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Gallery: many Paganis invading Japan

Gawp at every kind of Pagani – including the Zonda R – on this epic road trip

  • Cars don’t get much more visually stimulating than what Pagani pumps out. From the first Zonda – through the crazy Revolucion and one-offs – to the latest and greatest Huayra (the BC), your eyes have a seemingly never-ending feast of intricate details and engineering to drink up. And as parts of the world go, Japan, with its contrasting neon cityscape and stunning countryside, is a pretty visually stimulating place to boot. 
     
    So what happens when you mix the two? Lots of good, that’s what. It’s exactly what happened recently when Pagani took its annual driving pilgrimage to Asia for the first time. 
     
    A few years ago, Top Gear joined Pagani on its annual summertime supercar jaunt around Europe. But for this year, an insurer’s nightmare worth of Horacio’s carbon creations got on planes and made the trip to Japan to give its Asian customer base – of which there are many – a localised option. 
     
    Over the last few years Pagani – and its tour – has grown. With the help of his sons, Christopher and Leonardo, Horacio has expanded his factory to five times the original size, established serious outposts in Asia, and cracked America. It’s all thanks to the stunning Huayra, which has helped make his little Italian company a big player in the hypercar game.
     
    For this year’s tour, the plan was to do a loop from downtown Tokyo to Fuji Speedway and then back again. It took in some of the legendary roads and car venues including Daikoku PA, the Hakone Turnpike (the legendary eight and a half mile strip of private tarmac that meanders its way up the mountainside of the Kanagawa Prefecture) as well as a track day at Fuji Speedway. 
     
    But as usual, it was the cars that stole the show. Alongside the normal gaggle of Zondas and Huayras were two track animals. Yep, for the first time, Pagani’s mad track versions were let off the leash and came out to play. One being a delicious clear carbon Zonda R, the other a clear blue carbon Zonda Revolucion, both hitting the track at Fuji with its new 789bhp younger brother, the special edition Huayra BC. 
     
    Just think of the noise. The speed. And general awesome. Jealous much? Because we sure as hell are. 

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  • Cars don’t get much more visually stimulating than what Pagani pumps out. From the first Zonda – through the crazy Revolucion and one-offs – to the latest and greatest Huayra (the BC), your eyes have a seemingly never-ending feast of intricate details and engineering to drink up. And as parts of the world go, Japan, with its contrasting neon cityscape and stunning countryside, is a pretty visually stimulating place to boot. 
     
    So what happens when you mix the two? Lots of good, that’s what. It’s exactly what happened recently when Pagani took its annual driving pilgrimage to Asia for the first time. 
     
    A few years ago, Top Gear joined Pagani on its annual summertime supercar jaunt around Europe. But for this year, an insurer’s nightmare worth of Horacio’s carbon creations got on planes and made the trip to Japan to give its Asian customer base – of which there are many – a localised option. 
     
    Over the last few years Pagani – and its tour – has grown. With the help of his sons, Christopher and Leonardo, Horacio has expanded his factory to five times the original size, established serious outposts in Asia, and cracked America. It’s all thanks to the stunning Huayra, which has helped make his little Italian company a big player in the hypercar game.
     
    For this year’s tour, the plan was to do a loop from downtown Tokyo to Fuji Speedway and then back again. It took in some of the legendary roads and car venues including Daikoku PA, the Hakone Turnpike (the legendary eight and a half mile strip of private tarmac that meanders its way up the mountainside of the Kanagawa Prefecture) as well as a track day at Fuji Speedway. 
     
    But as usual, it was the cars that stole the show. Alongside the normal gaggle of Zondas and Huayras were two track animals. Yep, for the first time, Pagani’s mad track versions were let off the leash and came out to play. One being a delicious clear carbon Zonda R, the other a clear blue carbon Zonda Revolucion, both hitting the track at Fuji with its new 789bhp younger brother, the special edition Huayra BC. 
     
    Just think of the noise. The speed. And general awesome. Jealous much? Because we sure as hell are. 

  • Cars don’t get much more visually stimulating than what Pagani pumps out. From the first Zonda – through the crazy Revolucion and one-offs – to the latest and greatest Huayra (the BC), your eyes have a seemingly never-ending feast of intricate details and engineering to drink up. And as parts of the world go, Japan, with its contrasting neon cityscape and stunning countryside, is a pretty visually stimulating place to boot. 
     
    So what happens when you mix the two? Lots of good, that’s what. It’s exactly what happened recently when Pagani took its annual driving pilgrimage to Asia for the first time. 
     
    A few years ago, Top Gear joined Pagani on its annual summertime supercar jaunt around Europe. But for this year, an insurer’s nightmare worth of Horacio’s carbon creations got on planes and made the trip to Japan to give its Asian customer base – of which there are many – a localised option. 
     
    Over the last few years Pagani – and its tour – has grown. With the help of his sons, Christopher and Leonardo, Horacio has expanded his factory to five times the original size, established serious outposts in Asia, and cracked America. It’s all thanks to the stunning Huayra, which has helped make his little Italian company a big player in the hypercar game.
     
    For this year’s tour, the plan was to do a loop from downtown Tokyo to Fuji Speedway and then back again. It took in some of the legendary roads and car venues including Daikoku PA, the Hakone Turnpike (the legendary eight and a half mile strip of private tarmac that meanders its way up the mountainside of the Kanagawa Prefecture) as well as a track day at Fuji Speedway. 
     
    But as usual, it was the cars that stole the show. Alongside the normal gaggle of Zondas and Huayras were two track animals. Yep, for the first time, Pagani’s mad track versions were let off the leash and came out to play. One being a delicious clear carbon Zonda R, the other a clear blue carbon Zonda Revolucion, both hitting the track at Fuji with its new 789bhp younger brother, the special edition Huayra BC. 
     
    Just think of the noise. The speed. And general awesome. Jealous much? Because we sure as hell are. 

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  • Cars don’t get much more visually stimulating than what Pagani pumps out. From the first Zonda – through the crazy Revolucion and one-offs – to the latest and greatest Huayra (the BC), your eyes have a seemingly never-ending feast of intricate details and engineering to drink up. And as parts of the world go, Japan, with its contrasting neon cityscape and stunning countryside, is a pretty visually stimulating place to boot. 
     
    So what happens when you mix the two? Lots of good, that’s what. It’s exactly what happened recently when Pagani took its annual driving pilgrimage to Asia for the first time. 
     
    A few years ago, Top Gear joined Pagani on its annual summertime supercar jaunt around Europe. But for this year, an insurer’s nightmare worth of Horacio’s carbon creations got on planes and made the trip to Japan to give its Asian customer base – of which there are many – a localised option. 
     
    Over the last few years Pagani – and its tour – has grown. With the help of his sons, Christopher and Leonardo, Horacio has expanded his factory to five times the original size, established serious outposts in Asia, and cracked America. It’s all thanks to the stunning Huayra, which has helped make his little Italian company a big player in the hypercar game.
     
    For this year’s tour, the plan was to do a loop from downtown Tokyo to Fuji Speedway and then back again. It took in some of the legendary roads and car venues including Daikoku PA, the Hakone Turnpike (the legendary eight and a half mile strip of private tarmac that meanders its way up the mountainside of the Kanagawa Prefecture) as well as a track day at Fuji Speedway. 
     
    But as usual, it was the cars that stole the show. Alongside the normal gaggle of Zondas and Huayras were two track animals. Yep, for the first time, Pagani’s mad track versions were let off the leash and came out to play. One being a delicious clear carbon Zonda R, the other a clear blue carbon Zonda Revolucion, both hitting the track at Fuji with its new 789bhp younger brother, the special edition Huayra BC. 
     
    Just think of the noise. The speed. And general awesome. Jealous much? Because we sure as hell are. 

  • Cars don’t get much more visually stimulating than what Pagani pumps out. From the first Zonda – through the crazy Revolucion and one-offs – to the latest and greatest Huayra (the BC), your eyes have a seemingly never-ending feast of intricate details and engineering to drink up. And as parts of the world go, Japan, with its contrasting neon cityscape and stunning countryside, is a pretty visually stimulating place to boot. 
     
    So what happens when you mix the two? Lots of good, that’s what. It’s exactly what happened recently when Pagani took its annual driving pilgrimage to Asia for the first time. 
     
    A few years ago, Top Gear joined Pagani on its annual summertime supercar jaunt around Europe. But for this year, an insurer’s nightmare worth of Horacio’s carbon creations got on planes and made the trip to Japan to give its Asian customer base – of which there are many – a localised option. 
     
    Over the last few years Pagani – and its tour – has grown. With the help of his sons, Christopher and Leonardo, Horacio has expanded his factory to five times the original size, established serious outposts in Asia, and cracked America. It’s all thanks to the stunning Huayra, which has helped make his little Italian company a big player in the hypercar game.
     
    For this year’s tour, the plan was to do a loop from downtown Tokyo to Fuji Speedway and then back again. It took in some of the legendary roads and car venues including Daikoku PA, the Hakone Turnpike (the legendary eight and a half mile strip of private tarmac that meanders its way up the mountainside of the Kanagawa Prefecture) as well as a track day at Fuji Speedway. 
     
    But as usual, it was the cars that stole the show. Alongside the normal gaggle of Zondas and Huayras were two track animals. Yep, for the first time, Pagani’s mad track versions were let off the leash and came out to play. One being a delicious clear carbon Zonda R, the other a clear blue carbon Zonda Revolucion, both hitting the track at Fuji with its new 789bhp younger brother, the special edition Huayra BC. 
     
    Just think of the noise. The speed. And general awesome. Jealous much? Because we sure as hell are. 

  • Cars don’t get much more visually stimulating than what Pagani pumps out. From the first Zonda – through the crazy Revolucion and one-offs – to the latest and greatest Huayra (the BC), your eyes have a seemingly never-ending feast of intricate details and engineering to drink up. And as parts of the world go, Japan, with its contrasting neon cityscape and stunning countryside, is a pretty visually stimulating place to boot. 
     
    So what happens when you mix the two? Lots of good, that’s what. It’s exactly what happened recently when Pagani took its annual driving pilgrimage to Asia for the first time. 
     
    A few years ago, Top Gear joined Pagani on its annual summertime supercar jaunt around Europe. But for this year, an insurer’s nightmare worth of Horacio’s carbon creations got on planes and made the trip to Japan to give its Asian customer base – of which there are many – a localised option. 
     
    Over the last few years Pagani – and its tour – has grown. With the help of his sons, Christopher and Leonardo, Horacio has expanded his factory to five times the original size, established serious outposts in Asia, and cracked America. It’s all thanks to the stunning Huayra, which has helped make his little Italian company a big player in the hypercar game.
     
    For this year’s tour, the plan was to do a loop from downtown Tokyo to Fuji Speedway and then back again. It took in some of the legendary roads and car venues including Daikoku PA, the Hakone Turnpike (the legendary eight and a half mile strip of private tarmac that meanders its way up the mountainside of the Kanagawa Prefecture) as well as a track day at Fuji Speedway. 
     
    But as usual, it was the cars that stole the show. Alongside the normal gaggle of Zondas and Huayras were two track animals. Yep, for the first time, Pagani’s mad track versions were let off the leash and came out to play. One being a delicious clear carbon Zonda R, the other a clear blue carbon Zonda Revolucion, both hitting the track at Fuji with its new 789bhp younger brother, the special edition Huayra BC. 
     
    Just think of the noise. The speed. And general awesome. Jealous much? Because we sure as hell are. 

  • Cars don’t get much more visually stimulating than what Pagani pumps out. From the first Zonda – through the crazy Revolucion and one-offs – to the latest and greatest Huayra (the BC), your eyes have a seemingly never-ending feast of intricate details and engineering to drink up. And as parts of the world go, Japan, with its contrasting neon cityscape and stunning countryside, is a pretty visually stimulating place to boot. 
     
    So what happens when you mix the two? Lots of good, that’s what. It’s exactly what happened recently when Pagani took its annual driving pilgrimage to Asia for the first time. 
     
    A few years ago, Top Gear joined Pagani on its annual summertime supercar jaunt around Europe. But for this year, an insurer’s nightmare worth of Horacio’s carbon creations got on planes and made the trip to Japan to give its Asian customer base – of which there are many – a localised option. 
     
    Over the last few years Pagani – and its tour – has grown. With the help of his sons, Christopher and Leonardo, Horacio has expanded his factory to five times the original size, established serious outposts in Asia, and cracked America. It’s all thanks to the stunning Huayra, which has helped make his little Italian company a big player in the hypercar game.
     
    For this year’s tour, the plan was to do a loop from downtown Tokyo to Fuji Speedway and then back again. It took in some of the legendary roads and car venues including Daikoku PA, the Hakone Turnpike (the legendary eight and a half mile strip of private tarmac that meanders its way up the mountainside of the Kanagawa Prefecture) as well as a track day at Fuji Speedway. 
     
    But as usual, it was the cars that stole the show. Alongside the normal gaggle of Zondas and Huayras were two track animals. Yep, for the first time, Pagani’s mad track versions were let off the leash and came out to play. One being a delicious clear carbon Zonda R, the other a clear blue carbon Zonda Revolucion, both hitting the track at Fuji with its new 789bhp younger brother, the special edition Huayra BC. 
     
    Just think of the noise. The speed. And general awesome. Jealous much? Because we sure as hell are. 

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  • Cars don’t get much more visually stimulating than what Pagani pumps out. From the first Zonda – through the crazy Revolucion and one-offs – to the latest and greatest Huayra (the BC), your eyes have a seemingly never-ending feast of intricate details and engineering to drink up. And as parts of the world go, Japan, with its contrasting neon cityscape and stunning countryside, is a pretty visually stimulating place to boot. 
     
    So what happens when you mix the two? Lots of good, that’s what. It’s exactly what happened recently when Pagani took its annual driving pilgrimage to Asia for the first time. 
     
    A few years ago, Top Gear joined Pagani on its annual summertime supercar jaunt around Europe. But for this year, an insurer’s nightmare worth of Horacio’s carbon creations got on planes and made the trip to Japan to give its Asian customer base – of which there are many – a localised option. 
     
    Over the last few years Pagani – and its tour – has grown. With the help of his sons, Christopher and Leonardo, Horacio has expanded his factory to five times the original size, established serious outposts in Asia, and cracked America. It’s all thanks to the stunning Huayra, which has helped make his little Italian company a big player in the hypercar game.
     
    For this year’s tour, the plan was to do a loop from downtown Tokyo to Fuji Speedway and then back again. It took in some of the legendary roads and car venues including Daikoku PA, the Hakone Turnpike (the legendary eight and a half mile strip of private tarmac that meanders its way up the mountainside of the Kanagawa Prefecture) as well as a track day at Fuji Speedway. 
     
    But as usual, it was the cars that stole the show. Alongside the normal gaggle of Zondas and Huayras were two track animals. Yep, for the first time, Pagani’s mad track versions were let off the leash and came out to play. One being a delicious clear carbon Zonda R, the other a clear blue carbon Zonda Revolucion, both hitting the track at Fuji with its new 789bhp younger brother, the special edition Huayra BC. 
     
    Just think of the noise. The speed. And general awesome. Jealous much? Because we sure as hell are. 

  • Cars don’t get much more visually stimulating than what Pagani pumps out. From the first Zonda – through the crazy Revolucion and one-offs – to the latest and greatest Huayra (the BC), your eyes have a seemingly never-ending feast of intricate details and engineering to drink up. And as parts of the world go, Japan, with its contrasting neon cityscape and stunning countryside, is a pretty visually stimulating place to boot. 
     
    So what happens when you mix the two? Lots of good, that’s what. It’s exactly what happened recently when Pagani took its annual driving pilgrimage to Asia for the first time. 
     
    A few years ago, Top Gear joined Pagani on its annual summertime supercar jaunt around Europe. But for this year, an insurer’s nightmare worth of Horacio’s carbon creations got on planes and made the trip to Japan to give its Asian customer base – of which there are many – a localised option. 
     
    Over the last few years Pagani – and its tour – has grown. With the help of his sons, Christopher and Leonardo, Horacio has expanded his factory to five times the original size, established serious outposts in Asia, and cracked America. It’s all thanks to the stunning Huayra, which has helped make his little Italian company a big player in the hypercar game.
     
    For this year’s tour, the plan was to do a loop from downtown Tokyo to Fuji Speedway and then back again. It took in some of the legendary roads and car venues including Daikoku PA, the Hakone Turnpike (the legendary eight and a half mile strip of private tarmac that meanders its way up the mountainside of the Kanagawa Prefecture) as well as a track day at Fuji Speedway. 
     
    But as usual, it was the cars that stole the show. Alongside the normal gaggle of Zondas and Huayras were two track animals. Yep, for the first time, Pagani’s mad track versions were let off the leash and came out to play. One being a delicious clear carbon Zonda R, the other a clear blue carbon Zonda Revolucion, both hitting the track at Fuji with its new 789bhp younger brother, the special edition Huayra BC. 
     
    Just think of the noise. The speed. And general awesome. Jealous much? Because we sure as hell are. 

    Advertisement - Page continues below
  • Cars don’t get much more visually stimulating than what Pagani pumps out. From the first Zonda – through the crazy Revolucion and one-offs – to the latest and greatest Huayra (the BC), your eyes have a seemingly never-ending feast of intricate details and engineering to drink up. And as parts of the world go, Japan, with its contrasting neon cityscape and stunning countryside, is a pretty visually stimulating place to boot. 
     
    So what happens when you mix the two? Lots of good, that’s what. It’s exactly what happened recently when Pagani took its annual driving pilgrimage to Asia for the first time. 
     
    A few years ago, Top Gear joined Pagani on its annual summertime supercar jaunt around Europe. But for this year, an insurer’s nightmare worth of Horacio’s carbon creations got on planes and made the trip to Japan to give its Asian customer base – of which there are many – a localised option. 
     
    Over the last few years Pagani – and its tour – has grown. With the help of his sons, Christopher and Leonardo, Horacio has expanded his factory to five times the original size, established serious outposts in Asia, and cracked America. It’s all thanks to the stunning Huayra, which has helped make his little Italian company a big player in the hypercar game.
     
    For this year’s tour, the plan was to do a loop from downtown Tokyo to Fuji Speedway and then back again. It took in some of the legendary roads and car venues including Daikoku PA, the Hakone Turnpike (the legendary eight and a half mile strip of private tarmac that meanders its way up the mountainside of the Kanagawa Prefecture) as well as a track day at Fuji Speedway. 
     
    But as usual, it was the cars that stole the show. Alongside the normal gaggle of Zondas and Huayras were two track animals. Yep, for the first time, Pagani’s mad track versions were let off the leash and came out to play. One being a delicious clear carbon Zonda R, the other a clear blue carbon Zonda Revolucion, both hitting the track at Fuji with its new 789bhp younger brother, the special edition Huayra BC. 
     
    Just think of the noise. The speed. And general awesome. Jealous much? Because we sure as hell are. 

  • Cars don’t get much more visually stimulating than what Pagani pumps out. From the first Zonda – through the crazy Revolucion and one-offs – to the latest and greatest Huayra (the BC), your eyes have a seemingly never-ending feast of intricate details and engineering to drink up. And as parts of the world go, Japan, with its contrasting neon cityscape and stunning countryside, is a pretty visually stimulating place to boot. 
     
    So what happens when you mix the two? Lots of good, that’s what. It’s exactly what happened recently when Pagani took its annual driving pilgrimage to Asia for the first time. 
     
    A few years ago, Top Gear joined Pagani on its annual summertime supercar jaunt around Europe. But for this year, an insurer’s nightmare worth of Horacio’s carbon creations got on planes and made the trip to Japan to give its Asian customer base – of which there are many – a localised option. 
     
    Over the last few years Pagani – and its tour – has grown. With the help of his sons, Christopher and Leonardo, Horacio has expanded his factory to five times the original size, established serious outposts in Asia, and cracked America. It’s all thanks to the stunning Huayra, which has helped make his little Italian company a big player in the hypercar game.
     
    For this year’s tour, the plan was to do a loop from downtown Tokyo to Fuji Speedway and then back again. It took in some of the legendary roads and car venues including Daikoku PA, the Hakone Turnpike (the legendary eight and a half mile strip of private tarmac that meanders its way up the mountainside of the Kanagawa Prefecture) as well as a track day at Fuji Speedway. 
     
    But as usual, it was the cars that stole the show. Alongside the normal gaggle of Zondas and Huayras were two track animals. Yep, for the first time, Pagani’s mad track versions were let off the leash and came out to play. One being a delicious clear carbon Zonda R, the other a clear blue carbon Zonda Revolucion, both hitting the track at Fuji with its new 789bhp younger brother, the special edition Huayra BC. 
     
    Just think of the noise. The speed. And general awesome. Jealous much? Because we sure as hell are. 

  • Cars don’t get much more visually stimulating than what Pagani pumps out. From the first Zonda – through the crazy Revolucion and one-offs – to the latest and greatest Huayra (the BC), your eyes have a seemingly never-ending feast of intricate details and engineering to drink up. And as parts of the world go, Japan, with its contrasting neon cityscape and stunning countryside, is a pretty visually stimulating place to boot. 
     
    So what happens when you mix the two? Lots of good, that’s what. It’s exactly what happened recently when Pagani took its annual driving pilgrimage to Asia for the first time. 
     
    A few years ago, Top Gear joined Pagani on its annual summertime supercar jaunt around Europe. But for this year, an insurer’s nightmare worth of Horacio’s carbon creations got on planes and made the trip to Japan to give its Asian customer base – of which there are many – a localised option. 
     
    Over the last few years Pagani – and its tour – has grown. With the help of his sons, Christopher and Leonardo, Horacio has expanded his factory to five times the original size, established serious outposts in Asia, and cracked America. It’s all thanks to the stunning Huayra, which has helped make his little Italian company a big player in the hypercar game.
     
    For this year’s tour, the plan was to do a loop from downtown Tokyo to Fuji Speedway and then back again. It took in some of the legendary roads and car venues including Daikoku PA, the Hakone Turnpike (the legendary eight and a half mile strip of private tarmac that meanders its way up the mountainside of the Kanagawa Prefecture) as well as a track day at Fuji Speedway. 
     
    But as usual, it was the cars that stole the show. Alongside the normal gaggle of Zondas and Huayras were two track animals. Yep, for the first time, Pagani’s mad track versions were let off the leash and came out to play. One being a delicious clear carbon Zonda R, the other a clear blue carbon Zonda Revolucion, both hitting the track at Fuji with its new 789bhp younger brother, the special edition Huayra BC. 
     
    Just think of the noise. The speed. And general awesome. Jealous much? Because we sure as hell are. 

  • Cars don’t get much more visually stimulating than what Pagani pumps out. From the first Zonda – through the crazy Revolucion and one-offs – to the latest and greatest Huayra (the BC), your eyes have a seemingly never-ending feast of intricate details and engineering to drink up. And as parts of the world go, Japan, with its contrasting neon cityscape and stunning countryside, is a pretty visually stimulating place to boot. 
     
    So what happens when you mix the two? Lots of good, that’s what. It’s exactly what happened recently when Pagani took its annual driving pilgrimage to Asia for the first time. 
     
    A few years ago, Top Gear joined Pagani on its annual summertime supercar jaunt around Europe. But for this year, an insurer’s nightmare worth of Horacio’s carbon creations got on planes and made the trip to Japan to give its Asian customer base – of which there are many – a localised option. 
     
    Over the last few years Pagani – and its tour – has grown. With the help of his sons, Christopher and Leonardo, Horacio has expanded his factory to five times the original size, established serious outposts in Asia, and cracked America. It’s all thanks to the stunning Huayra, which has helped make his little Italian company a big player in the hypercar game.
     
    For this year’s tour, the plan was to do a loop from downtown Tokyo to Fuji Speedway and then back again. It took in some of the legendary roads and car venues including Daikoku PA, the Hakone Turnpike (the legendary eight and a half mile strip of private tarmac that meanders its way up the mountainside of the Kanagawa Prefecture) as well as a track day at Fuji Speedway. 
     
    But as usual, it was the cars that stole the show. Alongside the normal gaggle of Zondas and Huayras were two track animals. Yep, for the first time, Pagani’s mad track versions were let off the leash and came out to play. One being a delicious clear carbon Zonda R, the other a clear blue carbon Zonda Revolucion, both hitting the track at Fuji with its new 789bhp younger brother, the special edition Huayra BC. 
     
    Just think of the noise. The speed. And general awesome. Jealous much? Because we sure as hell are. 

  • Cars don’t get much more visually stimulating than what Pagani pumps out. From the first Zonda – through the crazy Revolucion and one-offs – to the latest and greatest Huayra (the BC), your eyes have a seemingly never-ending feast of intricate details and engineering to drink up. And as parts of the world go, Japan, with its contrasting neon cityscape and stunning countryside, is a pretty visually stimulating place to boot. 
     
    So what happens when you mix the two? Lots of good, that’s what. It’s exactly what happened recently when Pagani took its annual driving pilgrimage to Asia for the first time. 
     
    A few years ago, Top Gear joined Pagani on its annual summertime supercar jaunt around Europe. But for this year, an insurer’s nightmare worth of Horacio’s carbon creations got on planes and made the trip to Japan to give its Asian customer base – of which there are many – a localised option. 
     
    Over the last few years Pagani – and its tour – has grown. With the help of his sons, Christopher and Leonardo, Horacio has expanded his factory to five times the original size, established serious outposts in Asia, and cracked America. It’s all thanks to the stunning Huayra, which has helped make his little Italian company a big player in the hypercar game.
     
    For this year’s tour, the plan was to do a loop from downtown Tokyo to Fuji Speedway and then back again. It took in some of the legendary roads and car venues including Daikoku PA, the Hakone Turnpike (the legendary eight and a half mile strip of private tarmac that meanders its way up the mountainside of the Kanagawa Prefecture) as well as a track day at Fuji Speedway. 
     
    But as usual, it was the cars that stole the show. Alongside the normal gaggle of Zondas and Huayras were two track animals. Yep, for the first time, Pagani’s mad track versions were let off the leash and came out to play. One being a delicious clear carbon Zonda R, the other a clear blue carbon Zonda Revolucion, both hitting the track at Fuji with its new 789bhp younger brother, the special edition Huayra BC. 
     
    Just think of the noise. The speed. And general awesome. Jealous much? Because we sure as hell are. 

  • Cars don’t get much more visually stimulating than what Pagani pumps out. From the first Zonda – through the crazy Revolucion and one-offs – to the latest and greatest Huayra (the BC), your eyes have a seemingly never-ending feast of intricate details and engineering to drink up. And as parts of the world go, Japan, with its contrasting neon cityscape and stunning countryside, is a pretty visually stimulating place to boot. 
     
    So what happens when you mix the two? Lots of good, that’s what. It’s exactly what happened recently when Pagani took its annual driving pilgrimage to Asia for the first time. 
     
    A few years ago, Top Gear joined Pagani on its annual summertime supercar jaunt around Europe. But for this year, an insurer’s nightmare worth of Horacio’s carbon creations got on planes and made the trip to Japan to give its Asian customer base – of which there are many – a localised option. 
     
    Over the last few years Pagani – and its tour – has grown. With the help of his sons, Christopher and Leonardo, Horacio has expanded his factory to five times the original size, established serious outposts in Asia, and cracked America. It’s all thanks to the stunning Huayra, which has helped make his little Italian company a big player in the hypercar game.
     
    For this year’s tour, the plan was to do a loop from downtown Tokyo to Fuji Speedway and then back again. It took in some of the legendary roads and car venues including Daikoku PA, the Hakone Turnpike (the legendary eight and a half mile strip of private tarmac that meanders its way up the mountainside of the Kanagawa Prefecture) as well as a track day at Fuji Speedway. 
     
    But as usual, it was the cars that stole the show. Alongside the normal gaggle of Zondas and Huayras were two track animals. Yep, for the first time, Pagani’s mad track versions were let off the leash and came out to play. One being a delicious clear carbon Zonda R, the other a clear blue carbon Zonda Revolucion, both hitting the track at Fuji with its new 789bhp younger brother, the special edition Huayra BC. 
     
    Just think of the noise. The speed. And general awesome. Jealous much? Because we sure as hell are. 

  • Cars don’t get much more visually stimulating than what Pagani pumps out. From the first Zonda – through the crazy Revolucion and one-offs – to the latest and greatest Huayra (the BC), your eyes have a seemingly never-ending feast of intricate details and engineering to drink up. And as parts of the world go, Japan, with its contrasting neon cityscape and stunning countryside, is a pretty visually stimulating place to boot. 
     
    So what happens when you mix the two? Lots of good, that’s what. It’s exactly what happened recently when Pagani took its annual driving pilgrimage to Asia for the first time. 
     
    A few years ago, Top Gear joined Pagani on its annual summertime supercar jaunt around Europe. But for this year, an insurer’s nightmare worth of Horacio’s carbon creations got on planes and made the trip to Japan to give its Asian customer base – of which there are many – a localised option. 
     
    Over the last few years Pagani – and its tour – has grown. With the help of his sons, Christopher and Leonardo, Horacio has expanded his factory to five times the original size, established serious outposts in Asia, and cracked America. It’s all thanks to the stunning Huayra, which has helped make his little Italian company a big player in the hypercar game.
     
    For this year’s tour, the plan was to do a loop from downtown Tokyo to Fuji Speedway and then back again. It took in some of the legendary roads and car venues including Daikoku PA, the Hakone Turnpike (the legendary eight and a half mile strip of private tarmac that meanders its way up the mountainside of the Kanagawa Prefecture) as well as a track day at Fuji Speedway. 
     
    But as usual, it was the cars that stole the show. Alongside the normal gaggle of Zondas and Huayras were two track animals. Yep, for the first time, Pagani’s mad track versions were let off the leash and came out to play. One being a delicious clear carbon Zonda R, the other a clear blue carbon Zonda Revolucion, both hitting the track at Fuji with its new 789bhp younger brother, the special edition Huayra BC. 
     
    Just think of the noise. The speed. And general awesome. Jealous much? Because we sure as hell are. 

  • Cars don’t get much more visually stimulating than what Pagani pumps out. From the first Zonda – through the crazy Revolucion and one-offs – to the latest and greatest Huayra (the BC), your eyes have a seemingly never-ending feast of intricate details and engineering to drink up. And as parts of the world go, Japan, with its contrasting neon cityscape and stunning countryside, is a pretty visually stimulating place to boot. 
     
    So what happens when you mix the two? Lots of good, that’s what. It’s exactly what happened recently when Pagani took its annual driving pilgrimage to Asia for the first time. 
     
    A few years ago, Top Gear joined Pagani on its annual summertime supercar jaunt around Europe. But for this year, an insurer’s nightmare worth of Horacio’s carbon creations got on planes and made the trip to Japan to give its Asian customer base – of which there are many – a localised option. 
     
    Over the last few years Pagani – and its tour – has grown. With the help of his sons, Christopher and Leonardo, Horacio has expanded his factory to five times the original size, established serious outposts in Asia, and cracked America. It’s all thanks to the stunning Huayra, which has helped make his little Italian company a big player in the hypercar game.
     
    For this year’s tour, the plan was to do a loop from downtown Tokyo to Fuji Speedway and then back again. It took in some of the legendary roads and car venues including Daikoku PA, the Hakone Turnpike (the legendary eight and a half mile strip of private tarmac that meanders its way up the mountainside of the Kanagawa Prefecture) as well as a track day at Fuji Speedway. 
     
    But as usual, it was the cars that stole the show. Alongside the normal gaggle of Zondas and Huayras were two track animals. Yep, for the first time, Pagani’s mad track versions were let off the leash and came out to play. One being a delicious clear carbon Zonda R, the other a clear blue carbon Zonda Revolucion, both hitting the track at Fuji with its new 789bhp younger brother, the special edition Huayra BC. 
     
    Just think of the noise. The speed. And general awesome. Jealous much? Because we sure as hell are. 

  • Cars don’t get much more visually stimulating than what Pagani pumps out. From the first Zonda – through the crazy Revolucion and one-offs – to the latest and greatest Huayra (the BC), your eyes have a seemingly never-ending feast of intricate details and engineering to drink up. And as parts of the world go, Japan, with its contrasting neon cityscape and stunning countryside, is a pretty visually stimulating place to boot. 
     
    So what happens when you mix the two? Lots of good, that’s what. It’s exactly what happened recently when Pagani took its annual driving pilgrimage to Asia for the first time. 
     
    A few years ago, Top Gear joined Pagani on its annual summertime supercar jaunt around Europe. But for this year, an insurer’s nightmare worth of Horacio’s carbon creations got on planes and made the trip to Japan to give its Asian customer base – of which there are many – a localised option. 
     
    Over the last few years Pagani – and its tour – has grown. With the help of his sons, Christopher and Leonardo, Horacio has expanded his factory to five times the original size, established serious outposts in Asia, and cracked America. It’s all thanks to the stunning Huayra, which has helped make his little Italian company a big player in the hypercar game.
     
    For this year’s tour, the plan was to do a loop from downtown Tokyo to Fuji Speedway and then back again. It took in some of the legendary roads and car venues including Daikoku PA, the Hakone Turnpike (the legendary eight and a half mile strip of private tarmac that meanders its way up the mountainside of the Kanagawa Prefecture) as well as a track day at Fuji Speedway. 
     
    But as usual, it was the cars that stole the show. Alongside the normal gaggle of Zondas and Huayras were two track animals. Yep, for the first time, Pagani’s mad track versions were let off the leash and came out to play. One being a delicious clear carbon Zonda R, the other a clear blue carbon Zonda Revolucion, both hitting the track at Fuji with its new 789bhp younger brother, the special edition Huayra BC. 
     
    Just think of the noise. The speed. And general awesome. Jealous much? Because we sure as hell are. 

  • Cars don’t get much more visually stimulating than what Pagani pumps out. From the first Zonda – through the crazy Revolucion and one-offs – to the latest and greatest Huayra (the BC), your eyes have a seemingly never-ending feast of intricate details and engineering to drink up. And as parts of the world go, Japan, with its contrasting neon cityscape and stunning countryside, is a pretty visually stimulating place to boot. 
     
    So what happens when you mix the two? Lots of good, that’s what. It’s exactly what happened recently when Pagani took its annual driving pilgrimage to Asia for the first time. 
     
    A few years ago, Top Gear joined Pagani on its annual summertime supercar jaunt around Europe. But for this year, an insurer’s nightmare worth of Horacio’s carbon creations got on planes and made the trip to Japan to give its Asian customer base – of which there are many – a localised option. 
     
    Over the last few years Pagani – and its tour – has grown. With the help of his sons, Christopher and Leonardo, Horacio has expanded his factory to five times the original size, established serious outposts in Asia, and cracked America. It’s all thanks to the stunning Huayra, which has helped make his little Italian company a big player in the hypercar game.
     
    For this year’s tour, the plan was to do a loop from downtown Tokyo to Fuji Speedway and then back again. It took in some of the legendary roads and car venues including Daikoku PA, the Hakone Turnpike (the legendary eight and a half mile strip of private tarmac that meanders its way up the mountainside of the Kanagawa Prefecture) as well as a track day at Fuji Speedway. 
     
    But as usual, it was the cars that stole the show. Alongside the normal gaggle of Zondas and Huayras were two track animals. Yep, for the first time, Pagani’s mad track versions were let off the leash and came out to play. One being a delicious clear carbon Zonda R, the other a clear blue carbon Zonda Revolucion, both hitting the track at Fuji with its new 789bhp younger brother, the special edition Huayra BC. 
     
    Just think of the noise. The speed. And general awesome. Jealous much? Because we sure as hell are. 

  • Cars don’t get much more visually stimulating than what Pagani pumps out. From the first Zonda – through the crazy Revolucion and one-offs – to the latest and greatest Huayra (the BC), your eyes have a seemingly never-ending feast of intricate details and engineering to drink up. And as parts of the world go, Japan, with its contrasting neon cityscape and stunning countryside, is a pretty visually stimulating place to boot. 
     
    So what happens when you mix the two? Lots of good, that’s what. It’s exactly what happened recently when Pagani took its annual driving pilgrimage to Asia for the first time. 
     
    A few years ago, Top Gear joined Pagani on its annual summertime supercar jaunt around Europe. But for this year, an insurer’s nightmare worth of Horacio’s carbon creations got on planes and made the trip to Japan to give its Asian customer base – of which there are many – a localised option. 
     
    Over the last few years Pagani – and its tour – has grown. With the help of his sons, Christopher and Leonardo, Horacio has expanded his factory to five times the original size, established serious outposts in Asia, and cracked America. It’s all thanks to the stunning Huayra, which has helped make his little Italian company a big player in the hypercar game.
     
    For this year’s tour, the plan was to do a loop from downtown Tokyo to Fuji Speedway and then back again. It took in some of the legendary roads and car venues including Daikoku PA, the Hakone Turnpike (the legendary eight and a half mile strip of private tarmac that meanders its way up the mountainside of the Kanagawa Prefecture) as well as a track day at Fuji Speedway. 
     
    But as usual, it was the cars that stole the show. Alongside the normal gaggle of Zondas and Huayras were two track animals. Yep, for the first time, Pagani’s mad track versions were let off the leash and came out to play. One being a delicious clear carbon Zonda R, the other a clear blue carbon Zonda Revolucion, both hitting the track at Fuji with its new 789bhp younger brother, the special edition Huayra BC. 
     
    Just think of the noise. The speed. And general awesome. Jealous much? Because we sure as hell are. 

  • Cars don’t get much more visually stimulating than what Pagani pumps out. From the first Zonda – through the crazy Revolucion and one-offs – to the latest and greatest Huayra (the BC), your eyes have a seemingly never-ending feast of intricate details and engineering to drink up. And as parts of the world go, Japan, with its contrasting neon cityscape and stunning countryside, is a pretty visually stimulating place to boot. 
     
    So what happens when you mix the two? Lots of good, that’s what. It’s exactly what happened recently when Pagani took its annual driving pilgrimage to Asia for the first time. 
     
    A few years ago, Top Gear joined Pagani on its annual summertime supercar jaunt around Europe. But for this year, an insurer’s nightmare worth of Horacio’s carbon creations got on planes and made the trip to Japan to give its Asian customer base – of which there are many – a localised option. 
     
    Over the last few years Pagani – and its tour – has grown. With the help of his sons, Christopher and Leonardo, Horacio has expanded his factory to five times the original size, established serious outposts in Asia, and cracked America. It’s all thanks to the stunning Huayra, which has helped make his little Italian company a big player in the hypercar game.
     
    For this year’s tour, the plan was to do a loop from downtown Tokyo to Fuji Speedway and then back again. It took in some of the legendary roads and car venues including Daikoku PA, the Hakone Turnpike (the legendary eight and a half mile strip of private tarmac that meanders its way up the mountainside of the Kanagawa Prefecture) as well as a track day at Fuji Speedway. 
     
    But as usual, it was the cars that stole the show. Alongside the normal gaggle of Zondas and Huayras were two track animals. Yep, for the first time, Pagani’s mad track versions were let off the leash and came out to play. One being a delicious clear carbon Zonda R, the other a clear blue carbon Zonda Revolucion, both hitting the track at Fuji with its new 789bhp younger brother, the special edition Huayra BC. 
     
    Just think of the noise. The speed. And general awesome. Jealous much? Because we sure as hell are. 

  • Cars don’t get much more visually stimulating than what Pagani pumps out. From the first Zonda – through the crazy Revolucion and one-offs – to the latest and greatest Huayra (the BC), your eyes have a seemingly never-ending feast of intricate details and engineering to drink up. And as parts of the world go, Japan, with its contrasting neon cityscape and stunning countryside, is a pretty visually stimulating place to boot. 
     
    So what happens when you mix the two? Lots of good, that’s what. It’s exactly what happened recently when Pagani took its annual driving pilgrimage to Asia for the first time. 
     
    A few years ago, Top Gear joined Pagani on its annual summertime supercar jaunt around Europe. But for this year, an insurer’s nightmare worth of Horacio’s carbon creations got on planes and made the trip to Japan to give its Asian customer base – of which there are many – a localised option. 
     
    Over the last few years Pagani – and its tour – has grown. With the help of his sons, Christopher and Leonardo, Horacio has expanded his factory to five times the original size, established serious outposts in Asia, and cracked America. It’s all thanks to the stunning Huayra, which has helped make his little Italian company a big player in the hypercar game.
     
    For this year’s tour, the plan was to do a loop from downtown Tokyo to Fuji Speedway and then back again. It took in some of the legendary roads and car venues including Daikoku PA, the Hakone Turnpike (the legendary eight and a half mile strip of private tarmac that meanders its way up the mountainside of the Kanagawa Prefecture) as well as a track day at Fuji Speedway. 
     
    But as usual, it was the cars that stole the show. Alongside the normal gaggle of Zondas and Huayras were two track animals. Yep, for the first time, Pagani’s mad track versions were let off the leash and came out to play. One being a delicious clear carbon Zonda R, the other a clear blue carbon Zonda Revolucion, both hitting the track at Fuji with its new 789bhp younger brother, the special edition Huayra BC. 
     
    Just think of the noise. The speed. And general awesome. Jealous much? Because we sure as hell are. 

  • Cars don’t get much more visually stimulating than what Pagani pumps out. From the first Zonda – through the crazy Revolucion and one-offs – to the latest and greatest Huayra (the BC), your eyes have a seemingly never-ending feast of intricate details and engineering to drink up. And as parts of the world go, Japan, with its contrasting neon cityscape and stunning countryside, is a pretty visually stimulating place to boot. 
     
    So what happens when you mix the two? Lots of good, that’s what. It’s exactly what happened recently when Pagani took its annual driving pilgrimage to Asia for the first time. 
     
    A few years ago, Top Gear joined Pagani on its annual summertime supercar jaunt around Europe. But for this year, an insurer’s nightmare worth of Horacio’s carbon creations got on planes and made the trip to Japan to give its Asian customer base – of which there are many – a localised option. 
     
    Over the last few years Pagani – and its tour – has grown. With the help of his sons, Christopher and Leonardo, Horacio has expanded his factory to five times the original size, established serious outposts in Asia, and cracked America. It’s all thanks to the stunning Huayra, which has helped make his little Italian company a big player in the hypercar game.
     
    For this year’s tour, the plan was to do a loop from downtown Tokyo to Fuji Speedway and then back again. It took in some of the legendary roads and car venues including Daikoku PA, the Hakone Turnpike (the legendary eight and a half mile strip of private tarmac that meanders its way up the mountainside of the Kanagawa Prefecture) as well as a track day at Fuji Speedway. 
     
    But as usual, it was the cars that stole the show. Alongside the normal gaggle of Zondas and Huayras were two track animals. Yep, for the first time, Pagani’s mad track versions were let off the leash and came out to play. One being a delicious clear carbon Zonda R, the other a clear blue carbon Zonda Revolucion, both hitting the track at Fuji with its new 789bhp younger brother, the special edition Huayra BC. 
     
    Just think of the noise. The speed. And general awesome. Jealous much? Because we sure as hell are. 

  • Cars don’t get much more visually stimulating than what Pagani pumps out. From the first Zonda – through the crazy Revolucion and one-offs – to the latest and greatest Huayra (the BC), your eyes have a seemingly never-ending feast of intricate details and engineering to drink up. And as parts of the world go, Japan, with its contrasting neon cityscape and stunning countryside, is a pretty visually stimulating place to boot. 
     
    So what happens when you mix the two? Lots of good, that’s what. It’s exactly what happened recently when Pagani took its annual driving pilgrimage to Asia for the first time. 
     
    A few years ago, Top Gear joined Pagani on its annual summertime supercar jaunt around Europe. But for this year, an insurer’s nightmare worth of Horacio’s carbon creations got on planes and made the trip to Japan to give its Asian customer base – of which there are many – a localised option. 
     
    Over the last few years Pagani – and its tour – has grown. With the help of his sons, Christopher and Leonardo, Horacio has expanded his factory to five times the original size, established serious outposts in Asia, and cracked America. It’s all thanks to the stunning Huayra, which has helped make his little Italian company a big player in the hypercar game.
     
    For this year’s tour, the plan was to do a loop from downtown Tokyo to Fuji Speedway and then back again. It took in some of the legendary roads and car venues including Daikoku PA, the Hakone Turnpike (the legendary eight and a half mile strip of private tarmac that meanders its way up the mountainside of the Kanagawa Prefecture) as well as a track day at Fuji Speedway. 
     
    But as usual, it was the cars that stole the show. Alongside the normal gaggle of Zondas and Huayras were two track animals. Yep, for the first time, Pagani’s mad track versions were let off the leash and came out to play. One being a delicious clear carbon Zonda R, the other a clear blue carbon Zonda Revolucion, both hitting the track at Fuji with its new 789bhp younger brother, the special edition Huayra BC. 
     
    Just think of the noise. The speed. And general awesome. Jealous much? Because we sure as hell are. 

  • Cars don’t get much more visually stimulating than what Pagani pumps out. From the first Zonda – through the crazy Revolucion and one-offs – to the latest and greatest Huayra (the BC), your eyes have a seemingly never-ending feast of intricate details and engineering to drink up. And as parts of the world go, Japan, with its contrasting neon cityscape and stunning countryside, is a pretty visually stimulating place to boot. 
     
    So what happens when you mix the two? Lots of good, that’s what. It’s exactly what happened recently when Pagani took its annual driving pilgrimage to Asia for the first time. 
     
    A few years ago, Top Gear joined Pagani on its annual summertime supercar jaunt around Europe. But for this year, an insurer’s nightmare worth of Horacio’s carbon creations got on planes and made the trip to Japan to give its Asian customer base – of which there are many – a localised option. 
     
    Over the last few years Pagani – and its tour – has grown. With the help of his sons, Christopher and Leonardo, Horacio has expanded his factory to five times the original size, established serious outposts in Asia, and cracked America. It’s all thanks to the stunning Huayra, which has helped make his little Italian company a big player in the hypercar game.
     
    For this year’s tour, the plan was to do a loop from downtown Tokyo to Fuji Speedway and then back again. It took in some of the legendary roads and car venues including Daikoku PA, the Hakone Turnpike (the legendary eight and a half mile strip of private tarmac that meanders its way up the mountainside of the Kanagawa Prefecture) as well as a track day at Fuji Speedway. 
     
    But as usual, it was the cars that stole the show. Alongside the normal gaggle of Zondas and Huayras were two track animals. Yep, for the first time, Pagani’s mad track versions were let off the leash and came out to play. One being a delicious clear carbon Zonda R, the other a clear blue carbon Zonda Revolucion, both hitting the track at Fuji with its new 789bhp younger brother, the special edition Huayra BC. 
     
    Just think of the noise. The speed. And general awesome. Jealous much? Because we sure as hell are. 

  • Cars don’t get much more visually stimulating than what Pagani pumps out. From the first Zonda – through the crazy Revolucion and one-offs – to the latest and greatest Huayra (the BC), your eyes have a seemingly never-ending feast of intricate details and engineering to drink up. And as parts of the world go, Japan, with its contrasting neon cityscape and stunning countryside, is a pretty visually stimulating place to boot. 
     
    So what happens when you mix the two? Lots of good, that’s what. It’s exactly what happened recently when Pagani took its annual driving pilgrimage to Asia for the first time. 
     
    A few years ago, Top Gear joined Pagani on its annual summertime supercar jaunt around Europe. But for this year, an insurer’s nightmare worth of Horacio’s carbon creations got on planes and made the trip to Japan to give its Asian customer base – of which there are many – a localised option. 
     
    Over the last few years Pagani – and its tour – has grown. With the help of his sons, Christopher and Leonardo, Horacio has expanded his factory to five times the original size, established serious outposts in Asia, and cracked America. It’s all thanks to the stunning Huayra, which has helped make his little Italian company a big player in the hypercar game.
     
    For this year’s tour, the plan was to do a loop from downtown Tokyo to Fuji Speedway and then back again. It took in some of the legendary roads and car venues including Daikoku PA, the Hakone Turnpike (the legendary eight and a half mile strip of private tarmac that meanders its way up the mountainside of the Kanagawa Prefecture) as well as a track day at Fuji Speedway. 
     
    But as usual, it was the cars that stole the show. Alongside the normal gaggle of Zondas and Huayras were two track animals. Yep, for the first time, Pagani’s mad track versions were let off the leash and came out to play. One being a delicious clear carbon Zonda R, the other a clear blue carbon Zonda Revolucion, both hitting the track at Fuji with its new 789bhp younger brother, the special edition Huayra BC. 
     
    Just think of the noise. The speed. And general awesome. Jealous much? Because we sure as hell are. 

  • Cars don’t get much more visually stimulating than what Pagani pumps out. From the first Zonda – through the crazy Revolucion and one-offs – to the latest and greatest Huayra (the BC), your eyes have a seemingly never-ending feast of intricate details and engineering to drink up. And as parts of the world go, Japan, with its contrasting neon cityscape and stunning countryside, is a pretty visually stimulating place to boot. 
     
    So what happens when you mix the two? Lots of good, that’s what. It’s exactly what happened recently when Pagani took its annual driving pilgrimage to Asia for the first time. 
     
    A few years ago, Top Gear joined Pagani on its annual summertime supercar jaunt around Europe. But for this year, an insurer’s nightmare worth of Horacio’s carbon creations got on planes and made the trip to Japan to give its Asian customer base – of which there are many – a localised option. 
     
    Over the last few years Pagani – and its tour – has grown. With the help of his sons, Christopher and Leonardo, Horacio has expanded his factory to five times the original size, established serious outposts in Asia, and cracked America. It’s all thanks to the stunning Huayra, which has helped make his little Italian company a big player in the hypercar game.
     
    For this year’s tour, the plan was to do a loop from downtown Tokyo to Fuji Speedway and then back again. It took in some of the legendary roads and car venues including Daikoku PA, the Hakone Turnpike (the legendary eight and a half mile strip of private tarmac that meanders its way up the mountainside of the Kanagawa Prefecture) as well as a track day at Fuji Speedway. 
     
    But as usual, it was the cars that stole the show. Alongside the normal gaggle of Zondas and Huayras were two track animals. Yep, for the first time, Pagani’s mad track versions were let off the leash and came out to play. One being a delicious clear carbon Zonda R, the other a clear blue carbon Zonda Revolucion, both hitting the track at Fuji with its new 789bhp younger brother, the special edition Huayra BC. 
     
    Just think of the noise. The speed. And general awesome. Jealous much? Because we sure as hell are. 

  • Cars don’t get much more visually stimulating than what Pagani pumps out. From the first Zonda – through the crazy Revolucion and one-offs – to the latest and greatest Huayra (the BC), your eyes have a seemingly never-ending feast of intricate details and engineering to drink up. And as parts of the world go, Japan, with its contrasting neon cityscape and stunning countryside, is a pretty visually stimulating place to boot. 
     
    So what happens when you mix the two? Lots of good, that’s what. It’s exactly what happened recently when Pagani took its annual driving pilgrimage to Asia for the first time. 
     
    A few years ago, Top Gear joined Pagani on its annual summertime supercar jaunt around Europe. But for this year, an insurer’s nightmare worth of Horacio’s carbon creations got on planes and made the trip to Japan to give its Asian customer base – of which there are many – a localised option. 
     
    Over the last few years Pagani – and its tour – has grown. With the help of his sons, Christopher and Leonardo, Horacio has expanded his factory to five times the original size, established serious outposts in Asia, and cracked America. It’s all thanks to the stunning Huayra, which has helped make his little Italian company a big player in the hypercar game.
     
    For this year’s tour, the plan was to do a loop from downtown Tokyo to Fuji Speedway and then back again. It took in some of the legendary roads and car venues including Daikoku PA, the Hakone Turnpike (the legendary eight and a half mile strip of private tarmac that meanders its way up the mountainside of the Kanagawa Prefecture) as well as a track day at Fuji Speedway. 
     
    But as usual, it was the cars that stole the show. Alongside the normal gaggle of Zondas and Huayras were two track animals. Yep, for the first time, Pagani’s mad track versions were let off the leash and came out to play. One being a delicious clear carbon Zonda R, the other a clear blue carbon Zonda Revolucion, both hitting the track at Fuji with its new 789bhp younger brother, the special edition Huayra BC. 
     
    Just think of the noise. The speed. And general awesome. Jealous much? Because we sure as hell are. 

  • Cars don’t get much more visually stimulating than what Pagani pumps out. From the first Zonda – through the crazy Revolucion and one-offs – to the latest and greatest Huayra (the BC), your eyes have a seemingly never-ending feast of intricate details and engineering to drink up. And as parts of the world go, Japan, with its contrasting neon cityscape and stunning countryside, is a pretty visually stimulating place to boot. 
     
    So what happens when you mix the two? Lots of good, that’s what. It’s exactly what happened recently when Pagani took its annual driving pilgrimage to Asia for the first time. 
     
    A few years ago, Top Gear joined Pagani on its annual summertime supercar jaunt around Europe. But for this year, an insurer’s nightmare worth of Horacio’s carbon creations got on planes and made the trip to Japan to give its Asian customer base – of which there are many – a localised option. 
     
    Over the last few years Pagani – and its tour – has grown. With the help of his sons, Christopher and Leonardo, Horacio has expanded his factory to five times the original size, established serious outposts in Asia, and cracked America. It’s all thanks to the stunning Huayra, which has helped make his little Italian company a big player in the hypercar game.
     
    For this year’s tour, the plan was to do a loop from downtown Tokyo to Fuji Speedway and then back again. It took in some of the legendary roads and car venues including Daikoku PA, the Hakone Turnpike (the legendary eight and a half mile strip of private tarmac that meanders its way up the mountainside of the Kanagawa Prefecture) as well as a track day at Fuji Speedway. 
     
    But as usual, it was the cars that stole the show. Alongside the normal gaggle of Zondas and Huayras were two track animals. Yep, for the first time, Pagani’s mad track versions were let off the leash and came out to play. One being a delicious clear carbon Zonda R, the other a clear blue carbon Zonda Revolucion, both hitting the track at Fuji with its new 789bhp younger brother, the special edition Huayra BC. 
     
    Just think of the noise. The speed. And general awesome. Jealous much? Because we sure as hell are. 

  • Cars don’t get much more visually stimulating than what Pagani pumps out. From the first Zonda – through the crazy Revolucion and one-offs – to the latest and greatest Huayra (the BC), your eyes have a seemingly never-ending feast of intricate details and engineering to drink up. And as parts of the world go, Japan, with its contrasting neon cityscape and stunning countryside, is a pretty visually stimulating place to boot. 
     
    So what happens when you mix the two? Lots of good, that’s what. It’s exactly what happened recently when Pagani took its annual driving pilgrimage to Asia for the first time. 
     
    A few years ago, Top Gear joined Pagani on its annual summertime supercar jaunt around Europe. But for this year, an insurer’s nightmare worth of Horacio’s carbon creations got on planes and made the trip to Japan to give its Asian customer base – of which there are many – a localised option. 
     
    Over the last few years Pagani – and its tour – has grown. With the help of his sons, Christopher and Leonardo, Horacio has expanded his factory to five times the original size, established serious outposts in Asia, and cracked America. It’s all thanks to the stunning Huayra, which has helped make his little Italian company a big player in the hypercar game.
     
    For this year’s tour, the plan was to do a loop from downtown Tokyo to Fuji Speedway and then back again. It took in some of the legendary roads and car venues including Daikoku PA, the Hakone Turnpike (the legendary eight and a half mile strip of private tarmac that meanders its way up the mountainside of the Kanagawa Prefecture) as well as a track day at Fuji Speedway. 
     
    But as usual, it was the cars that stole the show. Alongside the normal gaggle of Zondas and Huayras were two track animals. Yep, for the first time, Pagani’s mad track versions were let off the leash and came out to play. One being a delicious clear carbon Zonda R, the other a clear blue carbon Zonda Revolucion, both hitting the track at Fuji with its new 789bhp younger brother, the special edition Huayra BC. 
     
    Just think of the noise. The speed. And general awesome. Jealous much? Because we sure as hell are. 

  • Cars don’t get much more visually stimulating than what Pagani pumps out. From the first Zonda – through the crazy Revolucion and one-offs – to the latest and greatest Huayra (the BC), your eyes have a seemingly never-ending feast of intricate details and engineering to drink up. And as parts of the world go, Japan, with its contrasting neon cityscape and stunning countryside, is a pretty visually stimulating place to boot. 
     
    So what happens when you mix the two? Lots of good, that’s what. It’s exactly what happened recently when Pagani took its annual driving pilgrimage to Asia for the first time. 
     
    A few years ago, Top Gear joined Pagani on its annual summertime supercar jaunt around Europe. But for this year, an insurer’s nightmare worth of Horacio’s carbon creations got on planes and made the trip to Japan to give its Asian customer base – of which there are many – a localised option. 
     
    Over the last few years Pagani – and its tour – has grown. With the help of his sons, Christopher and Leonardo, Horacio has expanded his factory to five times the original size, established serious outposts in Asia, and cracked America. It’s all thanks to the stunning Huayra, which has helped make his little Italian company a big player in the hypercar game.
     
    For this year’s tour, the plan was to do a loop from downtown Tokyo to Fuji Speedway and then back again. It took in some of the legendary roads and car venues including Daikoku PA, the Hakone Turnpike (the legendary eight and a half mile strip of private tarmac that meanders its way up the mountainside of the Kanagawa Prefecture) as well as a track day at Fuji Speedway. 
     
    But as usual, it was the cars that stole the show. Alongside the normal gaggle of Zondas and Huayras were two track animals. Yep, for the first time, Pagani’s mad track versions were let off the leash and came out to play. One being a delicious clear carbon Zonda R, the other a clear blue carbon Zonda Revolucion, both hitting the track at Fuji with its new 789bhp younger brother, the special edition Huayra BC. 
     
    Just think of the noise. The speed. And general awesome. Jealous much? Because we sure as hell are. 

  • Cars don’t get much more visually stimulating than what Pagani pumps out. From the first Zonda – through the crazy Revolucion and one-offs – to the latest and greatest Huayra (the BC), your eyes have a seemingly never-ending feast of intricate details and engineering to drink up. And as parts of the world go, Japan, with its contrasting neon cityscape and stunning countryside, is a pretty visually stimulating place to boot. 
     
    So what happens when you mix the two? Lots of good, that’s what. It’s exactly what happened recently when Pagani took its annual driving pilgrimage to Asia for the first time. 
     
    A few years ago, Top Gear joined Pagani on its annual summertime supercar jaunt around Europe. But for this year, an insurer’s nightmare worth of Horacio’s carbon creations got on planes and made the trip to Japan to give its Asian customer base – of which there are many – a localised option. 
     
    Over the last few years Pagani – and its tour – has grown. With the help of his sons, Christopher and Leonardo, Horacio has expanded his factory to five times the original size, established serious outposts in Asia, and cracked America. It’s all thanks to the stunning Huayra, which has helped make his little Italian company a big player in the hypercar game.
     
    For this year’s tour, the plan was to do a loop from downtown Tokyo to Fuji Speedway and then back again. It took in some of the legendary roads and car venues including Daikoku PA, the Hakone Turnpike (the legendary eight and a half mile strip of private tarmac that meanders its way up the mountainside of the Kanagawa Prefecture) as well as a track day at Fuji Speedway. 
     
    But as usual, it was the cars that stole the show. Alongside the normal gaggle of Zondas and Huayras were two track animals. Yep, for the first time, Pagani’s mad track versions were let off the leash and came out to play. One being a delicious clear carbon Zonda R, the other a clear blue carbon Zonda Revolucion, both hitting the track at Fuji with its new 789bhp younger brother, the special edition Huayra BC. 
     
    Just think of the noise. The speed. And general awesome. Jealous much? Because we sure as hell are. 

  • Cars don’t get much more visually stimulating than what Pagani pumps out. From the first Zonda – through the crazy Revolucion and one-offs – to the latest and greatest Huayra (the BC), your eyes have a seemingly never-ending feast of intricate details and engineering to drink up. And as parts of the world go, Japan, with its contrasting neon cityscape and stunning countryside, is a pretty visually stimulating place to boot. 
     
    So what happens when you mix the two? Lots of good, that’s what. It’s exactly what happened recently when Pagani took its annual driving pilgrimage to Asia for the first time. 
     
    A few years ago, Top Gear joined Pagani on its annual summertime supercar jaunt around Europe. But for this year, an insurer’s nightmare worth of Horacio’s carbon creations got on planes and made the trip to Japan to give its Asian customer base – of which there are many – a localised option. 
     
    Over the last few years Pagani – and its tour – has grown. With the help of his sons, Christopher and Leonardo, Horacio has expanded his factory to five times the original size, established serious outposts in Asia, and cracked America. It’s all thanks to the stunning Huayra, which has helped make his little Italian company a big player in the hypercar game.
     
    For this year’s tour, the plan was to do a loop from downtown Tokyo to Fuji Speedway and then back again. It took in some of the legendary roads and car venues including Daikoku PA, the Hakone Turnpike (the legendary eight and a half mile strip of private tarmac that meanders its way up the mountainside of the Kanagawa Prefecture) as well as a track day at Fuji Speedway. 
     
    But as usual, it was the cars that stole the show. Alongside the normal gaggle of Zondas and Huayras were two track animals. Yep, for the first time, Pagani’s mad track versions were let off the leash and came out to play. One being a delicious clear carbon Zonda R, the other a clear blue carbon Zonda Revolucion, both hitting the track at Fuji with its new 789bhp younger brother, the special edition Huayra BC. 
     
    Just think of the noise. The speed. And general awesome. Jealous much? Because we sure as hell are. 

  • Cars don’t get much more visually stimulating than what Pagani pumps out. From the first Zonda – through the crazy Revolucion and one-offs – to the latest and greatest Huayra (the BC), your eyes have a seemingly never-ending feast of intricate details and engineering to drink up. And as parts of the world go, Japan, with its contrasting neon cityscape and stunning countryside, is a pretty visually stimulating place to boot. 
     
    So what happens when you mix the two? Lots of good, that’s what. It’s exactly what happened recently when Pagani took its annual driving pilgrimage to Asia for the first time. 
     
    A few years ago, Top Gear joined Pagani on its annual summertime supercar jaunt around Europe. But for this year, an insurer’s nightmare worth of Horacio’s carbon creations got on planes and made the trip to Japan to give its Asian customer base – of which there are many – a localised option. 
     
    Over the last few years Pagani – and its tour – has grown. With the help of his sons, Christopher and Leonardo, Horacio has expanded his factory to five times the original size, established serious outposts in Asia, and cracked America. It’s all thanks to the stunning Huayra, which has helped make his little Italian company a big player in the hypercar game.
     
    For this year’s tour, the plan was to do a loop from downtown Tokyo to Fuji Speedway and then back again. It took in some of the legendary roads and car venues including Daikoku PA, the Hakone Turnpike (the legendary eight and a half mile strip of private tarmac that meanders its way up the mountainside of the Kanagawa Prefecture) as well as a track day at Fuji Speedway. 
     
    But as usual, it was the cars that stole the show. Alongside the normal gaggle of Zondas and Huayras were two track animals. Yep, for the first time, Pagani’s mad track versions were let off the leash and came out to play. One being a delicious clear carbon Zonda R, the other a clear blue carbon Zonda Revolucion, both hitting the track at Fuji with its new 789bhp younger brother, the special edition Huayra BC. 
     
    Just think of the noise. The speed. And general awesome. Jealous much? Because we sure as hell are. 

  • Cars don’t get much more visually stimulating than what Pagani pumps out. From the first Zonda – through the crazy Revolucion and one-offs – to the latest and greatest Huayra (the BC), your eyes have a seemingly never-ending feast of intricate details and engineering to drink up. And as parts of the world go, Japan, with its contrasting neon cityscape and stunning countryside, is a pretty visually stimulating place to boot. 
     
    So what happens when you mix the two? Lots of good, that’s what. It’s exactly what happened recently when Pagani took its annual driving pilgrimage to Asia for the first time. 
     
    A few years ago, Top Gear joined Pagani on its annual summertime supercar jaunt around Europe. But for this year, an insurer’s nightmare worth of Horacio’s carbon creations got on planes and made the trip to Japan to give its Asian customer base – of which there are many – a localised option. 
     
    Over the last few years Pagani – and its tour – has grown. With the help of his sons, Christopher and Leonardo, Horacio has expanded his factory to five times the original size, established serious outposts in Asia, and cracked America. It’s all thanks to the stunning Huayra, which has helped make his little Italian company a big player in the hypercar game.
     
    For this year’s tour, the plan was to do a loop from downtown Tokyo to Fuji Speedway and then back again. It took in some of the legendary roads and car venues including Daikoku PA, the Hakone Turnpike (the legendary eight and a half mile strip of private tarmac that meanders its way up the mountainside of the Kanagawa Prefecture) as well as a track day at Fuji Speedway. 
     
    But as usual, it was the cars that stole the show. Alongside the normal gaggle of Zondas and Huayras were two track animals. Yep, for the first time, Pagani’s mad track versions were let off the leash and came out to play. One being a delicious clear carbon Zonda R, the other a clear blue carbon Zonda Revolucion, both hitting the track at Fuji with its new 789bhp younger brother, the special edition Huayra BC. 
     
    Just think of the noise. The speed. And general awesome. Jealous much? Because we sure as hell are. 

  • Cars don’t get much more visually stimulating than what Pagani pumps out. From the first Zonda – through the crazy Revolucion and one-offs – to the latest and greatest Huayra (the BC), your eyes have a seemingly never-ending feast of intricate details and engineering to drink up. And as parts of the world go, Japan, with its contrasting neon cityscape and stunning countryside, is a pretty visually stimulating place to boot. 
     
    So what happens when you mix the two? Lots of good, that’s what. It’s exactly what happened recently when Pagani took its annual driving pilgrimage to Asia for the first time. 
     
    A few years ago, Top Gear joined Pagani on its annual summertime supercar jaunt around Europe. But for this year, an insurer’s nightmare worth of Horacio’s carbon creations got on planes and made the trip to Japan to give its Asian customer base – of which there are many – a localised option. 
     
    Over the last few years Pagani – and its tour – has grown. With the help of his sons, Christopher and Leonardo, Horacio has expanded his factory to five times the original size, established serious outposts in Asia, and cracked America. It’s all thanks to the stunning Huayra, which has helped make his little Italian company a big player in the hypercar game.
     
    For this year’s tour, the plan was to do a loop from downtown Tokyo to Fuji Speedway and then back again. It took in some of the legendary roads and car venues including Daikoku PA, the Hakone Turnpike (the legendary eight and a half mile strip of private tarmac that meanders its way up the mountainside of the Kanagawa Prefecture) as well as a track day at Fuji Speedway. 
     
    But as usual, it was the cars that stole the show. Alongside the normal gaggle of Zondas and Huayras were two track animals. Yep, for the first time, Pagani’s mad track versions were let off the leash and came out to play. One being a delicious clear carbon Zonda R, the other a clear blue carbon Zonda Revolucion, both hitting the track at Fuji with its new 789bhp younger brother, the special edition Huayra BC. 
     
    Just think of the noise. The speed. And general awesome. Jealous much? Because we sure as hell are. 

  • Cars don’t get much more visually stimulating than what Pagani pumps out. From the first Zonda – through the crazy Revolucion and one-offs – to the latest and greatest Huayra (the BC), your eyes have a seemingly never-ending feast of intricate details and engineering to drink up. And as parts of the world go, Japan, with its contrasting neon cityscape and stunning countryside, is a pretty visually stimulating place to boot. 
     
    So what happens when you mix the two? Lots of good, that’s what. It’s exactly what happened recently when Pagani took its annual driving pilgrimage to Asia for the first time. 
     
    A few years ago, Top Gear joined Pagani on its annual summertime supercar jaunt around Europe. But for this year, an insurer’s nightmare worth of Horacio’s carbon creations got on planes and made the trip to Japan to give its Asian customer base – of which there are many – a localised option. 
     
    Over the last few years Pagani – and its tour – has grown. With the help of his sons, Christopher and Leonardo, Horacio has expanded his factory to five times the original size, established serious outposts in Asia, and cracked America. It’s all thanks to the stunning Huayra, which has helped make his little Italian company a big player in the hypercar game.
     
    For this year’s tour, the plan was to do a loop from downtown Tokyo to Fuji Speedway and then back again. It took in some of the legendary roads and car venues including Daikoku PA, the Hakone Turnpike (the legendary eight and a half mile strip of private tarmac that meanders its way up the mountainside of the Kanagawa Prefecture) as well as a track day at Fuji Speedway. 
     
    But as usual, it was the cars that stole the show. Alongside the normal gaggle of Zondas and Huayras were two track animals. Yep, for the first time, Pagani’s mad track versions were let off the leash and came out to play. One being a delicious clear carbon Zonda R, the other a clear blue carbon Zonda Revolucion, both hitting the track at Fuji with its new 789bhp younger brother, the special edition Huayra BC. 
     
    Just think of the noise. The speed. And general awesome. Jealous much? Because we sure as hell are. 

  • Cars don’t get much more visually stimulating than what Pagani pumps out. From the first Zonda – through the crazy Revolucion and one-offs – to the latest and greatest Huayra (the BC), your eyes have a seemingly never-ending feast of intricate details and engineering to drink up. And as parts of the world go, Japan, with its contrasting neon cityscape and stunning countryside, is a pretty visually stimulating place to boot. 
     
    So what happens when you mix the two? Lots of good, that’s what. It’s exactly what happened recently when Pagani took its annual driving pilgrimage to Asia for the first time. 
     
    A few years ago, Top Gear joined Pagani on its annual summertime supercar jaunt around Europe. But for this year, an insurer’s nightmare worth of Horacio’s carbon creations got on planes and made the trip to Japan to give its Asian customer base – of which there are many – a localised option. 
     
    Over the last few years Pagani – and its tour – has grown. With the help of his sons, Christopher and Leonardo, Horacio has expanded his factory to five times the original size, established serious outposts in Asia, and cracked America. It’s all thanks to the stunning Huayra, which has helped make his little Italian company a big player in the hypercar game.
     
    For this year’s tour, the plan was to do a loop from downtown Tokyo to Fuji Speedway and then back again. It took in some of the legendary roads and car venues including Daikoku PA, the Hakone Turnpike (the legendary eight and a half mile strip of private tarmac that meanders its way up the mountainside of the Kanagawa Prefecture) as well as a track day at Fuji Speedway. 
     
    But as usual, it was the cars that stole the show. Alongside the normal gaggle of Zondas and Huayras were two track animals. Yep, for the first time, Pagani’s mad track versions were let off the leash and came out to play. One being a delicious clear carbon Zonda R, the other a clear blue carbon Zonda Revolucion, both hitting the track at Fuji with its new 789bhp younger brother, the special edition Huayra BC. 
     
    Just think of the noise. The speed. And general awesome. Jealous much? Because we sure as hell are. 

  • Cars don’t get much more visually stimulating than what Pagani pumps out. From the first Zonda – through the crazy Revolucion and one-offs – to the latest and greatest Huayra (the BC), your eyes have a seemingly never-ending feast of intricate details and engineering to drink up. And as parts of the world go, Japan, with its contrasting neon cityscape and stunning countryside, is a pretty visually stimulating place to boot. 
     
    So what happens when you mix the two? Lots of good, that’s what. It’s exactly what happened recently when Pagani took its annual driving pilgrimage to Asia for the first time. 
     
    A few years ago, Top Gear joined Pagani on its annual summertime supercar jaunt around Europe. But for this year, an insurer’s nightmare worth of Horacio’s carbon creations got on planes and made the trip to Japan to give its Asian customer base – of which there are many – a localised option. 
     
    Over the last few years Pagani – and its tour – has grown. With the help of his sons, Christopher and Leonardo, Horacio has expanded his factory to five times the original size, established serious outposts in Asia, and cracked America. It’s all thanks to the stunning Huayra, which has helped make his little Italian company a big player in the hypercar game.
     
    For this year’s tour, the plan was to do a loop from downtown Tokyo to Fuji Speedway and then back again. It took in some of the legendary roads and car venues including Daikoku PA, the Hakone Turnpike (the legendary eight and a half mile strip of private tarmac that meanders its way up the mountainside of the Kanagawa Prefecture) as well as a track day at Fuji Speedway. 
     
    But as usual, it was the cars that stole the show. Alongside the normal gaggle of Zondas and Huayras were two track animals. Yep, for the first time, Pagani’s mad track versions were let off the leash and came out to play. One being a delicious clear carbon Zonda R, the other a clear blue carbon Zonda Revolucion, both hitting the track at Fuji with its new 789bhp younger brother, the special edition Huayra BC. 
     
    Just think of the noise. The speed. And general awesome. Jealous much? Because we sure as hell are. 

  • Cars don’t get much more visually stimulating than what Pagani pumps out. From the first Zonda – through the crazy Revolucion and one-offs – to the latest and greatest Huayra (the BC), your eyes have a seemingly never-ending feast of intricate details and engineering to drink up. And as parts of the world go, Japan, with its contrasting neon cityscape and stunning countryside, is a pretty visually stimulating place to boot. 
     
    So what happens when you mix the two? Lots of good, that’s what. It’s exactly what happened recently when Pagani took its annual driving pilgrimage to Asia for the first time. 
     
    A few years ago, Top Gear joined Pagani on its annual summertime supercar jaunt around Europe. But for this year, an insurer’s nightmare worth of Horacio’s carbon creations got on planes and made the trip to Japan to give its Asian customer base – of which there are many – a localised option. 
     
    Over the last few years Pagani – and its tour – has grown. With the help of his sons, Christopher and Leonardo, Horacio has expanded his factory to five times the original size, established serious outposts in Asia, and cracked America. It’s all thanks to the stunning Huayra, which has helped make his little Italian company a big player in the hypercar game.
     
    For this year’s tour, the plan was to do a loop from downtown Tokyo to Fuji Speedway and then back again. It took in some of the legendary roads and car venues including Daikoku PA, the Hakone Turnpike (the legendary eight and a half mile strip of private tarmac that meanders its way up the mountainside of the Kanagawa Prefecture) as well as a track day at Fuji Speedway. 
     
    But as usual, it was the cars that stole the show. Alongside the normal gaggle of Zondas and Huayras were two track animals. Yep, for the first time, Pagani’s mad track versions were let off the leash and came out to play. One being a delicious clear carbon Zonda R, the other a clear blue carbon Zonda Revolucion, both hitting the track at Fuji with its new 789bhp younger brother, the special edition Huayra BC. 
     
    Just think of the noise. The speed. And general awesome. Jealous much? Because we sure as hell are. 

  • Cars don’t get much more visually stimulating than what Pagani pumps out. From the first Zonda – through the crazy Revolucion and one-offs – to the latest and greatest Huayra (the BC), your eyes have a seemingly never-ending feast of intricate details and engineering to drink up. And as parts of the world go, Japan, with its contrasting neon cityscape and stunning countryside, is a pretty visually stimulating place to boot. 
     
    So what happens when you mix the two? Lots of good, that’s what. It’s exactly what happened recently when Pagani took its annual driving pilgrimage to Asia for the first time. 
     
    A few years ago, Top Gear joined Pagani on its annual summertime supercar jaunt around Europe. But for this year, an insurer’s nightmare worth of Horacio’s carbon creations got on planes and made the trip to Japan to give its Asian customer base – of which there are many – a localised option. 
     
    Over the last few years Pagani – and its tour – has grown. With the help of his sons, Christopher and Leonardo, Horacio has expanded his factory to five times the original size, established serious outposts in Asia, and cracked America. It’s all thanks to the stunning Huayra, which has helped make his little Italian company a big player in the hypercar game.
     
    For this year’s tour, the plan was to do a loop from downtown Tokyo to Fuji Speedway and then back again. It took in some of the legendary roads and car venues including Daikoku PA, the Hakone Turnpike (the legendary eight and a half mile strip of private tarmac that meanders its way up the mountainside of the Kanagawa Prefecture) as well as a track day at Fuji Speedway. 
     
    But as usual, it was the cars that stole the show. Alongside the normal gaggle of Zondas and Huayras were two track animals. Yep, for the first time, Pagani’s mad track versions were let off the leash and came out to play. One being a delicious clear carbon Zonda R, the other a clear blue carbon Zonda Revolucion, both hitting the track at Fuji with its new 789bhp younger brother, the special edition Huayra BC. 
     
    Just think of the noise. The speed. And general awesome. Jealous much? Because we sure as hell are. 

  • Cars don’t get much more visually stimulating than what Pagani pumps out. From the first Zonda – through the crazy Revolucion and one-offs – to the latest and greatest Huayra (the BC), your eyes have a seemingly never-ending feast of intricate details and engineering to drink up. And as parts of the world go, Japan, with its contrasting neon cityscape and stunning countryside, is a pretty visually stimulating place to boot. 
     
    So what happens when you mix the two? Lots of good, that’s what. It’s exactly what happened recently when Pagani took its annual driving pilgrimage to Asia for the first time. 
     
    A few years ago, Top Gear joined Pagani on its annual summertime supercar jaunt around Europe. But for this year, an insurer’s nightmare worth of Horacio’s carbon creations got on planes and made the trip to Japan to give its Asian customer base – of which there are many – a localised option. 
     
    Over the last few years Pagani – and its tour – has grown. With the help of his sons, Christopher and Leonardo, Horacio has expanded his factory to five times the original size, established serious outposts in Asia, and cracked America. It’s all thanks to the stunning Huayra, which has helped make his little Italian company a big player in the hypercar game.
     
    For this year’s tour, the plan was to do a loop from downtown Tokyo to Fuji Speedway and then back again. It took in some of the legendary roads and car venues including Daikoku PA, the Hakone Turnpike (the legendary eight and a half mile strip of private tarmac that meanders its way up the mountainside of the Kanagawa Prefecture) as well as a track day at Fuji Speedway. 
     
    But as usual, it was the cars that stole the show. Alongside the normal gaggle of Zondas and Huayras were two track animals. Yep, for the first time, Pagani’s mad track versions were let off the leash and came out to play. One being a delicious clear carbon Zonda R, the other a clear blue carbon Zonda Revolucion, both hitting the track at Fuji with its new 789bhp younger brother, the special edition Huayra BC. 
     
    Just think of the noise. The speed. And general awesome. Jealous much? Because we sure as hell are. 

  • Cars don’t get much more visually stimulating than what Pagani pumps out. From the first Zonda – through the crazy Revolucion and one-offs – to the latest and greatest Huayra (the BC), your eyes have a seemingly never-ending feast of intricate details and engineering to drink up. And as parts of the world go, Japan, with its contrasting neon cityscape and stunning countryside, is a pretty visually stimulating place to boot. 
     
    So what happens when you mix the two? Lots of good, that’s what. It’s exactly what happened recently when Pagani took its annual driving pilgrimage to Asia for the first time. 
     
    A few years ago, Top Gear joined Pagani on its annual summertime supercar jaunt around Europe. But for this year, an insurer’s nightmare worth of Horacio’s carbon creations got on planes and made the trip to Japan to give its Asian customer base – of which there are many – a localised option. 
     
    Over the last few years Pagani – and its tour – has grown. With the help of his sons, Christopher and Leonardo, Horacio has expanded his factory to five times the original size, established serious outposts in Asia, and cracked America. It’s all thanks to the stunning Huayra, which has helped make his little Italian company a big player in the hypercar game.
     
    For this year’s tour, the plan was to do a loop from downtown Tokyo to Fuji Speedway and then back again. It took in some of the legendary roads and car venues including Daikoku PA, the Hakone Turnpike (the legendary eight and a half mile strip of private tarmac that meanders its way up the mountainside of the Kanagawa Prefecture) as well as a track day at Fuji Speedway. 
     
    But as usual, it was the cars that stole the show. Alongside the normal gaggle of Zondas and Huayras were two track animals. Yep, for the first time, Pagani’s mad track versions were let off the leash and came out to play. One being a delicious clear carbon Zonda R, the other a clear blue carbon Zonda Revolucion, both hitting the track at Fuji with its new 789bhp younger brother, the special edition Huayra BC. 
     
    Just think of the noise. The speed. And general awesome. Jealous much? Because we sure as hell are. 

  • Cars don’t get much more visually stimulating than what Pagani pumps out. From the first Zonda – through the crazy Revolucion and one-offs – to the latest and greatest Huayra (the BC), your eyes have a seemingly never-ending feast of intricate details and engineering to drink up. And as parts of the world go, Japan, with its contrasting neon cityscape and stunning countryside, is a pretty visually stimulating place to boot. 
     
    So what happens when you mix the two? Lots of good, that’s what. It’s exactly what happened recently when Pagani took its annual driving pilgrimage to Asia for the first time. 
     
    A few years ago, Top Gear joined Pagani on its annual summertime supercar jaunt around Europe. But for this year, an insurer’s nightmare worth of Horacio’s carbon creations got on planes and made the trip to Japan to give its Asian customer base – of which there are many – a localised option. 
     
    Over the last few years Pagani – and its tour – has grown. With the help of his sons, Christopher and Leonardo, Horacio has expanded his factory to five times the original size, established serious outposts in Asia, and cracked America. It’s all thanks to the stunning Huayra, which has helped make his little Italian company a big player in the hypercar game.
     
    For this year’s tour, the plan was to do a loop from downtown Tokyo to Fuji Speedway and then back again. It took in some of the legendary roads and car venues including Daikoku PA, the Hakone Turnpike (the legendary eight and a half mile strip of private tarmac that meanders its way up the mountainside of the Kanagawa Prefecture) as well as a track day at Fuji Speedway. 
     
    But as usual, it was the cars that stole the show. Alongside the normal gaggle of Zondas and Huayras were two track animals. Yep, for the first time, Pagani’s mad track versions were let off the leash and came out to play. One being a delicious clear carbon Zonda R, the other a clear blue carbon Zonda Revolucion, both hitting the track at Fuji with its new 789bhp younger brother, the special edition Huayra BC. 
     
    Just think of the noise. The speed. And general awesome. Jealous much? Because we sure as hell are. 

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