international rally title since Thierry Neuville won in 2011 at Sanremo.

    It was a close fought battle between Bouffier and ERC leader, Jan Kopecky, who’s driving for Skoda. Just before midday service, the FabiaS2000 had established a healthy lead over Bouffier who’d been dominating the previous day. But Kopecky’s car suffered engine woes on the last stage, leaving no choice but to limp to the finish line – and second place - on three cylinders.

    Another hopeful for a Championship win was Craig Breen in his Sainteloc Peugeot, who’d set the pace early in the rally. But a puncture put paid to his efforts, and he was left to fight with Toyota Le Mans driver, Stephane Sarrazin, for third place.

    Sarrazin’s Mini had form at the rally – it was the very car that won in 2012, and the Frenchman was able to jostle Breen off the podium and take third.

    Ex-F1 star, Robert Kubica (read our exclusive chat with Top Gear Man of the Year 2012 here), was forced to retire after a fueling problem in his Citroen DS3.  

    Want more rallying action? Read our passenger ride with Kris Meeke here, and check out the corner that killed Group B rallying.

    Here are the final results:

    Pos  Driver               Team/Car             Time/Gap

     1. Bryan Bouffier        Delta Peugeot        2h41m58.2s

     2. Jan Kopecky           Skoda                + 39.8s

     3. Stephane Sarrazin     First Mini           + 1m37.6s

     4. Craig Breen           Sainteloc Peugeot    + 1m40.8s

     5. Francois Delecour     Kronos Peugeot       + 3m25.0s

     6. Julien Maurin         Ford                 + 3m37.6s

     7. Andreas Aigner        Stohl Subaru         + 7m53.9s

     8. Jean-Mathieu Leandri  Sainteloc Peugeot    + 8m47.8s

     9. Germain Bonnefis      Renault              + 9m16.8s

    10. Jean Michel Raoux     Delta Peugeot        + 13m54.3s

    Photography: Rowan Horncastle

  28. If you’ve not guessed already, we’ve been at the Corsican round of the European Rally Championship this weekend, following the stellar field of LMP1 drivers, former F1 stars, and rallying heroes.

    And the perilous rally of 10,000 curves didn’t fail to deliver. Won by Bryan Bouffier driving his 2017 Super 2000 car, who shocked the rallying world with a surprise win at Monte Carlo in 2011, it was also Peugeot’s first international rally title since Thierry Neuville won in 2011 at Sanremo.

    It was a close fought battle between Bouffier and ERC leader, Jan Kopecky, who’s driving for Skoda. Just before midday service, the FabiaS2000 had established a healthy lead over Bouffier who’d been dominating the previous day. But Kopecky’s car suffered engine woes on the last stage, leaving no choice but to limp to the finish line – and second place - on three cylinders.

    Another hopeful for a Championship win was Craig Breen in his Sainteloc Peugeot, who’d set the pace early in the rally. But a puncture put paid to his efforts, and he was left to fight with Toyota Le Mans driver, Stephane Sarrazin, for third place.

    Sarrazin’s Mini had form at the rally – it was the very car that won in 2012, and the Frenchman was able to jostle Breen off the podium and take third.

    Ex-F1 star, Robert Kubica (read our exclusive chat with Top Gear Man of the Year 2012 here), was forced to retire after a fueling problem in his Citroen DS3.  

    Want more rallying action? Read our passenger ride with Kris Meeke here, and check out the corner that killed Group B rallying.

    Here are the final results:

    Pos  Driver               Team/Car             Time/Gap

     1. Bryan Bouffier        Delta Peugeot        2h41m58.2s

     2. Jan Kopecky           Skoda                + 39.8s

     3. Stephane Sarrazin     First Mini           + 1m37.6s

     4. Craig Breen           Sainteloc Peugeot    + 1m40.8s

     5. Francois Delecour     Kronos Peugeot       + 3m25.0s

     6. Julien Maurin         Ford                 + 3m37.6s

     7. Andreas Aigner        Stohl Subaru         + 7m53.9s

     8. Jean-Mathieu Leandri  Sainteloc Peugeot    + 8m47.8s

     9. Germain Bonnefis      Renault              + 9m16.8s

    10. Jean Michel Raoux     Delta Peugeot        + 13m54.3s

    Photography: Rowan Horncastle

  29. If you’ve not guessed already, we’ve been at the Corsican round of the European Rally Championship this weekend, following the stellar field of LMP1 drivers, former F1 stars, and rallying heroes.

    And the perilous rally of 10,000 curves didn’t fail to deliver. Won by Bryan Bouffier driving his 2017 Super 2000 car, who shocked the rallying world with a surprise win at Monte Carlo in 2011, it was also Peugeot’s first international rally title since Thierry Neuville won in 2011 at Sanremo.

    It was a close fought battle between Bouffier and ERC leader, Jan Kopecky, who’s driving for Skoda. Just before midday service, the FabiaS2000 had established a healthy lead over Bouffier who’d been dominating the previous day. But Kopecky’s car suffered engine woes on the last stage, leaving no choice but to limp to the finish line – and second place - on three cylinders.

    Another hopeful for a Championship win was Craig Breen in his Sainteloc Peugeot, who’d set the pace early in the rally. But a puncture put paid to his efforts, and he was left to fight with Toyota Le Mans driver, Stephane Sarrazin, for third place.

    Sarrazin’s Mini had form at the rally – it was the very car that won in 2012, and the Frenchman was able to jostle Breen off the podium and take third.

    Ex-F1 star, Robert Kubica (read our exclusive chat with Top Gear Man of the Year 2012 here), was forced to retire after a fueling problem in his Citroen DS3.  

    Want more rallying action? Read our passenger ride with Kris Meeke here, and check out the corner that killed Group B rallying.

    Here are the final results:

    Pos  Driver               Team/Car             Time/Gap

     1. Bryan Bouffier        Delta Peugeot        2h41m58.2s

     2. Jan Kopecky           Skoda                + 39.8s

     3. Stephane Sarrazin     First Mini           + 1m37.6s

     4. Craig Breen           Sainteloc Peugeot    + 1m40.8s

     5. Francois Delecour     Kronos Peugeot       + 3m25.0s

     6. Julien Maurin         Ford                 + 3m37.6s

     7. Andreas Aigner        Stohl Subaru         + 7m53.9s

     8. Jean-Mathieu Leandri  Sainteloc Peugeot    + 8m47.8s

     9. Germain Bonnefis      Renault              + 9m16.8s

    10. Jean Michel Raoux     Delta Peugeot        + 13m54.3s

    Photography: Rowan Horncastle

  30. If you’ve not guessed already, we’ve been at the Corsican round of the European Rally Championship this weekend, following the stellar field of LMP1 drivers, former F1 stars, and rallying heroes.

    And the perilous rally of 10,000 curves didn’t fail to deliver. Won by Bryan Bouffier driving his 2017 Super 2000 car, who shocked the rallying world with a surprise win at Monte Carlo in 2011, it was also Peugeot’s first international rally title since Thierry Neuville won in 2011 at Sanremo.

    It was a close fought battle between Bouffier and ERC leader, Jan Kopecky, who’s driving for Skoda. Just before midday service, the FabiaS2000 had established a healthy lead over Bouffier who’d been dominating the previous day. But Kopecky’s car suffered engine woes on the last stage, leaving no choice but to limp to the finish line – and second place - on three cylinders.

    Another hopeful for a Championship win was Craig Breen in his Sainteloc Peugeot, who’d set the pace early in the rally. But a puncture put paid to his efforts, and he was left to fight with Toyota Le Mans driver, Stephane Sarrazin, for third place.

    Sarrazin’s Mini had form at the rally – it was the very car that won in 2012, and the Frenchman was able to jostle Breen off the podium and take third.

    Ex-F1 star, Robert Kubica (read our exclusive chat with Top Gear Man of the Year 2012 here), was forced to retire after a fueling problem in his Citroen DS3.  

    Want more rallying action? Read our passenger ride with Kris Meeke here, and check out the corner that killed Group B rallying.

    Here are the final results:

    Pos  Driver               Team/Car             Time/Gap

     1. Bryan Bouffier        Delta Peugeot        2h41m58.2s

     2. Jan Kopecky           Skoda                + 39.8s

     3. Stephane Sarrazin     First Mini           + 1m37.6s

     4. Craig Breen           Sainteloc Peugeot    + 1m40.8s

     5. Francois Delecour     Kronos Peugeot       + 3m25.0s

     6. Julien Maurin         Ford                 + 3m37.6s

     7. Andreas Aigner        Stohl Subaru         + 7m53.9s

     8. Jean-Mathieu Leandri  Sainteloc Peugeot    + 8m47.8s

     9. Germain Bonnefis      Renault              + 9m16.8s

    10. Jean Michel Raoux     Delta Peugeot        + 13m54.3s

    Photography: Rowan Horncastle

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