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The Aspark Owl will go from 0-62mph in two seconds

Japan’s newest supercar offering will offer a head-spinning 174mph from EV drivetrain

“You spot your prey 100 metres ahead,” Aspark confidently says. “The main dish for tonight’s dinner. You give chase at ferocious speed. Startled, your prey attempts to flee… but it’s already too late. Letting out a metallic roar, you take off.

“The contest is over almost as soon as it starts,” they conclude. Ladies and gentlemen, the actual human words of Japanese supercar-maker Aspark, describing the EV with which it plans to take over the world: the Owl.

Yes. Owl. That is a name. A name applied to – potentially – the world’s fastest accelerating EV supercar ever. Aspark confidently predicts its carbon-fibre two-seater will be able to deliver a haymaker to the world’s very fastest cars by accelerating from 0-62mph in just two seconds. TWO.

How does it plan on achieving this? A pair of 40kW motors. We’re told Aspark have developed a “completely new current control technology”, offering up 429bhp (320kW) and 563lb ft of torque. They’re small motors, for lightness, because lightness = speed.

There’s a battery and supercapacitor setup (the latter recovering energy from braking), to allow it lots of instant juice for, ahem, head-spinning forward movement. Power is sent to all four wheels (19in at the front, 20 on the back) and the whole shebang sits on a lightweight carbon fibre chassis. The lot weighs in at just 850kg.

If you’re struggling to size it up in your head, it’s roughly the same as a Lamborghini Aventador, but lower, believe it or not. It stands just 990mm tall. Therefore it has a low centre of gravity. We’re assured it should be pointy as well as being, um, accelerate-y. A hoot to drive, we hope.

Speaking of which, once you’re done “letting out a metallic roar”, you’ll be hitting a top speed of 174mph. Not too shabby. We suspect that this might adversely affect the claimed range of 93 miles.

We’ll let you wade in on the design, but we’ll give them a chance because it looks… good. Generic, maybe, but good. Inside, there is “ideal” leather, and four monitors on the instrument panel in place of mirrors. Nice.

No word on the Owl’s price. Nor an on-sale date. But speaking to TopGear.com at the car’s Frankfurt Motor Show reveal, Aspark reckons that one Owl - a fully working car - exists in Japan.

Please relay any and all relevant musings you may be experiencing on the Aspark Owl in the space below. A bona fide electric supercar, or a flight of fancy?

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