Skip to main content

You are here

Meet Hyundai’s i20 WRC

  1. Normal.dotm
    0
    0
    1
    248
    1419
    Worldwide
    11
    2
    1742
     12.0

    0
     false

    18 pt
    18 pt
    0
     0

    false
    false
     false

    /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:”Table Normal”; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:”“; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:”Times New Roman”; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi; mso-ansi-language:EN-US;}

    The World Rally Championship
    always needs more entrants. So be glad here’s another: Hyundai. They’ll be
    entering this supernaturally hormonal i20.

    Sure, right now
    Hyundai might not be the nameplate you most naturally associate with popping
    hissing turbos, or getting big air, or cornering via the driftoteque. But then,
    you wouldn’t have expected how soon and how thoroughly they challenged Europe’s
    best hatches with the new i30.

    You wouldn’t have expected the
    Veloster before it happened. This is a name on the move.

    When exactly it
    starts competing isn’t sure. The FIA has to give it an entry, and while that
    might be some of the later 2013 rallies, it might be 2014. Whatever, Hyundai
    will be diligently testing ‘til they’re allowed out in anger. The car will have
    Hyundai’s own 1.6 turbo engine and a proprietary rally gearbox and 4WD.

    The team will be
    based in Germany, but the rally car’s basic design and engineering is already
    being designed in Korea. There are no drivers recruited yet, but we were told:
    “We know a good driver makes all the difference, and we’re in this to
     win.”

    And even if you
    don’t follow rallying (why not?) this is good news. Already a team of engineers
    has been recruited whose specific job is to feed back from the rally car into
    road cars. Allan Rushforth, chief of Hyundai Europe, tells us they want to have
    more hot cars. To make them better, they listen to what we say and now they’re listening to what rally drivers say.

    Some of
    history’s great road cars have come out of rallying - the Escort Cosworth,
    Lancia Integrale, the Audi Quattro, the Impreza Turbo, the Mitsubishi Evo. A
    bunch of engineers trying to make another sounds OK to us.

    Paul Horrell

  2. The World Rally Championship always needs more entrants. So be glad here’s another: Hyundai. They’ll be entering this supernaturally hormonal i20.

    Sure, right now Hyundai might not be the nameplate you most naturally associate with popping hissing turbos, or getting big air, or cornering via the driftoteque. But then, you wouldn’t have expected how soon and how thoroughly they challenged Europe’s best hatches with the new i30.

    You wouldn’t have expected the Veloster before it happened. This is a name on the move.

    When exactly it starts competing isn’t sure. The FIA has to give it an entry, and while that might be some of the later 2013 rallies, it might be 2014. Whatever, Hyundai will be diligently testing ‘til they’re allowed out in anger. The car will have Hyundai’s own 1.6 turbo engine and a proprietary rally gearbox and 4WD.

    The team will be based in Germany, but the rally car’s basic design and engineering is already being designed in Korea. There are no drivers recruited yet, but we were told: “We know a good driver makes all the difference, and we’re in this to win.”

    And even if you don’t follow rallying (why not?) this is good news. Already a team of engineers has been recruited whose specific job is to feed back from the rally car into road cars. Allan Rushforth, chief of Hyundai Europe, tells us they want to have more hot cars. To make them better, they listen to what we say and now they’re listening to what rally drivers say.

    Some of history’s great road cars have come out of rallying - the Escort Cosworth, Lancia Integrale, the Audi Quattro, the Impreza Turbo, the Mitsubishi Evo. A bunch of engineers trying to make another sounds OK to us.

    Paul Horrell

  3. The World Rally Championship always needs more entrants. So be glad here’s another: Hyundai. They’ll be entering this supernaturally hormonal i20.

    Sure, right now Hyundai might not be the nameplate you most naturally associate with popping hissing turbos, or getting big air, or cornering via the driftoteque. But then, you wouldn’t have expected how soon and how thoroughly they challenged Europe’s best hatches with the new i30.

    You wouldn’t have expected the Veloster before it happened. This is a name on the move.

    When exactly it starts competing isn’t sure. The FIA has to give it an entry, and while that might be some of the later 2013 rallies, it might be 2014. Whatever, Hyundai will be diligently testing ‘til they’re allowed out in anger. The car will have Hyundai’s own 1.6 turbo engine and a proprietary rally gearbox and 4WD.

    The team will be based in Germany, but the rally car’s basic design and engineering is already being designed in Korea. There are no drivers recruited yet, but we were told: “We know a good driver makes all the difference, and we’re in this to win.”

    And even if you don’t follow rallying (why not?) this is good news. Already a team of engineers has been recruited whose specific job is to feed back from the rally car into road cars. Allan Rushforth, chief of Hyundai Europe, tells us they want to have more hot cars. To make them better, they listen to what we say and now they’re listening to what rally drivers say.

    Some of history’s great road cars have come out of rallying - the Escort Cosworth, Lancia Integrale, the Audi Quattro, the Impreza Turbo, the Mitsubishi Evo. A bunch of engineers trying to make another sounds OK to us.

    Paul Horrell

  4. The World Rally Championship always needs more entrants. So be glad here’s another: Hyundai. They’ll be entering this supernaturally hormonal i20.

    Sure, right now Hyundai might not be the nameplate you most naturally associate with popping hissing turbos, or getting big air, or cornering via the driftoteque. But then, you wouldn’t have expected how soon and how thoroughly they challenged Europe’s best hatches with the new i30.

    You wouldn’t have expected the Veloster before it happened. This is a name on the move.

    When exactly it starts competing isn’t sure. The FIA has to give it an entry, and while that might be some of the later 2013 rallies, it might be 2014. Whatever, Hyundai will be diligently testing ‘til they’re allowed out in anger. The car will have Hyundai’s own 1.6 turbo engine and a proprietary rally gearbox and 4WD.

    The team will be based in Germany, but the rally car’s basic design and engineering is already being designed in Korea. There are no drivers recruited yet, but we were told: “We know a good driver makes all the difference, and we’re in this to win.”

    And even if you don’t follow rallying (why not?) this is good news. Already a team of engineers has been recruited whose specific job is to feed back from the rally car into road cars. Allan Rushforth, chief of Hyundai Europe, tells us they want to have more hot cars. To make them better, they listen to what we say and now they’re listening to what rally drivers say.

    Some of history’s great road cars have come out of rallying - the Escort Cosworth, Lancia Integrale, the Audi Quattro, the Impreza Turbo, the Mitsubishi Evo. A bunch of engineers trying to make another sounds OK to us.

    Paul Horrell

  5. The World Rally Championship always needs more entrants. So be glad here’s another: Hyundai. They’ll be entering this supernaturally hormonal i20.

    Sure, right now Hyundai might not be the nameplate you most naturally associate with popping hissing turbos, or getting big air, or cornering via the driftoteque. But then, you wouldn’t have expected how soon and how thoroughly they challenged Europe’s best hatches with the new i30.

    You wouldn’t have expected the Veloster before it happened. This is a name on the move.

    When exactly it starts competing isn’t sure. The FIA has to give it an entry, and while that might be some of the later 2013 rallies, it might be 2014. Whatever, Hyundai will be diligently testing ‘til they’re allowed out in anger. The car will have Hyundai’s own 1.6 turbo engine and a proprietary rally gearbox and 4WD.

    The team will be based in Germany, but the rally car’s basic design and engineering is already being designed in Korea. There are no drivers recruited yet, but we were told: “We know a good driver makes all the difference, and we’re in this to win.”

    And even if you don’t follow rallying (why not?) this is good news. Already a team of engineers has been recruited whose specific job is to feed back from the rally car into road cars. Allan Rushforth, chief of Hyundai Europe, tells us they want to have more hot cars. To make them better, they listen to what we say and now they’re listening to what rally drivers say.

    Some of history’s great road cars have come out of rallying - the Escort Cosworth, Lancia Integrale, the Audi Quattro, the Impreza Turbo, the Mitsubishi Evo. A bunch of engineers trying to make another sounds OK to us.

    Paul Horrell

  6. The World Rally Championship always needs more entrants. So be glad here’s another: Hyundai. They’ll be entering this supernaturally hormonal i20.

    Sure, right now Hyundai might not be the nameplate you most naturally associate with popping hissing turbos, or getting big air, or cornering via the driftoteque. But then, you wouldn’t have expected how soon and how thoroughly they challenged Europe’s best hatches with the new i30.

    You wouldn’t have expected the Veloster before it happened. This is a name on the move.

    When exactly it starts competing isn’t sure. The FIA has to give it an entry, and while that might be some of the later 2013 rallies, it might be 2014. Whatever, Hyundai will be diligently testing ‘til they’re allowed out in anger. The car will have Hyundai’s own 1.6 turbo engine and a proprietary rally gearbox and 4WD.

    The team will be based in Germany, but the rally car’s basic design and engineering is already being designed in Korea. There are no drivers recruited yet, but we were told: “We know a good driver makes all the difference, and we’re in this to win.”

    And even if you don’t follow rallying (why not?) this is good news. Already a team of engineers has been recruited whose specific job is to feed back from the rally car into road cars. Allan Rushforth, chief of Hyundai Europe, tells us they want to have more hot cars. To make them better, they listen to what we say and now they’re listening to what rally drivers say.

    Some of history’s great road cars have come out of rallying - the Escort Cosworth, Lancia Integrale, the Audi Quattro, the Impreza Turbo, the Mitsubishi Evo. A bunch of engineers trying to make another sounds OK to us.

    Paul Horrell

  7. The World Rally Championship always needs more entrants. So be glad here’s another: Hyundai. They’ll be entering this supernaturally hormonal i20.

    Sure, right now Hyundai might not be the nameplate you most naturally associate with popping hissing turbos, or getting big air, or cornering via the driftoteque. But then, you wouldn’t have expected how soon and how thoroughly they challenged Europe’s best hatches with the new i30.

    You wouldn’t have expected the Veloster before it happened. This is a name on the move.

    When exactly it starts competing isn’t sure. The FIA has to give it an entry, and while that might be some of the later 2013 rallies, it might be 2014. Whatever, Hyundai will be diligently testing ‘til they’re allowed out in anger. The car will have Hyundai’s own 1.6 turbo engine and a proprietary rally gearbox and 4WD.

    The team will be based in Germany, but the rally car’s basic design and engineering is already being designed in Korea. There are no drivers recruited yet, but we were told: “We know a good driver makes all the difference, and we’re in this to win.”

    And even if you don’t follow rallying (why not?) this is good news. Already a team of engineers has been recruited whose specific job is to feed back from the rally car into road cars. Allan Rushforth, chief of Hyundai Europe, tells us they want to have more hot cars. To make them better, they listen to what we say and now they’re listening to what rally drivers say.

    Some of history’s great road cars have come out of rallying - the Escort Cosworth, Lancia Integrale, the Audi Quattro, the Impreza Turbo, the Mitsubishi Evo. A bunch of engineers trying to make another sounds OK to us.

    Paul Horrell

  8. The World Rally Championship always needs more entrants. So be glad here’s another: Hyundai. They’ll be entering this supernaturally hormonal i20.

    Sure, right now Hyundai might not be the nameplate you most naturally associate with popping hissing turbos, or getting big air, or cornering via the driftoteque. But then, you wouldn’t have expected how soon and how thoroughly they challenged Europe’s best hatches with the new i30.

    You wouldn’t have expected the Veloster before it happened. This is a name on the move.

    When exactly it starts competing isn’t sure. The FIA has to give it an entry, and while that might be some of the later 2013 rallies, it might be 2014. Whatever, Hyundai will be diligently testing ‘til they’re allowed out in anger. The car will have Hyundai’s own 1.6 turbo engine and a proprietary rally gearbox and 4WD.

    The team will be based in Germany, but the rally car’s basic design and engineering is already being designed in Korea. There are no drivers recruited yet, but we were told: “We know a good driver makes all the difference, and we’re in this to win.”

    And even if you don’t follow rallying (why not?) this is good news. Already a team of engineers has been recruited whose specific job is to feed back from the rally car into road cars. Allan Rushforth, chief of Hyundai Europe, tells us they want to have more hot cars. To make them better, they listen to what we say and now they’re listening to what rally drivers say.

    Some of history’s great road cars have come out of rallying - the Escort Cosworth, Lancia Integrale, the Audi Quattro, the Impreza Turbo, the Mitsubishi Evo. A bunch of engineers trying to make another sounds OK to us.

    Paul Horrell

What do you think?

This service is provided by Disqus and is subject to their privacy policy and terms of use. Please read Top Gear’s code of conduct (link below) before posting.

Promoted content