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Classic

The Lamborghini Miura goes back to... Miura

Lambo completes 50th anniversary of the legendary supercar by going to a farm

  • The Lamborghini Miura turned 50 last year, so at the end of 2016, Lamborghini deemed it prudent to take the old girl back to the farm. The Miura farm, that is.

    So that bright yellow, 385bhp V12-engined Miura SV you see above - normally resident of the Lamborghini Museum in Sant'Agata - made the arduous 600km trek from Madrid to a small bull breeding farm in Lora del Rio, Andalusia. 

    The farm is run by the Miura family; it was in 1966 that Don Eduardo famously met with Ferrucio, who would later take the farm's name and apply it to the first ever Lambo supercar. Because bulls, and speed, and power, and so on, and so on...

    Today, the farm - itself founded 175 years ago - is run by Don Eduardo's sons, Antonio and, um, Eduardo, who were treated to the sight not only of the SV's homecoming, but also of six more rather lavishly coloured Huracáns and Aventadors. A bit of support for their elderly sibling, no doubt.

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  • The Lamborghini Miura turned 50 last year, so at the end of 2016, Lamborghini deemed it prudent to take the old girl back to the farm. The Miura farm, that is.

    So that bright yellow, 385bhp V12-engined Miura SV you see above - normally resident of the Lamborghini Museum in Sant'Agata - made the arduous 600km trek from Madrid to a small bull breeding farm in Lora del Rio, Andalusia. 

    The farm is run by the Miura family; it was in 1966 that Don Eduardo famously met with Ferrucio, who would later take the farm's name and apply it to the first ever Lambo supercar. Because bulls, and speed, and power, and so on, and so on...

    Today, the farm - itself founded 175 years ago - is run by Don Eduardo's sons, Antonio and, um, Eduardo, who were treated to the sight not only of the SV's homecoming, but also of six more rather lavishly coloured Huracáns and Aventadors. A bit of support for their elderly sibling, no doubt.

  • The Lamborghini Miura turned 50 last year, so at the end of 2016, Lamborghini deemed it prudent to take the old girl back to the farm. The Miura farm, that is.

    So that bright yellow, 385bhp V12-engined Miura SV you see above - normally resident of the Lamborghini Museum in Sant'Agata - made the arduous 600km trek from Madrid to a small bull breeding farm in Lora del Rio, Andalusia. 

    The farm is run by the Miura family; it was in 1966 that Don Eduardo famously met with Ferrucio, who would later take the farm's name and apply it to the first ever Lambo supercar. Because bulls, and speed, and power, and so on, and so on...

    Today, the farm - itself founded 175 years ago - is run by Don Eduardo's sons, Antonio and, um, Eduardo, who were treated to the sight not only of the SV's homecoming, but also of six more rather lavishly coloured Huracáns and Aventadors. A bit of support for their elderly sibling, no doubt.

    Advertisement - Page continues below
  • The Lamborghini Miura turned 50 last year, so at the end of 2016, Lamborghini deemed it prudent to take the old girl back to the farm. The Miura farm, that is.

    So that bright yellow, 385bhp V12-engined Miura SV you see above - normally resident of the Lamborghini Museum in Sant'Agata - made the arduous 600km trek from Madrid to a small bull breeding farm in Lora del Rio, Andalusia. 

    The farm is run by the Miura family; it was in 1966 that Don Eduardo famously met with Ferrucio, who would later take the farm's name and apply it to the first ever Lambo supercar. Because bulls, and speed, and power, and so on, and so on...

    Today, the farm - itself founded 175 years ago - is run by Don Eduardo's sons, Antonio and, um, Eduardo, who were treated to the sight not only of the SV's homecoming, but also of six more rather lavishly coloured Huracáns and Aventadors. A bit of support for their elderly sibling, no doubt.

  • The Lamborghini Miura turned 50 last year, so at the end of 2016, Lamborghini deemed it prudent to take the old girl back to the farm. The Miura farm, that is.

    So that bright yellow, 385bhp V12-engined Miura SV you see above - normally resident of the Lamborghini Museum in Sant'Agata - made the arduous 600km trek from Madrid to a small bull breeding farm in Lora del Rio, Andalusia. 

    The farm is run by the Miura family; it was in 1966 that Don Eduardo famously met with Ferrucio, who would later take the farm's name and apply it to the first ever Lambo supercar. Because bulls, and speed, and power, and so on, and so on...

    Today, the farm - itself founded 175 years ago - is run by Don Eduardo's sons, Antonio and, um, Eduardo, who were treated to the sight not only of the SV's homecoming, but also of six more rather lavishly coloured Huracáns and Aventadors. A bit of support for their elderly sibling, no doubt.

  • The Lamborghini Miura turned 50 last year, so at the end of 2016, Lamborghini deemed it prudent to take the old girl back to the farm. The Miura farm, that is.

    So that bright yellow, 385bhp V12-engined Miura SV you see above - normally resident of the Lamborghini Museum in Sant'Agata - made the arduous 600km trek from Madrid to a small bull breeding farm in Lora del Rio, Andalusia. 

    The farm is run by the Miura family; it was in 1966 that Don Eduardo famously met with Ferrucio, who would later take the farm's name and apply it to the first ever Lambo supercar. Because bulls, and speed, and power, and so on, and so on...

    Today, the farm - itself founded 175 years ago - is run by Don Eduardo's sons, Antonio and, um, Eduardo, who were treated to the sight not only of the SV's homecoming, but also of six more rather lavishly coloured Huracáns and Aventadors. A bit of support for their elderly sibling, no doubt.

  • The Lamborghini Miura turned 50 last year, so at the end of 2016, Lamborghini deemed it prudent to take the old girl back to the farm. The Miura farm, that is.

    So that bright yellow, 385bhp V12-engined Miura SV you see above - normally resident of the Lamborghini Museum in Sant'Agata - made the arduous 600km trek from Madrid to a small bull breeding farm in Lora del Rio, Andalusia. 

    The farm is run by the Miura family; it was in 1966 that Don Eduardo famously met with Ferrucio, who would later take the farm's name and apply it to the first ever Lambo supercar. Because bulls, and speed, and power, and so on, and so on...

    Today, the farm - itself founded 175 years ago - is run by Don Eduardo's sons, Antonio and, um, Eduardo, who were treated to the sight not only of the SV's homecoming, but also of six more rather lavishly coloured Huracáns and Aventadors. A bit of support for their elderly sibling, no doubt.

    Advertisement - Page continues below
  • The Lamborghini Miura turned 50 last year, so at the end of 2016, Lamborghini deemed it prudent to take the old girl back to the farm. The Miura farm, that is.

    So that bright yellow, 385bhp V12-engined Miura SV you see above - normally resident of the Lamborghini Museum in Sant'Agata - made the arduous 600km trek from Madrid to a small bull breeding farm in Lora del Rio, Andalusia. 

    The farm is run by the Miura family; it was in 1966 that Don Eduardo famously met with Ferrucio, who would later take the farm's name and apply it to the first ever Lambo supercar. Because bulls, and speed, and power, and so on, and so on...

    Today, the farm - itself founded 175 years ago - is run by Don Eduardo's sons, Antonio and, um, Eduardo, who were treated to the sight not only of the SV's homecoming, but also of six more rather lavishly coloured Huracáns and Aventadors. A bit of support for their elderly sibling, no doubt.

  • The Lamborghini Miura turned 50 last year, so at the end of 2016, Lamborghini deemed it prudent to take the old girl back to the farm. The Miura farm, that is.

    So that bright yellow, 385bhp V12-engined Miura SV you see above - normally resident of the Lamborghini Museum in Sant'Agata - made the arduous 600km trek from Madrid to a small bull breeding farm in Lora del Rio, Andalusia. 

    The farm is run by the Miura family; it was in 1966 that Don Eduardo famously met with Ferrucio, who would later take the farm's name and apply it to the first ever Lambo supercar. Because bulls, and speed, and power, and so on, and so on...

    Today, the farm - itself founded 175 years ago - is run by Don Eduardo's sons, Antonio and, um, Eduardo, who were treated to the sight not only of the SV's homecoming, but also of six more rather lavishly coloured Huracáns and Aventadors. A bit of support for their elderly sibling, no doubt.

    Advertisement - Page continues below
  • The Lamborghini Miura turned 50 last year, so at the end of 2016, Lamborghini deemed it prudent to take the old girl back to the farm. The Miura farm, that is.

    So that bright yellow, 385bhp V12-engined Miura SV you see above - normally resident of the Lamborghini Museum in Sant'Agata - made the arduous 600km trek from Madrid to a small bull breeding farm in Lora del Rio, Andalusia. 

    The farm is run by the Miura family; it was in 1966 that Don Eduardo famously met with Ferrucio, who would later take the farm's name and apply it to the first ever Lambo supercar. Because bulls, and speed, and power, and so on, and so on...

    Today, the farm - itself founded 175 years ago - is run by Don Eduardo's sons, Antonio and, um, Eduardo, who were treated to the sight not only of the SV's homecoming, but also of six more rather lavishly coloured Huracáns and Aventadors. A bit of support for their elderly sibling, no doubt.

  • The Lamborghini Miura turned 50 last year, so at the end of 2016, Lamborghini deemed it prudent to take the old girl back to the farm. The Miura farm, that is.

    So that bright yellow, 385bhp V12-engined Miura SV you see above - normally resident of the Lamborghini Museum in Sant'Agata - made the arduous 600km trek from Madrid to a small bull breeding farm in Lora del Rio, Andalusia. 

    The farm is run by the Miura family; it was in 1966 that Don Eduardo famously met with Ferrucio, who would later take the farm's name and apply it to the first ever Lambo supercar. Because bulls, and speed, and power, and so on, and so on...

    Today, the farm - itself founded 175 years ago - is run by Don Eduardo's sons, Antonio and, um, Eduardo, who were treated to the sight not only of the SV's homecoming, but also of six more rather lavishly coloured Huracáns and Aventadors. A bit of support for their elderly sibling, no doubt.

  • The Lamborghini Miura turned 50 last year, so at the end of 2016, Lamborghini deemed it prudent to take the old girl back to the farm. The Miura farm, that is.

    So that bright yellow, 385bhp V12-engined Miura SV you see above - normally resident of the Lamborghini Museum in Sant'Agata - made the arduous 600km trek from Madrid to a small bull breeding farm in Lora del Rio, Andalusia. 

    The farm is run by the Miura family; it was in 1966 that Don Eduardo famously met with Ferrucio, who would later take the farm's name and apply it to the first ever Lambo supercar. Because bulls, and speed, and power, and so on, and so on...

    Today, the farm - itself founded 175 years ago - is run by Don Eduardo's sons, Antonio and, um, Eduardo, who were treated to the sight not only of the SV's homecoming, but also of six more rather lavishly coloured Huracáns and Aventadors. A bit of support for their elderly sibling, no doubt.

  • The Lamborghini Miura turned 50 last year, so at the end of 2016, Lamborghini deemed it prudent to take the old girl back to the farm. The Miura farm, that is.

    So that bright yellow, 385bhp V12-engined Miura SV you see above - normally resident of the Lamborghini Museum in Sant'Agata - made the arduous 600km trek from Madrid to a small bull breeding farm in Lora del Rio, Andalusia. 

    The farm is run by the Miura family; it was in 1966 that Don Eduardo famously met with Ferrucio, who would later take the farm's name and apply it to the first ever Lambo supercar. Because bulls, and speed, and power, and so on, and so on...

    Today, the farm - itself founded 175 years ago - is run by Don Eduardo's sons, Antonio and, um, Eduardo, who were treated to the sight not only of the SV's homecoming, but also of six more rather lavishly coloured Huracáns and Aventadors. A bit of support for their elderly sibling, no doubt.

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