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Rolls unveils Art Deco-inspired cars

  1. Without wishing to sound too much like Mark Lawson, the Art Deco movement was the first in which machines, cars and even the straight line became a source of great beauty. The phrase Art Deco was even coined at a show that celebrated the arts and their industrial application mutually - the 1925 Paris Exhibition, or Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes.

    And these three cars are Rolls-Royce’s homage to the movement, all of which are finished in period-perfect colours and feature bespokery that honours it. The black Phant’s got an arctic white interior with stainless steel inlays, door cappings and an inlayed rear picnic table. There’s also Deco-style geometric coachline pattern across its innards, which was conceived and used by Rolls-Royce on a show stand at Olympia in the early 20th century.

    The two-tone jubilee silver and cobalto blue Ghost gets an interior stuffed with marquetry - that means delicately veneered patterns made up of little bits of wood. The Drophead Coupé gets mother of pearl inlays and that really quite handsome powder-blue paint.

    Like ‘em? The trio showcase a new line of Phantom Saloon and Ghost trim levels that (the very rich) public can buy for themselves. Phantoms come in infinity black, Arabian blue, powder blue or Arctic white, and feature a bespoke, twin coachline with an Art Deco motif and an illuminated Spirit of Ecstasy (just like the Art Deco glassware you got in the period). Inside there’s Art Deco headrest embroidery, bespoke inlays on piano black veneer and tread plates with an Art Deco logo.

    Ghosts come in either infinity black or arctic white with a dual coach line and illuminated Spirit of Ecstasy. Inside there are Art Deco inlays, that Olympia-inspired design on the tread plates and headrest embroidery. The leather’s black and white and you can choose from four seat piping colours.

    Giles Taylor, Design Director Rolls-Royce Motor Cars, says “Art Deco was defined by theatre, glamour and a sense of excitement. Working to create contemporary interpretations of these classic themes has been enormously rewarding for everyone in my bespoke design team.” Jolly good. 

    Anyone for a Mark Lawson-spec Roller?

  2. Without wishing to sound too much like Mark Lawson, the Art Deco movement was the first in which machines, cars and even the straight line became a source of great beauty. The phrase Art Deco was even coined at a show that celebrated the arts and their industrial application mutually - the 1925 Paris Exhibition, or Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes.

    And these three cars are Rolls-Royce’s homage to the movement, all of which are finished in period-perfect colours and feature bespokery that honours it. The black Phant’s got an arctic white interior with stainless steel inlays, door cappings and an inlayed rear picnic table. There’s also Deco-style geometric coachline pattern across its innards, which was conceived and used by Rolls-Royce on a show stand at Olympia in the early 20th century.

    The two-tone jubilee silver and cobalto blue Ghost gets an interior stuffed with marquetry - that means delicately veneered patterns made up of little bits of wood. The Drophead Coupé gets mother of pearl inlays and that really quite handsome powder-blue paint.

    Like ‘em? The trio showcase a new line of Phantom Saloon and Ghost trim levels that (the very rich) public can buy for themselves. Phantoms come in infinity black, Arabian blue, powder blue or Arctic white, and feature a bespoke, twin coachline with an Art Deco motif and an illuminated Spirit of Ecstasy (just like the Art Deco glassware you got in the period). Inside there’s Art Deco headrest embroidery, bespoke inlays on piano black veneer and tread plates with an Art Deco logo.

    Ghosts come in either infinity black or arctic white with a dual coach line and illuminated Spirit of Ecstasy. Inside there are Art Deco inlays, that Olympia-inspired design on the tread plates and headrest embroidery. The leather’s black and white and you can choose from four seat piping colours.

    Giles Taylor, Design Director Rolls-Royce Motor Cars, says “Art Deco was defined by theatre, glamour and a sense of excitement. Working to create contemporary interpretations of these classic themes has been enormously rewarding for everyone in my bespoke design team.” Jolly good.

    Anyone for a Mark Lawson-spec Roller?

  3. Without wishing to sound too much like Mark Lawson, the Art Deco movement was the first in which machines, cars and even the straight line became a source of great beauty. The phrase Art Deco was even coined at a show that celebrated the arts and their industrial application mutually - the 1925 Paris Exhibition, or Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes.

    And these three cars are Rolls-Royce’s homage to the movement, all of which are finished in period-perfect colours and feature bespokery that honours it. The black Phant’s got an arctic white interior with stainless steel inlays, door cappings and an inlayed rear picnic table. There’s also Deco-style geometric coachline pattern across its innards, which was conceived and used by Rolls-Royce on a show stand at Olympia in the early 20th century.

    The two-tone jubilee silver and cobalto blue Ghost gets an interior stuffed with marquetry - that means delicately veneered patterns made up of little bits of wood. The Drophead Coupé gets mother of pearl inlays and that really quite handsome powder-blue paint. 

    Like ‘em? The trio showcase a new line of Phantom Saloon and Ghost trim levels that (the very rich) public can buy for themselves. Phantoms come in infinity black, Arabian blue, powder blue or Arctic white, and feature a bespoke, twin coachline with an Art Deco motif and an illuminated Spirit of Ecstasy (just like the Art Deco glassware you got in the period). Inside there’s Art Deco headrest embroidery, bespoke inlays on piano black veneer and tread plates with an Art Deco logo.

    Ghosts come in either infinity black or arctic white with a dual coach line and illuminated Spirit of Ecstasy. Inside there are Art Deco inlays, that Olympia-inspired design on the tread plates and headrest embroidery. The leather’s black and white and you can choose from four seat piping colours.

    Giles Taylor, Design Director Rolls-Royce Motor Cars, says “Art Deco was defined by theatre, glamour and a sense of excitement. Working to create contemporary interpretations of these classic themes has been enormously rewarding for everyone in my bespoke design team.” Jolly good. 

    Anyone for a Mark Lawson-spec Roller?

  4. Without wishing to sound too much like Mark Lawson, the Art Deco movement was the first in which machines, cars and even the straight line became a source of great beauty. The phrase Art Deco was even coined at a show that celebrated the arts and their industrial application mutually - the 1925 Paris Exhibition, or Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes.

    And these three cars are Rolls-Royce’s homage to the movement, all of which are finished in period-perfect colours and feature bespokery that honours it. The black Phant’s got an arctic white interior with stainless steel inlays, door cappings and an inlayed rear picnic table. There’s also Deco-style geometric coachline pattern across its innards, which was conceived and used by Rolls-Royce on a show stand at Olympia in the early 20th century.

    The two-tone jubilee silver and cobalto blue Ghost gets an interior stuffed with marquetry - that means delicately veneered patterns made up of little bits of wood. The Drophead Coupé gets mother of pearl inlays and that really quite handsome powder-blue paint. 

    Like ‘em? The trio showcase a new line of Phantom Saloon and Ghost trim levels that (the very rich) public can buy for themselves. Phantoms come in infinity black, Arabian blue, powder blue or Arctic white, and feature a bespoke, twin coachline with an Art Deco motif and an illuminated Spirit of Ecstasy (just like the Art Deco glassware you got in the period). Inside there’s Art Deco headrest embroidery, bespoke inlays on piano black veneer and tread plates with an Art Deco logo.

    Ghosts come in either infinity black or arctic white with a dual coach line and illuminated Spirit of Ecstasy. Inside there are Art Deco inlays, that Olympia-inspired design on the tread plates and headrest embroidery. The leather’s black and white and you can choose from four seat piping colours.

    Giles Taylor, Design Director Rolls-Royce Motor Cars, says “Art Deco was defined by theatre, glamour and a sense of excitement. Working to create contemporary interpretations of these classic themes has been enormously rewarding for everyone in my bespoke design team.” Jolly good. 

    Anyone for a Mark Lawson-spec Roller?

  5. Without wishing to sound too much like Mark Lawson, the Art Deco movement was the first in which machines, cars and even the straight line became a source of great beauty. The phrase Art Deco was even coined at a show that celebrated the arts and their industrial application mutually - the 1925 Paris Exhibition, or Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes.

    And these three cars are Rolls-Royce’s homage to the movement, all of which are finished in period-perfect colours and feature bespokery that honours it. The black Phant’s got an arctic white interior with stainless steel inlays, door cappings and an inlayed rear picnic table. There’s also Deco-style geometric coachline pattern across its innards, which was conceived and used by Rolls-Royce on a show stand at Olympia in the early 20th century.

    The two-tone jubilee silver and cobalto blue Ghost gets an interior stuffed with marquetry - that means delicately veneered patterns made up of little bits of wood. The Drophead Coupé gets mother of pearl inlays and that really quite handsome powder-blue paint. 

    Like ‘em? The trio showcase a new line of Phantom Saloon and Ghost trim levels that (the very rich) public can buy for themselves. Phantoms come in infinity black, Arabian blue, powder blue or Arctic white, and feature a bespoke, twin coachline with an Art Deco motif and an illuminated Spirit of Ecstasy (just like the Art Deco glassware you got in the period). Inside there’s Art Deco headrest embroidery, bespoke inlays on piano black veneer and tread plates with an Art Deco logo.

    Ghosts come in either infinity black or arctic white with a dual coach line and illuminated Spirit of Ecstasy. Inside there are Art Deco inlays, that Olympia-inspired design on the tread plates and headrest embroidery. The leather’s black and white and you can choose from four seat piping colours.

    Giles Taylor, Design Director Rolls-Royce Motor Cars, says “Art Deco was defined by theatre, glamour and a sense of excitement. Working to create contemporary interpretations of these classic themes has been enormously rewarding for everyone in my bespoke design team.” Jolly good. 

    Anyone for a Mark Lawson-spec Roller?

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