You have to check out these post-apocalyptic aerocars | Top Gear
Advertisement
BBC TopGear
BBC TopGear
Weird

You have to check out these post-apocalyptic aerocars

Jomar Machado’s exquisite renders have us praying for that sinister Jetson life

  • People’s view of the future in the Swinging Sixties is very different to the one that has panned out.

    Back then everyone was positive – drunk on suburban life and new-fangled technologies such as the colour television and stand-up refrigerator. So the outlook for the future was a world where we’d interact with elaborate robotic contraptions, go about our day-to-day lives with whimsical inventions and commute by flying into work using hover cars on a superhighway in the sky.

    You may have noticed this has failed to transpire. Yes, humankind is able to 3D print limbs, bring the woolly mammoth back from extinction and order McDonald's on UberEats, but we can’t yet fly to work in our cars. Boo.

    That doesn’t mean we can’t keep imagining. And with the power of 21st-century rendering and the magic of Photoshop, the hover car possibilities are now literally endless. Just check out the work of Brazilian visual artist, Jomar Machado, to see what we mean.

    Obsessed with cars and sci-fi (specifically Star Trek, Stars Wars, Babylon5, Dune and Blade Runner) he’s taken the concept of the flying car and added a bit of cynicism to it by making sure they could withstand the torture of a commute post apocalypse.

    From Bugattis to old Chevys (and a lot in between, including Mustangs, F1 cars and bikes), Jomar’s taken these foundations, and created a polished-yet-gritty style of weaponising and then de-wheeling them to create captivating images. Sometimes, he also likes to stay grounded, by applying wheels to some of his work.

    Producing renders like these is arduous and time intensive work. A single render can take up to two weeks to finish. The results however, are stunning.

    So, let us know what is your favourite below.

    Advertisement - Page continues below
  • People’s view of the future in the Swinging Sixties is very different to the one that has panned out.

    Back then everyone was positive – drunk on suburban life and new-fangled technologies such as the colour television and stand-up refrigerator. So the outlook for the future was a world where we’d interact with elaborate robotic contraptions, go about our day-to-day lives with whimsical inventions and commute by flying into work using hover cars on a superhighway in the sky.

    You may have noticed this has failed to transpire. Yes, humankind is able to 3D print limbs, bring the woolly mammoth back from extinction and order McDonald's on UberEats, but we can’t yet fly to work in our cars. Boo.

    That doesn’t mean we can’t keep imagining. And with the power of 21st-century rendering and the magic of Photoshop, the hover car possibilities are now literally endless. Just check out the work of Brazilian visual artist, Jomar Machado, to see what we mean.

    Obsessed with cars and sci-fi (specifically Star Trek, Stars Wars, Babylon5, Dune and Blade Runner) he’s taken the concept of the flying car and added a bit of cynicism to it by making sure they could withstand the torture of a commute post apocalypse.

    From Bugattis to old Chevys (and a lot in between, including Mustangs, F1 cars and bikes), Jomar’s taken these foundations, and created a polished-yet-gritty style of weaponising and then de-wheeling them to create captivating images. Sometimes, he also likes to stay grounded, by applying wheels to some of his work.

    Producing renders like these is arduous and time intensive work. A single render can take up to two weeks to finish. The results however, are stunning.

    So, let us know what is your favourite below.

  • People’s view of the future in the Swinging Sixties is very different to the one that has panned out.

    Back then everyone was positive – drunk on suburban life and new-fangled technologies such as the colour television and stand-up refrigerator. So the outlook for the future was a world where we’d interact with elaborate robotic contraptions, go about our day-to-day lives with whimsical inventions and commute by flying into work using hover cars on a superhighway in the sky.

    You may have noticed this has failed to transpire. Yes, humankind is able to 3D print limbs, bring the woolly mammoth back from extinction and order McDonald's on UberEats, but we can’t yet fly to work in our cars. Boo.

    That doesn’t mean we can’t keep imagining. And with the power of 21st-century rendering and the magic of Photoshop, the hover car possibilities are now literally endless. Just check out the work of Brazilian visual artist, Jomar Machado, to see what we mean.

    Obsessed with cars and sci-fi (specifically Star Trek, Stars Wars, Babylon5, Dune and Blade Runner) he’s taken the concept of the flying car and added a bit of cynicism to it by making sure they could withstand the torture of a commute post apocalypse.

    From Bugattis to old Chevys (and a lot in between, including Mustangs, F1 cars and bikes), Jomar’s taken these foundations, and created a polished-yet-gritty style of weaponising and then de-wheeling them to create captivating images. Sometimes, he also likes to stay grounded, by applying wheels to some of his work.

    Producing renders like these is arduous and time intensive work. A single render can take up to two weeks to finish. The results however, are stunning.

    So, let us know what is your favourite below.

    Advertisement - Page continues below
  • People’s view of the future in the Swinging Sixties is very different to the one that has panned out.

    Back then everyone was positive – drunk on suburban life and new-fangled technologies such as the colour television and stand-up refrigerator. So the outlook for the future was a world where we’d interact with elaborate robotic contraptions, go about our day-to-day lives with whimsical inventions and commute by flying into work using hover cars on a superhighway in the sky.

    You may have noticed this has failed to transpire. Yes, humankind is able to 3D print limbs, bring the woolly mammoth back from extinction and order McDonald's on UberEats, but we can’t yet fly to work in our cars. Boo.

    That doesn’t mean we can’t keep imagining. And with the power of 21st-century rendering and the magic of Photoshop, the hover car possibilities are now literally endless. Just check out the work of Brazilian visual artist, Jomar Machado, to see what we mean.

    Obsessed with cars and sci-fi (specifically Star Trek, Stars Wars, Babylon5, Dune and Blade Runner) he’s taken the concept of the flying car and added a bit of cynicism to it by making sure they could withstand the torture of a commute post apocalypse.

    From Bugattis to old Chevys (and a lot in between, including Mustangs, F1 cars and bikes), Jomar’s taken these foundations, and created a polished-yet-gritty style of weaponising and then de-wheeling them to create captivating images. Sometimes, he also likes to stay grounded, by applying wheels to some of his work.

    Producing renders like these is arduous and time intensive work. A single render can take up to two weeks to finish. The results however, are stunning.

    So, let us know what is your favourite below.

  • People’s view of the future in the Swinging Sixties is very different to the one that has panned out.

    Back then everyone was positive – drunk on suburban life and new-fangled technologies such as the colour television and stand-up refrigerator. So the outlook for the future was a world where we’d interact with elaborate robotic contraptions, go about our day-to-day lives with whimsical inventions and commute by flying into work using hover cars on a superhighway in the sky.

    You may have noticed this has failed to transpire. Yes, humankind is able to 3D print limbs, bring the woolly mammoth back from extinction and order McDonald's on UberEats, but we can’t yet fly to work in our cars. Boo.

    That doesn’t mean we can’t keep imagining. And with the power of 21st-century rendering and the magic of Photoshop, the hover car possibilities are now literally endless. Just check out the work of Brazilian visual artist, Jomar Machado, to see what we mean.

    Obsessed with cars and sci-fi (specifically Star Trek, Stars Wars, Babylon5, Dune and Blade Runner) he’s taken the concept of the flying car and added a bit of cynicism to it by making sure they could withstand the torture of a commute post apocalypse.

    From Bugattis to old Chevys (and a lot in between, including Mustangs, F1 cars and bikes), Jomar’s taken these foundations, and created a polished-yet-gritty style of weaponising and then de-wheeling them to create captivating images. Sometimes, he also likes to stay grounded, by applying wheels to some of his work.

    Producing renders like these is arduous and time intensive work. A single render can take up to two weeks to finish. The results however, are stunning.

    So, let us know what is your favourite below.

  • People’s view of the future in the Swinging Sixties is very different to the one that has panned out.

    Back then everyone was positive – drunk on suburban life and new-fangled technologies such as the colour television and stand-up refrigerator. So the outlook for the future was a world where we’d interact with elaborate robotic contraptions, go about our day-to-day lives with whimsical inventions and commute by flying into work using hover cars on a superhighway in the sky.

    You may have noticed this has failed to transpire. Yes, humankind is able to 3D print limbs, bring the woolly mammoth back from extinction and order McDonald's on UberEats, but we can’t yet fly to work in our cars. Boo.

    That doesn’t mean we can’t keep imagining. And with the power of 21st-century rendering and the magic of Photoshop, the hover car possibilities are now literally endless. Just check out the work of Brazilian visual artist, Jomar Machado, to see what we mean.

    Obsessed with cars and sci-fi (specifically Star Trek, Stars Wars, Babylon5, Dune and Blade Runner) he’s taken the concept of the flying car and added a bit of cynicism to it by making sure they could withstand the torture of a commute post apocalypse.

    From Bugattis to old Chevys (and a lot in between, including Mustangs, F1 cars and bikes), Jomar’s taken these foundations, and created a polished-yet-gritty style of weaponising and then de-wheeling them to create captivating images. Sometimes, he also likes to stay grounded, by applying wheels to some of his work.

    Producing renders like these is arduous and time intensive work. A single render can take up to two weeks to finish. The results however, are stunning.

    So, let us know what is your favourite below.

  • People’s view of the future in the Swinging Sixties is very different to the one that has panned out.

    Back then everyone was positive – drunk on suburban life and new-fangled technologies such as the colour television and stand-up refrigerator. So the outlook for the future was a world where we’d interact with elaborate robotic contraptions, go about our day-to-day lives with whimsical inventions and commute by flying into work using hover cars on a superhighway in the sky.

    You may have noticed this has failed to transpire. Yes, humankind is able to 3D print limbs, bring the woolly mammoth back from extinction and order McDonald's on UberEats, but we can’t yet fly to work in our cars. Boo.

    That doesn’t mean we can’t keep imagining. And with the power of 21st-century rendering and the magic of Photoshop, the hover car possibilities are now literally endless. Just check out the work of Brazilian visual artist, Jomar Machado, to see what we mean.

    Obsessed with cars and sci-fi (specifically Star Trek, Stars Wars, Babylon5, Dune and Blade Runner) he’s taken the concept of the flying car and added a bit of cynicism to it by making sure they could withstand the torture of a commute post apocalypse.

    From Bugattis to old Chevys (and a lot in between, including Mustangs, F1 cars and bikes), Jomar’s taken these foundations, and created a polished-yet-gritty style of weaponising and then de-wheeling them to create captivating images. Sometimes, he also likes to stay grounded, by applying wheels to some of his work.

    Producing renders like these is arduous and time intensive work. A single render can take up to two weeks to finish. The results however, are stunning.

    So, let us know what is your favourite below.

    Advertisement - Page continues below
  • People’s view of the future in the Swinging Sixties is very different to the one that has panned out.

    Back then everyone was positive – drunk on suburban life and new-fangled technologies such as the colour television and stand-up refrigerator. So the outlook for the future was a world where we’d interact with elaborate robotic contraptions, go about our day-to-day lives with whimsical inventions and commute by flying into work using hover cars on a superhighway in the sky.

    You may have noticed this has failed to transpire. Yes, humankind is able to 3D print limbs, bring the woolly mammoth back from extinction and order McDonald's on UberEats, but we can’t yet fly to work in our cars. Boo.

    That doesn’t mean we can’t keep imagining. And with the power of 21st-century rendering and the magic of Photoshop, the hover car possibilities are now literally endless. Just check out the work of Brazilian visual artist, Jomar Machado, to see what we mean.

    Obsessed with cars and sci-fi (specifically Star Trek, Stars Wars, Babylon5, Dune and Blade Runner) he’s taken the concept of the flying car and added a bit of cynicism to it by making sure they could withstand the torture of a commute post apocalypse.

    From Bugattis to old Chevys (and a lot in between, including Mustangs, F1 cars and bikes), Jomar’s taken these foundations, and created a polished-yet-gritty style of weaponising and then de-wheeling them to create captivating images. Sometimes, he also likes to stay grounded, by applying wheels to some of his work.

    Producing renders like these is arduous and time intensive work. A single render can take up to two weeks to finish. The results however, are stunning.

    So, let us know what is your favourite below.

  • People’s view of the future in the Swinging Sixties is very different to the one that has panned out.

    Back then everyone was positive – drunk on suburban life and new-fangled technologies such as the colour television and stand-up refrigerator. So the outlook for the future was a world where we’d interact with elaborate robotic contraptions, go about our day-to-day lives with whimsical inventions and commute by flying into work using hover cars on a superhighway in the sky.

    You may have noticed this has failed to transpire. Yes, humankind is able to 3D print limbs, bring the woolly mammoth back from extinction and order McDonald's on UberEats, but we can’t yet fly to work in our cars. Boo.

    That doesn’t mean we can’t keep imagining. And with the power of 21st-century rendering and the magic of Photoshop, the hover car possibilities are now literally endless. Just check out the work of Brazilian visual artist, Jomar Machado, to see what we mean.

    Obsessed with cars and sci-fi (specifically Star Trek, Stars Wars, Babylon5, Dune and Blade Runner) he’s taken the concept of the flying car and added a bit of cynicism to it by making sure they could withstand the torture of a commute post apocalypse.

    From Bugattis to old Chevys (and a lot in between, including Mustangs, F1 cars and bikes), Jomar’s taken these foundations, and created a polished-yet-gritty style of weaponising and then de-wheeling them to create captivating images. Sometimes, he also likes to stay grounded, by applying wheels to some of his work.

    Producing renders like these is arduous and time intensive work. A single render can take up to two weeks to finish. The results however, are stunning.

    So, let us know what is your favourite below.

    Advertisement - Page continues below
  • People’s view of the future in the Swinging Sixties is very different to the one that has panned out.

    Back then everyone was positive – drunk on suburban life and new-fangled technologies such as the colour television and stand-up refrigerator. So the outlook for the future was a world where we’d interact with elaborate robotic contraptions, go about our day-to-day lives with whimsical inventions and commute by flying into work using hover cars on a superhighway in the sky.

    You may have noticed this has failed to transpire. Yes, humankind is able to 3D print limbs, bring the woolly mammoth back from extinction and order McDonald's on UberEats, but we can’t yet fly to work in our cars. Boo.

    That doesn’t mean we can’t keep imagining. And with the power of 21st-century rendering and the magic of Photoshop, the hover car possibilities are now literally endless. Just check out the work of Brazilian visual artist, Jomar Machado, to see what we mean.

    Obsessed with cars and sci-fi (specifically Star Trek, Stars Wars, Babylon5, Dune and Blade Runner) he’s taken the concept of the flying car and added a bit of cynicism to it by making sure they could withstand the torture of a commute post apocalypse.

    From Bugattis to old Chevys (and a lot in between, including Mustangs, F1 cars and bikes), Jomar’s taken these foundations, and created a polished-yet-gritty style of weaponising and then de-wheeling them to create captivating images. Sometimes, he also likes to stay grounded, by applying wheels to some of his work.

    Producing renders like these is arduous and time intensive work. A single render can take up to two weeks to finish. The results however, are stunning.

    So, let us know what is your favourite below.

  • People’s view of the future in the Swinging Sixties is very different to the one that has panned out.

    Back then everyone was positive – drunk on suburban life and new-fangled technologies such as the colour television and stand-up refrigerator. So the outlook for the future was a world where we’d interact with elaborate robotic contraptions, go about our day-to-day lives with whimsical inventions and commute by flying into work using hover cars on a superhighway in the sky.

    You may have noticed this has failed to transpire. Yes, humankind is able to 3D print limbs, bring the woolly mammoth back from extinction and order McDonald's on UberEats, but we can’t yet fly to work in our cars. Boo.

    That doesn’t mean we can’t keep imagining. And with the power of 21st-century rendering and the magic of Photoshop, the hover car possibilities are now literally endless. Just check out the work of Brazilian visual artist, Jomar Machado, to see what we mean.

    Obsessed with cars and sci-fi (specifically Star Trek, Stars Wars, Babylon5, Dune and Blade Runner) he’s taken the concept of the flying car and added a bit of cynicism to it by making sure they could withstand the torture of a commute post apocalypse.

    From Bugattis to old Chevys (and a lot in between, including Mustangs, F1 cars and bikes), Jomar’s taken these foundations, and created a polished-yet-gritty style of weaponising and then de-wheeling them to create captivating images. Sometimes, he also likes to stay grounded, by applying wheels to some of his work.

    Producing renders like these is arduous and time intensive work. A single render can take up to two weeks to finish. The results however, are stunning.

    So, let us know what is your favourite below.

  • People’s view of the future in the Swinging Sixties is very different to the one that has panned out.

    Back then everyone was positive – drunk on suburban life and new-fangled technologies such as the colour television and stand-up refrigerator. So the outlook for the future was a world where we’d interact with elaborate robotic contraptions, go about our day-to-day lives with whimsical inventions and commute by flying into work using hover cars on a superhighway in the sky.

    You may have noticed this has failed to transpire. Yes, humankind is able to 3D print limbs, bring the woolly mammoth back from extinction and order McDonald's on UberEats, but we can’t yet fly to work in our cars. Boo.

    That doesn’t mean we can’t keep imagining. And with the power of 21st-century rendering and the magic of Photoshop, the hover car possibilities are now literally endless. Just check out the work of Brazilian visual artist, Jomar Machado, to see what we mean.

    Obsessed with cars and sci-fi (specifically Star Trek, Stars Wars, Babylon5, Dune and Blade Runner) he’s taken the concept of the flying car and added a bit of cynicism to it by making sure they could withstand the torture of a commute post apocalypse.

    From Bugattis to old Chevys (and a lot in between, including Mustangs, F1 cars and bikes), Jomar’s taken these foundations, and created a polished-yet-gritty style of weaponising and then de-wheeling them to create captivating images. Sometimes, he also likes to stay grounded, by applying wheels to some of his work.

    Producing renders like these is arduous and time intensive work. A single render can take up to two weeks to finish. The results however, are stunning.

    So, let us know what is your favourite below.

  • People’s view of the future in the Swinging Sixties is very different to the one that has panned out.

    Back then everyone was positive – drunk on suburban life and new-fangled technologies such as the colour television and stand-up refrigerator. So the outlook for the future was a world where we’d interact with elaborate robotic contraptions, go about our day-to-day lives with whimsical inventions and commute by flying into work using hover cars on a superhighway in the sky.

    You may have noticed this has failed to transpire. Yes, humankind is able to 3D print limbs, bring the woolly mammoth back from extinction and order McDonald's on UberEats, but we can’t yet fly to work in our cars. Boo.

    That doesn’t mean we can’t keep imagining. And with the power of 21st-century rendering and the magic of Photoshop, the hover car possibilities are now literally endless. Just check out the work of Brazilian visual artist, Jomar Machado, to see what we mean.

    Obsessed with cars and sci-fi (specifically Star Trek, Stars Wars, Babylon5, Dune and Blade Runner) he’s taken the concept of the flying car and added a bit of cynicism to it by making sure they could withstand the torture of a commute post apocalypse.

    From Bugattis to old Chevys (and a lot in between, including Mustangs, F1 cars and bikes), Jomar’s taken these foundations, and created a polished-yet-gritty style of weaponising and then de-wheeling them to create captivating images. Sometimes, he also likes to stay grounded, by applying wheels to some of his work.

    Producing renders like these is arduous and time intensive work. A single render can take up to two weeks to finish. The results however, are stunning.

    So, let us know what is your favourite below.

  • People’s view of the future in the Swinging Sixties is very different to the one that has panned out.

    Back then everyone was positive – drunk on suburban life and new-fangled technologies such as the colour television and stand-up refrigerator. So the outlook for the future was a world where we’d interact with elaborate robotic contraptions, go about our day-to-day lives with whimsical inventions and commute by flying into work using hover cars on a superhighway in the sky.

    You may have noticed this has failed to transpire. Yes, humankind is able to 3D print limbs, bring the woolly mammoth back from extinction and order McDonald's on UberEats, but we can’t yet fly to work in our cars. Boo.

    That doesn’t mean we can’t keep imagining. And with the power of 21st-century rendering and the magic of Photoshop, the hover car possibilities are now literally endless. Just check out the work of Brazilian visual artist, Jomar Machado, to see what we mean.

    Obsessed with cars and sci-fi (specifically Star Trek, Stars Wars, Babylon5, Dune and Blade Runner) he’s taken the concept of the flying car and added a bit of cynicism to it by making sure they could withstand the torture of a commute post apocalypse.

    From Bugattis to old Chevys (and a lot in between, including Mustangs, F1 cars and bikes), Jomar’s taken these foundations, and created a polished-yet-gritty style of weaponising and then de-wheeling them to create captivating images. Sometimes, he also likes to stay grounded, by applying wheels to some of his work.

    Producing renders like these is arduous and time intensive work. A single render can take up to two weeks to finish. The results however, are stunning.

    So, let us know what is your favourite below.

  • People’s view of the future in the Swinging Sixties is very different to the one that has panned out.

    Back then everyone was positive – drunk on suburban life and new-fangled technologies such as the colour television and stand-up refrigerator. So the outlook for the future was a world where we’d interact with elaborate robotic contraptions, go about our day-to-day lives with whimsical inventions and commute by flying into work using hover cars on a superhighway in the sky.

    You may have noticed this has failed to transpire. Yes, humankind is able to 3D print limbs, bring the woolly mammoth back from extinction and order McDonald's on UberEats, but we can’t yet fly to work in our cars. Boo.

    That doesn’t mean we can’t keep imagining. And with the power of 21st-century rendering and the magic of Photoshop, the hover car possibilities are now literally endless. Just check out the work of Brazilian visual artist, Jomar Machado, to see what we mean.

    Obsessed with cars and sci-fi (specifically Star Trek, Stars Wars, Babylon5, Dune and Blade Runner) he’s taken the concept of the flying car and added a bit of cynicism to it by making sure they could withstand the torture of a commute post apocalypse.

    From Bugattis to old Chevys (and a lot in between, including Mustangs, F1 cars and bikes), Jomar’s taken these foundations, and created a polished-yet-gritty style of weaponising and then de-wheeling them to create captivating images. Sometimes, he also likes to stay grounded, by applying wheels to some of his work.

    Producing renders like these is arduous and time intensive work. A single render can take up to two weeks to finish. The results however, are stunning.

    So, let us know what is your favourite below.

  • People’s view of the future in the Swinging Sixties is very different to the one that has panned out.

    Back then everyone was positive – drunk on suburban life and new-fangled technologies such as the colour television and stand-up refrigerator. So the outlook for the future was a world where we’d interact with elaborate robotic contraptions, go about our day-to-day lives with whimsical inventions and commute by flying into work using hover cars on a superhighway in the sky.

    You may have noticed this has failed to transpire. Yes, humankind is able to 3D print limbs, bring the woolly mammoth back from extinction and order McDonald's on UberEats, but we can’t yet fly to work in our cars. Boo.

    That doesn’t mean we can’t keep imagining. And with the power of 21st-century rendering and the magic of Photoshop, the hover car possibilities are now literally endless. Just check out the work of Brazilian visual artist, Jomar Machado, to see what we mean.

    Obsessed with cars and sci-fi (specifically Star Trek, Stars Wars, Babylon5, Dune and Blade Runner) he’s taken the concept of the flying car and added a bit of cynicism to it by making sure they could withstand the torture of a commute post apocalypse.

    From Bugattis to old Chevys (and a lot in between, including Mustangs, F1 cars and bikes), Jomar’s taken these foundations, and created a polished-yet-gritty style of weaponising and then de-wheeling them to create captivating images. Sometimes, he also likes to stay grounded, by applying wheels to some of his work.

    Producing renders like these is arduous and time intensive work. A single render can take up to two weeks to finish. The results however, are stunning.

    So, let us know what is your favourite below.

  • People’s view of the future in the Swinging Sixties is very different to the one that has panned out.

    Back then everyone was positive – drunk on suburban life and new-fangled technologies such as the colour television and stand-up refrigerator. So the outlook for the future was a world where we’d interact with elaborate robotic contraptions, go about our day-to-day lives with whimsical inventions and commute by flying into work using hover cars on a superhighway in the sky.

    You may have noticed this has failed to transpire. Yes, humankind is able to 3D print limbs, bring the woolly mammoth back from extinction and order McDonald's on UberEats, but we can’t yet fly to work in our cars. Boo.

    That doesn’t mean we can’t keep imagining. And with the power of 21st-century rendering and the magic of Photoshop, the hover car possibilities are now literally endless. Just check out the work of Brazilian visual artist, Jomar Machado, to see what we mean.

    Obsessed with cars and sci-fi (specifically Star Trek, Stars Wars, Babylon5, Dune and Blade Runner) he’s taken the concept of the flying car and added a bit of cynicism to it by making sure they could withstand the torture of a commute post apocalypse.

    From Bugattis to old Chevys (and a lot in between, including Mustangs, F1 cars and bikes), Jomar’s taken these foundations, and created a polished-yet-gritty style of weaponising and then de-wheeling them to create captivating images. Sometimes, he also likes to stay grounded, by applying wheels to some of his work.

    Producing renders like these is arduous and time intensive work. A single render can take up to two weeks to finish. The results however, are stunning.

    So, let us know what is your favourite below.

  • People’s view of the future in the Swinging Sixties is very different to the one that has panned out.

    Back then everyone was positive – drunk on suburban life and new-fangled technologies such as the colour television and stand-up refrigerator. So the outlook for the future was a world where we’d interact with elaborate robotic contraptions, go about our day-to-day lives with whimsical inventions and commute by flying into work using hover cars on a superhighway in the sky.

    You may have noticed this has failed to transpire. Yes, humankind is able to 3D print limbs, bring the woolly mammoth back from extinction and order McDonald's on UberEats, but we can’t yet fly to work in our cars. Boo.

    That doesn’t mean we can’t keep imagining. And with the power of 21st-century rendering and the magic of Photoshop, the hover car possibilities are now literally endless. Just check out the work of Brazilian visual artist, Jomar Machado, to see what we mean.

    Obsessed with cars and sci-fi (specifically Star Trek, Stars Wars, Babylon5, Dune and Blade Runner) he’s taken the concept of the flying car and added a bit of cynicism to it by making sure they could withstand the torture of a commute post apocalypse.

    From Bugattis to old Chevys (and a lot in between, including Mustangs, F1 cars and bikes), Jomar’s taken these foundations, and created a polished-yet-gritty style of weaponising and then de-wheeling them to create captivating images. Sometimes, he also likes to stay grounded, by applying wheels to some of his work.

    Producing renders like these is arduous and time intensive work. A single render can take up to two weeks to finish. The results however, are stunning.

    So, let us know what is your favourite below.

  • People’s view of the future in the Swinging Sixties is very different to the one that has panned out.

    Back then everyone was positive – drunk on suburban life and new-fangled technologies such as the colour television and stand-up refrigerator. So the outlook for the future was a world where we’d interact with elaborate robotic contraptions, go about our day-to-day lives with whimsical inventions and commute by flying into work using hover cars on a superhighway in the sky.

    You may have noticed this has failed to transpire. Yes, humankind is able to 3D print limbs, bring the woolly mammoth back from extinction and order McDonald's on UberEats, but we can’t yet fly to work in our cars. Boo.

    That doesn’t mean we can’t keep imagining. And with the power of 21st-century rendering and the magic of Photoshop, the hover car possibilities are now literally endless. Just check out the work of Brazilian visual artist, Jomar Machado, to see what we mean.

    Obsessed with cars and sci-fi (specifically Star Trek, Stars Wars, Babylon5, Dune and Blade Runner) he’s taken the concept of the flying car and added a bit of cynicism to it by making sure they could withstand the torture of a commute post apocalypse.

    From Bugattis to old Chevys (and a lot in between, including Mustangs, F1 cars and bikes), Jomar’s taken these foundations, and created a polished-yet-gritty style of weaponising and then de-wheeling them to create captivating images. Sometimes, he also likes to stay grounded, by applying wheels to some of his work.

    Producing renders like these is arduous and time intensive work. A single render can take up to two weeks to finish. The results however, are stunning.

    So, let us know what is your favourite below.

More from Top Gear

Loading
See more on Weird

Promoted Content

Subscribe to the Top Gear Newsletter

Get all the latest news, reviews and exclusives, direct to your inbox.

By clicking subscribe, you agree to receive news, promotions and offers by email from Top Gear and BBC Studios. Your information will be used in accordance with our privacy policy.