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The Lexus LC Convertible is a really good looking car

V8 up front, drive at the back, sky all around. Welcome Lexus’s prettiest drop-top

Well, that’s a tonic for the senses, isn’t it? This is the production version of a car we first saw at the start of the year. It is the Lexus LC500 Convertible, and it is quite lovely indeed. One might go as far as saying, it is really, really ridiculously good-looking.

We will talk about tech and chassis changes in a moment, because first, it is important to ascertain just how good looking the LC cabrio is. It takes the coupe’s clean, sharp surfacing to maintain a really clean silhouette. The stance is good. The proportions are spot on. And roof down, it looks fantastic.

Lexus isn’t being coy about the weight that’s been added to make sure it doesn’t wobble its pretty cheekbones into the gravel – indeed, the chassis gets “various structural braces” – but insists that despite this, it’ll still be fun to punt around in. Total weight stands at 2040kg, some 100kg heavier than the equivalent V8 LC500 coupe. Quite a bit.

The front suspension then, gets less unsprung weight, and the rear brace tower has been relocated and reshaped, and performance dampeners and a suspension brace made out of aluminium added to counter the additional bulk.

None of that, we suspect, matters. Because – once more for the back – it’s really lovely. Only available as a V8, too, in 5.0-litre 471bhp guise, matched up to a ten-speed auto ‘box. There’s 398lb ft of torque, too. Perfect for just cruising around without any notion of balancing the throttle on exit.

Indeed, no performance metrics have been announced (expect it to be slightly slower than the coupe’s 4.7secs to 62mph), other than the four-layer soft-top’s mechanism – it takes 15 seconds to open, and 16 to close, at speeds of up to 31mph. The boot’s been subtly redesigned (there’s a slight profile lift) to better mirror its coupe sibling. And naturally, the roof was designed to minimise noise and wrinkling.

It’s available in either black or beige, while a few new options on the body colour include ‘Flare Yellow’ and ‘Cadmium Orange’. Inside, you get upper body heaters and even warm or cold air sent to the back of your hands. And this bit we love. “While efforts are taken to keep certain sounds out, the powerful roar of the naturally aspirated V8 is a sound to savour.” Remove the puff, and that reads: it sound good.

It looks good, too. Agreed?

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