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Audi Crosslane Coupe concept

  1. In terms of size and looks, this is pretty close to the rumoured Q2, Audi’s tiniest crossover. In terms of everything else, it categorically, resolutely is not.

    Firstly, there’s the body configuration - as well as a sliding seat the Crosslane has a carbon-heavy multi-material space frame, which also uses aluminium, and glass fibre-reinforced polymer. The astronomical cost of producing something like this means it’ll probably only appear on eco-specials or supercars, not a mainstream crossover.

    Secondly, there are seats. The boot makes up a separate bit in the body structure, which is attached to the backs of the rear chairs independently from the cushions. Press a button and the whole unit hums forwards 40 cm for flat storage. Which also won’t happen, because the Q2 won’t have a separate bit in the body structure because it won’t sit on a multimaterial space frame.

    Thirdly, there is a removable targa roof panel. Nobody will buy a car with a removable targa panel because they’ll look a bit foolish when they’re driving down the road.

    Finally, the drive train. It’s a plug-in hybrid that uses a 1.5-litre three-cylinder TFSI petrol engine with two electric motors, promising potential fuel economy equivalent to 256.8 mpg with CO2 emissions of 26 grams per km, also helped by its diminutive 1,390 kg heft.

    Only thing is, the head of development at VAG told us that this isn’t the plug-in hybrid powertrain that Audi will be investing in. That one’s a diesel with a seven-speed DSG and an electric motor incorporated into the gearbox.

    Is there anything useful about it? Well, its 4.21 metre length, 1.88 metre width, 1.51 metre height and 2.56 meter wheelbase tells us roughly how big the Q2’s going to be. Otherwise? It’s a definite concept. 

  2. In terms of size and looks, this is pretty close to the rumoured Q2, Audi’s tiniest crossover. In terms of everything else, it categorically, resolutely is not.

    Firstly, there’s the body configuration - as well as a sliding seat the Crosslane has a carbon-heavy multi-material space frame, which also uses aluminium, and glass fibre-reinforced polymer. The astronomical cost of producing something like this means it’ll probably only appear on eco-specials or supercars, not a mainstream crossover.

    Secondly, there are seats. The boot makes up a separate bit in the body structure, which is attached to the backs of the rear chairs independently from the cushions. Press a button and the whole unit hums forwards 40 cm for flat storage. Which also won’t happen, because the Q2 won’t have a separate bit in the body structure because it won’t sit on a multimaterial space frame.

    Thirdly, there is a removable targa roof panel. Nobody will buy a car with a removable targa panel because they’ll look a bit foolish when they’re driving down the road.

    Finally, the drive train. It’s a plug-in hybrid that uses a 1.5-litre three-cylinder TFSI petrol engine with two electric motors, promising potential fuel economy equivalent to 256.8 mpg with CO2 emissions of 26 grams per km, also helped by its diminutive 1,390 kg heft.

    Only thing is, the head of development at VAG told us that this isn’t the plug-in hybrid powertrain that Audi will be investing in. That one’s a diesel with a seven-speed DSG and an electric motor incorporated into the gearbox.

    Is there anything useful about it? Well, its 4.21 metre length, 1.88 metre width, 1.51 metre height and 2.56 meter wheelbase tells us roughly how big the Q2’s going to be. Otherwise? It’s a definite concept. 

  3. In terms of size and looks, this is pretty close to the rumoured Q2, Audi’s tiniest crossover. In terms of everything else, it categorically, resolutely is not.

    Firstly, there’s the body configuration - as well as a sliding seat the Crosslane has a carbon-heavy multi-material space frame, which also uses aluminium, and glass fibre-reinforced polymer. The astronomical cost of producing something like this means it’ll probably only appear on eco-specials or supercars, not a mainstream crossover.

    Secondly, there are seats. The boot makes up a separate bit in the body structure, which is attached to the backs of the rear chairs independently from the cushions. Press a button and the whole unit hums forwards 40 cm for flat storage. Which also won’t happen, because the Q2 won’t have a separate bit in the body structure because it won’t sit on a multimaterial space frame.

    Thirdly, there is a removable targa roof panel. Nobody will buy a car with a removable targa panel because they’ll look a bit foolish when they’re driving down the road.

    Finally, the drive train. It’s a plug-in hybrid that uses a 1.5-litre three-cylinder TFSI petrol engine with two electric motors, promising potential fuel economy equivalent to 256.8 mpg with CO2 emissions of 26 grams per km, also helped by its diminutive 1,390 kg heft.

    Only thing is, the head of development at VAG told us that this isn’t the plug-in hybrid powertrain that Audi will be investing in. That one’s a diesel with a seven-speed DSG and an electric motor incorporated into the gearbox.

    Is there anything useful about it? Well, its 4.21 metre length, 1.88 metre width, 1.51 metre height and 2.56 meter wheelbase tells us roughly how big the Q2’s going to be. Otherwise? It’s a definite concept. 

  4. In terms of size and looks, this is pretty close to the rumoured Q2, Audi’s tiniest crossover. In terms of everything else, it categorically, resolutely is not.

    Firstly, there’s the body configuration - as well as a sliding seat the Crosslane has a carbon-heavy multi-material space frame, which also uses aluminium, and glass fibre-reinforced polymer. The astronomical cost of producing something like this means it’ll probably only appear on eco-specials or supercars, not a mainstream crossover.

    Secondly, there are seats. The boot makes up a separate bit in the body structure, which is attached to the backs of the rear chairs independently from the cushions. Press a button and the whole unit hums forwards 40 cm for flat storage. Which also won’t happen, because the Q2 won’t have a separate bit in the body structure because it won’t sit on a multimaterial space frame.

    Thirdly, there is a removable targa roof panel. Nobody will buy a car with a removable targa panel because they’ll look a bit foolish when they’re driving down the road.

    Finally, the drive train. It’s a plug-in hybrid that uses a 1.5-litre three-cylinder TFSI petrol engine with two electric motors, promising potential fuel economy equivalent to 256.8 mpg with CO2 emissions of 26 grams per km, also helped by its diminutive 1,390 kg heft.

    Only thing is, the head of development at VAG told us that this isn’t the plug-in hybrid powertrain that Audi will be investing in. That one’s a diesel with a seven-speed DSG and an electric motor incorporated into the gearbox.

    Is there anything useful about it? Well, its 4.21 metre length, 1.88 metre width, 1.51 metre height and 2.56 meter wheelbase tells us roughly how big the Q2’s going to be. Otherwise? It’s a definite concept. 

  5. In terms of size and looks, this is pretty close to the rumoured Q2, Audi’s tiniest crossover. In terms of everything else, it categorically, resolutely is not.

    Firstly, there’s the body configuration - as well as a sliding seat the Crosslane has a carbon-heavy multi-material space frame, which also uses aluminium, and glass fibre-reinforced polymer. The astronomical cost of producing something like this means it’ll probably only appear on eco-specials or supercars, not a mainstream crossover.

    Secondly, there are seats. The boot makes up a separate bit in the body structure, which is attached to the backs of the rear chairs independently from the cushions. Press a button and the whole unit hums forwards 40 cm for flat storage. Which also won’t happen, because the Q2 won’t have a separate bit in the body structure because it won’t sit on a multimaterial space frame.

    Thirdly, there is a removable targa roof panel. Nobody will buy a car with a removable targa panel because they’ll look a bit foolish when they’re driving down the road.

    Finally, the drive train. It’s a plug-in hybrid that uses a 1.5-litre three-cylinder TFSI petrol engine with two electric motors, promising potential fuel economy equivalent to 256.8 mpg with CO2 emissions of 26 grams per km, also helped by its diminutive 1,390 kg heft.

    Only thing is, the head of development at VAG told us that this isn’t the plug-in hybrid powertrain that Audi will be investing in. That one’s a diesel with a seven-speed DSG and an electric motor incorporated into the gearbox.

    Is there anything useful about it? Well, its 4.21 metre length, 1.88 metre width, 1.51 metre height and 2.56 meter wheelbase tells us roughly how big the Q2’s going to be. Otherwise? It’s a definite concept. 

  6. In terms of size and looks, this is pretty close to the rumoured Q2, Audi’s tiniest crossover. In terms of everything else, it categorically, resolutely is not.

    Firstly, there’s the body configuration - as well as a sliding seat the Crosslane has a carbon-heavy multi-material space frame, which also uses aluminium, and glass fibre-reinforced polymer. The astronomical cost of producing something like this means it’ll probably only appear on eco-specials or supercars, not a mainstream crossover.

    Secondly, there are seats. The boot makes up a separate bit in the body structure, which is attached to the backs of the rear chairs independently from the cushions. Press a button and the whole unit hums forwards 40 cm for flat storage. Which also won’t happen, because the Q2 won’t have a separate bit in the body structure because it won’t sit on a multimaterial space frame.

    Thirdly, there is a removable targa roof panel. Nobody will buy a car with a removable targa panel because they’ll look a bit foolish when they’re driving down the road.

    Finally, the drive train. It’s a plug-in hybrid that uses a 1.5-litre three-cylinder TFSI petrol engine with two electric motors, promising potential fuel economy equivalent to 256.8 mpg with CO2 emissions of 26 grams per km, also helped by its diminutive 1,390 kg heft.

    Only thing is, the head of development at VAG told us that this isn’t the plug-in hybrid powertrain that Audi will be investing in. That one’s a diesel with a seven-speed DSG and an electric motor incorporated into the gearbox.

    Is there anything useful about it? Well, its 4.21 metre length, 1.88 metre width, 1.51 metre height and 2.56 meter wheelbase tells us roughly how big the Q2’s going to be. Otherwise? It’s a definite concept. 

  7. In terms of size and looks, this is pretty close to the rumoured Q2, Audi’s tiniest crossover. In terms of everything else, it categorically, resolutely is not.

    Firstly, there’s the body configuration - as well as a sliding seat the Crosslane has a carbon-heavy multi-material space frame, which also uses aluminium, and glass fibre-reinforced polymer. The astronomical cost of producing something like this means it’ll probably only appear on eco-specials or supercars, not a mainstream crossover.

    Secondly, there are seats. The boot makes up a separate bit in the body structure, which is attached to the backs of the rear chairs independently from the cushions. Press a button and the whole unit hums forwards 40 cm for flat storage. Which also won’t happen, because the Q2 won’t have a separate bit in the body structure because it won’t sit on a multimaterial space frame.

    Thirdly, there is a removable targa roof panel. Nobody will buy a car with a removable targa panel because they’ll look a bit foolish when they’re driving down the road.

    Finally, the drive train. It’s a plug-in hybrid that uses a 1.5-litre three-cylinder TFSI petrol engine with two electric motors, promising potential fuel economy equivalent to 256.8 mpg with CO2 emissions of 26 grams per km, also helped by its diminutive 1,390 kg heft.

    Only thing is, the head of development at VAG told us that this isn’t the plug-in hybrid powertrain that Audi will be investing in. That one’s a diesel with a seven-speed DSG and an electric motor incorporated into the gearbox.

    Is there anything useful about it? Well, its 4.21 metre length, 1.88 metre width, 1.51 metre height and 2.56 meter wheelbase tells us roughly how big the Q2’s going to be. Otherwise? It’s a definite concept. 

  8. In terms of size and looks, this is pretty close to the rumoured Q2, Audi’s tiniest crossover. In terms of everything else, it categorically, resolutely is not.

    Firstly, there’s the body configuration - as well as a sliding seat the Crosslane has a carbon-heavy multi-material space frame, which also uses aluminium, and glass fibre-reinforced polymer. The astronomical cost of producing something like this means it’ll probably only appear on eco-specials or supercars, not a mainstream crossover.

    Secondly, there are seats. The boot makes up a separate bit in the body structure, which is attached to the backs of the rear chairs independently from the cushions. Press a button and the whole unit hums forwards 40 cm for flat storage. Which also won’t happen, because the Q2 won’t have a separate bit in the body structure because it won’t sit on a multimaterial space frame.

    Thirdly, there is a removable targa roof panel. Nobody will buy a car with a removable targa panel because they’ll look a bit foolish when they’re driving down the road.

    Finally, the drive train. It’s a plug-in hybrid that uses a 1.5-litre three-cylinder TFSI petrol engine with two electric motors, promising potential fuel economy equivalent to 256.8 mpg with CO2 emissions of 26 grams per km, also helped by its diminutive 1,390 kg heft.

    Only thing is, the head of development at VAG told us that this isn’t the plug-in hybrid powertrain that Audi will be investing in. That one’s a diesel with a seven-speed DSG and an electric motor incorporated into the gearbox.

    Is there anything useful about it? Well, its 4.21 metre length, 1.88 metre width, 1.51 metre height and 2.56 meter wheelbase tells us roughly how big the Q2’s going to be. Otherwise? It’s a definite concept. 

  9. In terms of size and looks, this is pretty close to the rumoured Q2, Audi’s tiniest crossover. In terms of everything else, it categorically, resolutely is not.

    Firstly, there’s the body configuration - as well as a sliding seat the Crosslane has a carbon-heavy multi-material space frame, which also uses aluminium, and glass fibre-reinforced polymer. The astronomical cost of producing something like this means it’ll probably only appear on eco-specials or supercars, not a mainstream crossover.

    Secondly, there are seats. The boot makes up a separate bit in the body structure, which is attached to the backs of the rear chairs independently from the cushions. Press a button and the whole unit hums forwards 40 cm for flat storage. Which also won’t happen, because the Q2 won’t have a separate bit in the body structure because it won’t sit on a multimaterial space frame.

    Thirdly, there is a removable targa roof panel. Nobody will buy a car with a removable targa panel because they’ll look a bit foolish when they’re driving down the road.

    Finally, the drive train. It’s a plug-in hybrid that uses a 1.5-litre three-cylinder TFSI petrol engine with two electric motors, promising potential fuel economy equivalent to 256.8 mpg with CO2 emissions of 26 grams per km, also helped by its diminutive 1,390 kg heft.

    Only thing is, the head of development at VAG told us that this isn’t the plug-in hybrid powertrain that Audi will be investing in. That one’s a diesel with a seven-speed DSG and an electric motor incorporated into the gearbox.

    Is there anything useful about it? Well, its 4.21 metre length, 1.88 metre width, 1.51 metre height and 2.56 meter wheelbase tells us roughly how big the Q2’s going to be. Otherwise? It’s a definite concept. 

  10. In terms of size and looks, this is pretty close to the rumoured Q2, Audi’s tiniest crossover. In terms of everything else, it categorically, resolutely is not.

    Firstly, there’s the body configuration - as well as a sliding seat the Crosslane has a carbon-heavy multi-material space frame, which also uses aluminium, and glass fibre-reinforced polymer. The astronomical cost of producing something like this means it’ll probably only appear on eco-specials or supercars, not a mainstream crossover.

    Secondly, there are seats. The boot makes up a separate bit in the body structure, which is attached to the backs of the rear chairs independently from the cushions. Press a button and the whole unit hums forwards 40 cm for flat storage. Which also won’t happen, because the Q2 won’t have a separate bit in the body structure because it won’t sit on a multimaterial space frame.

    Thirdly, there is a removable targa roof panel. Nobody will buy a car with a removable targa panel because they’ll look a bit foolish when they’re driving down the road.

    Finally, the drive train. It’s a plug-in hybrid that uses a 1.5-litre three-cylinder TFSI petrol engine with two electric motors, promising potential fuel economy equivalent to 256.8 mpg with CO2 emissions of 26 grams per km, also helped by its diminutive 1,390 kg heft.

    Only thing is, the head of development at VAG told us that this isn’t the plug-in hybrid powertrain that Audi will be investing in. That one’s a diesel with a seven-speed DSG and an electric motor incorporated into the gearbox.

    Is there anything useful about it? Well, its 4.21 metre length, 1.88 metre width, 1.51 metre height and 2.56 meter wheelbase tells us roughly how big the Q2’s going to be. Otherwise? It’s a definite concept. 

  11. In terms of size and looks, this is pretty close to the rumoured Q2, Audi’s tiniest crossover. In terms of everything else, it categorically, resolutely is not.

    Firstly, there’s the body configuration - as well as a sliding seat the Crosslane has a carbon-heavy multi-material space frame, which also uses aluminium, and glass fibre-reinforced polymer. The astronomical cost of producing something like this means it’ll probably only appear on eco-specials or supercars, not a mainstream crossover.

    Secondly, there are seats. The boot makes up a separate bit in the body structure, which is attached to the backs of the rear chairs independently from the cushions. Press a button and the whole unit hums forwards 40 cm for flat storage. Which also won’t happen, because the Q2 won’t have a separate bit in the body structure because it won’t sit on a multimaterial space frame.

    Thirdly, there is a removable targa roof panel. Nobody will buy a car with a removable targa panel because they’ll look a bit foolish when they’re driving down the road.

    Finally, the drive train. It’s a plug-in hybrid that uses a 1.5-litre three-cylinder TFSI petrol engine with two electric motors, promising potential fuel economy equivalent to 256.8 mpg with CO2 emissions of 26 grams per km, also helped by its diminutive 1,390 kg heft.

    Only thing is, the head of development at VAG told us that this isn’t the plug-in hybrid powertrain that Audi will be investing in. That one’s a diesel with a seven-speed DSG and an electric motor incorporated into the gearbox.

    Is there anything useful about it? Well, its 4.21 metre length, 1.88 metre width, 1.51 metre height and 2.56 meter wheelbase tells us roughly how big the Q2’s going to be. Otherwise? It’s a definite concept. 

  12. In terms of size and looks, this is pretty close to the rumoured Q2, Audi’s tiniest crossover. In terms of everything else, it categorically, resolutely is not.

    Firstly, there’s the body configuration - as well as a sliding seat the Crosslane has a carbon-heavy multi-material space frame, which also uses aluminium, and glass fibre-reinforced polymer. The astronomical cost of producing something like this means it’ll probably only appear on eco-specials or supercars, not a mainstream crossover.

    Secondly, there are seats. The boot makes up a separate bit in the body structure, which is attached to the backs of the rear chairs independently from the cushions. Press a button and the whole unit hums forwards 40 cm for flat storage. Which also won’t happen, because the Q2 won’t have a separate bit in the body structure because it won’t sit on a multimaterial space frame.

    Thirdly, there is a removable targa roof panel. Nobody will buy a car with a removable targa panel because they’ll look a bit foolish when they’re driving down the road.

    Finally, the drive train. It’s a plug-in hybrid that uses a 1.5-litre three-cylinder TFSI petrol engine with two electric motors, promising potential fuel economy equivalent to 256.8 mpg with CO2 emissions of 26 grams per km, also helped by its diminutive 1,390 kg heft.

    Only thing is, the head of development at VAG told us that this isn’t the plug-in hybrid powertrain that Audi will be investing in. That one’s a diesel with a seven-speed DSG and an electric motor incorporated into the gearbox.

    Is there anything useful about it? Well, its 4.21 metre length, 1.88 metre width, 1.51 metre height and 2.56 meter wheelbase tells us roughly how big the Q2’s going to be. Otherwise? It’s a definite concept. 

  13. In terms of size and looks, this is pretty close to the rumoured Q2, Audi’s tiniest crossover. In terms of everything else, it categorically, resolutely is not.

    Firstly, there’s the body configuration - as well as a sliding seat the Crosslane has a carbon-heavy multi-material space frame, which also uses aluminium, and glass fibre-reinforced polymer. The astronomical cost of producing something like this means it’ll probably only appear on eco-specials or supercars, not a mainstream crossover.

    Secondly, there are seats. The boot makes up a separate bit in the body structure, which is attached to the backs of the rear chairs independently from the cushions. Press a button and the whole unit hums forwards 40 cm for flat storage. Which also won’t happen, because the Q2 won’t have a separate bit in the body structure because it won’t sit on a multimaterial space frame.

    Thirdly, there is a removable targa roof panel. Nobody will buy a car with a removable targa panel because they’ll look a bit foolish when they’re driving down the road.

    Finally, the drive train. It’s a plug-in hybrid that uses a 1.5-litre three-cylinder TFSI petrol engine with two electric motors, promising potential fuel economy equivalent to 256.8 mpg with CO2 emissions of 26 grams per km, also helped by its diminutive 1,390 kg heft.

    Only thing is, the head of development at VAG told us that this isn’t the plug-in hybrid powertrain that Audi will be investing in. That one’s a diesel with a seven-speed DSG and an electric motor incorporated into the gearbox.

    Is there anything useful about it? Well, its 4.21 metre length, 1.88 metre width, 1.51 metre height and 2.56 meter wheelbase tells us roughly how big the Q2’s going to be. Otherwise? It’s a definite concept. 

  14. In terms of size and looks, this is pretty close to the forthcoming Q2, Audi’s tiniest crossover. In terms of everything else, it categorically, resolutely is not.

    Firstly, there’s the silly body configuration - as well as a sliding seat the Crosslane has a carbon-heavy multi-material space frame, which also uses aluminium, and glass fibre-reinforced polymer. The astronomical cost of producing something like this means it’ll probably only appear on eco-specials or supercars, not a mainstream crossover.

    Secondly, there are silly seats. The boot makes up a separate bit in the body structure, which is attached to the backs of the rear chairs independently from the cushions. Press a button and the whole unit hums forwards 40 cm for flat storage. Which also won’t happen, because the Q2 won’t have a separate bit in the body structure because it won’t sit on a multimaterial space frame.

    Thirdly, there is a silly removable targa roof panel. Nobody will buy a car with a silly removable targa panel because they’ll look like an idiot when they’re driving down the road.

    Finally, the drive train. It’s a plug-in hybrid effort that uses a 1.5-litre three-cylinder TFSI petrol engine with two electric motors, promising potential fuel economy equivalent to 256.8 mpg with CO2 emissions of 26 grams per km, also helped by its diminutive 1,390 kg heft.

    Only thing is, the head of development at VAG told us that this isn’t the plug-in hybrid powertrain that Audi will be investing in. That one’s a diesel with a seven-speed DSG and an electric motor incorporated into the gearbox.

    Is there anything useful about it? Well, its 4.21 metre length, 1.88 metre width, 1.51 metre height and 2.56 meter wheelbase tells us roughly how big the Q2’s going to be. Otherwise? No.

  15. In terms of size and looks, this is pretty close to the rumoured Q2, Audi’s tiniest crossover. In terms of everything else, it categorically, resolutely is not.

    Firstly, there’s the body configuration - as well as a sliding seat the Crosslane has a carbon-heavy multi-material space frame, which also uses aluminium, and glass fibre-reinforced polymer. The astronomical cost of producing something like this means it’ll probably only appear on eco-specials or supercars, not a mainstream crossover.

    Secondly, there are seats. The boot makes up a separate bit in the body structure, which is attached to the backs of the rear chairs independently from the cushions. Press a button and the whole unit hums forwards 40 cm for flat storage. Which also won’t happen, because the Q2 won’t have a separate bit in the body structure because it won’t sit on a multimaterial space frame.

    Thirdly, there is a removable targa roof panel. Nobody will buy a car with a removable targa panel because they’ll look a bit foolish when they’re driving down the road.

    Finally, the drive train. It’s a plug-in hybrid that uses a 1.5-litre three-cylinder TFSI petrol engine with two electric motors, promising potential fuel economy equivalent to 256.8 mpg with CO2 emissions of 26 grams per km, also helped by its diminutive 1,390 kg heft.

    Only thing is, the head of development at VAG told us that this isn’t the plug-in hybrid powertrain that Audi will be investing in. That one’s a diesel with a seven-speed DSG and an electric motor incorporated into the gearbox.

    Is there anything useful about it? Well, its 4.21 metre length, 1.88 metre width, 1.51 metre height and 2.56 meter wheelbase tells us roughly how big the Q2’s going to be. Otherwise? It’s a definite concept. 

  16. In terms of size and looks, this is pretty close to the rumoured Q2, Audi’s tiniest crossover. In terms of everything else, it categorically, resolutely is not.

    Firstly, there’s the body configuration - as well as a sliding seat the Crosslane has a carbon-heavy multi-material space frame, which also uses aluminium, and glass fibre-reinforced polymer. The astronomical cost of producing something like this means it’ll probably only appear on eco-specials or supercars, not a mainstream crossover.

    Secondly, there are seats. The boot makes up a separate bit in the body structure, which is attached to the backs of the rear chairs independently from the cushions. Press a button and the whole unit hums forwards 40 cm for flat storage. Which also won’t happen, because the Q2 won’t have a separate bit in the body structure because it won’t sit on a multimaterial space frame.

    Thirdly, there is a removable targa roof panel. Nobody will buy a car with a removable targa panel because they’ll look a bit foolish when they’re driving down the road.

    Finally, the drive train. It’s a plug-in hybrid that uses a 1.5-litre three-cylinder TFSI petrol engine with two electric motors, promising potential fuel economy equivalent to 256.8 mpg with CO2 emissions of 26 grams per km, also helped by its diminutive 1,390 kg heft.

    Only thing is, the head of development at VAG told us that this isn’t the plug-in hybrid powertrain that Audi will be investing in. That one’s a diesel with a seven-speed DSG and an electric motor incorporated into the gearbox.

    Is there anything useful about it? Well, its 4.21 metre length, 1.88 metre width, 1.51 metre height and 2.56 meter wheelbase tells us roughly how big the Q2’s going to be. Otherwise? It’s a definite concept. 

  17. In terms of size and looks, this is pretty close to the rumoured Q2, Audi’s tiniest crossover. In terms of everything else, it categorically, resolutely is not.

    Firstly, there’s the body configuration - as well as a sliding seat the Crosslane has a carbon-heavy multi-material space frame, which also uses aluminium, and glass fibre-reinforced polymer. The astronomical cost of producing something like this means it’ll probably only appear on eco-specials or supercars, not a mainstream crossover.

    Secondly, there are seats. The boot makes up a separate bit in the body structure, which is attached to the backs of the rear chairs independently from the cushions. Press a button and the whole unit hums forwards 40 cm for flat storage. Which also won’t happen, because the Q2 won’t have a separate bit in the body structure because it won’t sit on a multimaterial space frame.

    Thirdly, there is a removable targa roof panel. Nobody will buy a car with a removable targa panel because they’ll look a bit foolish when they’re driving down the road.

    Finally, the drive train. It’s a plug-in hybrid that uses a 1.5-litre three-cylinder TFSI petrol engine with two electric motors, promising potential fuel economy equivalent to 256.8 mpg with CO2 emissions of 26 grams per km, also helped by its diminutive 1,390 kg heft.

    Only thing is, the head of development at VAG told us that this isn’t the plug-in hybrid powertrain that Audi will be investing in. That one’s a diesel with a seven-speed DSG and an electric motor incorporated into the gearbox.

    Is there anything useful about it? Well, its 4.21 metre length, 1.88 metre width, 1.51 metre height and 2.56 meter wheelbase tells us roughly how big the Q2’s going to be. Otherwise? It’s a definite concept. 

  18. In terms of size and looks, this is pretty close to the rumoured Q2, Audi’s tiniest crossover. In terms of everything else, it categorically, resolutely is not.

    Firstly, there’s the body configuration - as well as a sliding seat the Crosslane has a carbon-heavy multi-material space frame, which also uses aluminium, and glass fibre-reinforced polymer. The astronomical cost of producing something like this means it’ll probably only appear on eco-specials or supercars, not a mainstream crossover.

    Secondly, there are seats. The boot makes up a separate bit in the body structure, which is attached to the backs of the rear chairs independently from the cushions. Press a button and the whole unit hums forwards 40 cm for flat storage. Which also won’t happen, because the Q2 won’t have a separate bit in the body structure because it won’t sit on a multimaterial space frame.

    Thirdly, there is a removable targa roof panel. Nobody will buy a car with a removable targa panel because they’ll look a bit foolish when they’re driving down the road.

    Finally, the drive train. It’s a plug-in hybrid that uses a 1.5-litre three-cylinder TFSI petrol engine with two electric motors, promising potential fuel economy equivalent to 256.8 mpg with CO2 emissions of 26 grams per km, also helped by its diminutive 1,390 kg heft.

    Only thing is, the head of development at VAG told us that this isn’t the plug-in hybrid powertrain that Audi will be investing in. That one’s a diesel with a seven-speed DSG and an electric motor incorporated into the gearbox.

    Is there anything useful about it? Well, its 4.21 metre length, 1.88 metre width, 1.51 metre height and 2.56 meter wheelbase tells us roughly how big the Q2’s going to be. Otherwise? It’s a definite concept. 

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