Rowan Horncastle09 May 2012

Behold! The 'Fahrradi FFX' push bike

Hammond’s pedal-powered Porsche has some competition...

The Ferrari FXX was once the fastest car to (illegally) lap our test track. The Ferdinand Ferdinand GT3 RS is the slowest car to lap our test track. So what happens if the two engage in a bit of cross-fertilisation? Well, this... The Fahrradi Farfall FFX.

It may look like Ferrari's V12, Enzo-based hypercar, but it's actually a bicycle cocooned with some well-placed tin foil. It's the idea of Austrian bicyclist, Hannes Langeder, the very man who built the lightest of lightweight GT3 RS that Hammond cycled around our test track.

This one took him a year to build and has notable improvements, such as gullwing doors that flap when the car/bike is being pedaled. Langeder believes that it's actually possible for the FFX to "lift off slightly from the ground". Yes, you read that right. This car has the potential to fly.

See more pics of the Fahrradi Farfall FFX

The real Ferrari FXX is equipped with a gearbox that incorporates the latest developments from Ferrari's F1 program, and has a shift time of under 100 ms. The FFX bike/car has an 11-speed effort from a bike, with a shift time of ‘however long it takes you to move your thumb from left-to-right without the chain coming off'. The chain-powered FFX does win on weight however: around 100kg thanks to its lightweight plastic-tubed body and steel chassis.

The other main difference between the two is in the engine department. Both are naturally aspirated, but one is in the shape of two people while the other is a 789bhp V12.

Unfortunately this bike does cost a lot more than that Raleigh Chopper Santa never brought you. How much? One point two MILLION pounds. Unbelievably, that's in the ballpark of an actual Ferrari FXX, never the cheapest motoring option. Still, at least you can drive this one on the streets. And if you believe the video below, it can also do a loop of a tunnel... 

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