Gallery: the rarest cars in the world go on a road trip | Top Gear
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Monday 28th November
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Gallery: the rarest cars in the world go on a road trip

You won’t believe the metal that has been thrashing around the Swiss Alps

  • At one end of the highly scientific Top Gear Car Club Spectrum you have youths meeting in dimly-lit car parks, swapping stickers and putting Burger King trays under their front-wheel-drive cars to drift. At the other, well, you have the above. Probably one of the most exclusive car clubs we’ve ever clapped eyes on.

    It’s called the Supercar Owners Circle, an exclusive fraternity of discerning car collectors that, refreshingly, don’t mind getting their ultra-exclusive cars out of their temperature-controlled humidor garages and take them for a good old thrashing. Specifically around the most picturesque roads nudging the Swiss/Italian border before blasting them down a runway against each other.

    See, no matter how many figures comprise your bank balance, the sense of community surrounding car ownership never changes. It’s just the cars that do. And what a set of cars. To gain access into the fold, you need to know all the secret handshakes and whistles that get you the rarest, limited-production cars in the worlds. Then you need to go ahead and buy them.

    A Ferrari 812 or McLaren 720S wouldn’t even get a look into this bunch; we’re talking Grade A one-offs or cars that were made by the handful. Rarities like a Ferrari Testarossa F.Z.93, Ferrari F12 TRS, Maserati MC12, Aston Vantage GT12 Roadster, Mercedes-Benz CLK GTR, Porsche 911 GT1 Straßenversion and reborn Lightweight Jaguar E-types.

    Since its launch in 2014, the Supercar Owners Circle has grown – now branching out with events springing up in Hong Kong and Abu Dhabi, and any other monied tax-efficient atoll where immense cars are located. Kids, if you need a club to aspire to be part of later on in life, this might be it. As a bit of inspo, check out the pics by Alex Penfold above. 

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  • At one end of the highly scientific Top Gear Car Club Spectrum you have youths meeting in dimly-lit car parks, swapping stickers and putting Burger King trays under their front-wheel-drive cars to drift. At the other, well, you have the above. Probably one of the most exclusive car clubs we’ve ever clapped eyes on.

    It’s called the Supercar Owners Circle, an exclusive fraternity of discerning car collectors that, refreshingly, don’t mind getting their ultra-exclusive cars out of their temperature-controlled humidor garages and take them for a good old thrashing. Specifically around the most picturesque roads nudging the Swiss/Italian border before blasting them down a runway against each other.

    See, no matter how many figures comprise your bank balance, the sense of community surrounding car ownership never changes. It’s just the cars that do. And what a set of cars. To gain access into the fold, you need to know all the secret handshakes and whistles that get you the rarest, limited-production cars in the worlds. Then you need to go ahead and buy them.

    A Ferrari 812 or McLaren 720S wouldn’t even get a look into this bunch; we’re talking Grade A one-offs or cars that were made by the handful. Rarities like a Ferrari Testarossa F.Z.93, Ferrari F12 TRS, Maserati MC12, Aston Vantage GT12 Roadster, Mercedes-Benz CLK GTR, Porsche 911 GT1 Straßenversion and reborn Lightweight Jaguar E-types.

    Since its launch in 2014, the Supercar Owners Circle has grown – now branching out with events springing up in Hong Kong and Abu Dhabi, and any other monied tax-efficient atoll where immense cars are located. Kids, if you need a club to aspire to be part of later on in life, this might be it. As a bit of inspo, check out the pics by Alex Penfold above. 

  • At one end of the highly scientific Top Gear Car Club Spectrum you have youths meeting in dimly-lit car parks, swapping stickers and putting Burger King trays under their front-wheel-drive cars to drift. At the other, well, you have the above. Probably one of the most exclusive car clubs we’ve ever clapped eyes on.

    It’s called the Supercar Owners Circle, an exclusive fraternity of discerning car collectors that, refreshingly, don’t mind getting their ultra-exclusive cars out of their temperature-controlled humidor garages and take them for a good old thrashing. Specifically around the most picturesque roads nudging the Swiss/Italian border before blasting them down a runway against each other.

    See, no matter how many figures comprise your bank balance, the sense of community surrounding car ownership never changes. It’s just the cars that do. And what a set of cars. To gain access into the fold, you need to know all the secret handshakes and whistles that get you the rarest, limited-production cars in the worlds. Then you need to go ahead and buy them.

    A Ferrari 812 or McLaren 720S wouldn’t even get a look into this bunch; we’re talking Grade A one-offs or cars that were made by the handful. Rarities like a Ferrari Testarossa F.Z.93, Ferrari F12 TRS, Maserati MC12, Aston Vantage GT12 Roadster, Mercedes-Benz CLK GTR, Porsche 911 GT1 Straßenversion and reborn Lightweight Jaguar E-types.

    Since its launch in 2014, the Supercar Owners Circle has grown – now branching out with events springing up in Hong Kong and Abu Dhabi, and any other monied tax-efficient atoll where immense cars are located. Kids, if you need a club to aspire to be part of later on in life, this might be it. As a bit of inspo, check out the pics by Alex Penfold above. 

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  • At one end of the highly scientific Top Gear Car Club Spectrum you have youths meeting in dimly-lit car parks, swapping stickers and putting Burger King trays under their front-wheel-drive cars to drift. At the other, well, you have the above. Probably one of the most exclusive car clubs we’ve ever clapped eyes on.

    It’s called the Supercar Owners Circle, an exclusive fraternity of discerning car collectors that, refreshingly, don’t mind getting their ultra-exclusive cars out of their temperature-controlled humidor garages and take them for a good old thrashing. Specifically around the most picturesque roads nudging the Swiss/Italian border before blasting them down a runway against each other.

    See, no matter how many figures comprise your bank balance, the sense of community surrounding car ownership never changes. It’s just the cars that do. And what a set of cars. To gain access into the fold, you need to know all the secret handshakes and whistles that get you the rarest, limited-production cars in the worlds. Then you need to go ahead and buy them.

    A Ferrari 812 or McLaren 720S wouldn’t even get a look into this bunch; we’re talking Grade A one-offs or cars that were made by the handful. Rarities like a Ferrari Testarossa F.Z.93, Ferrari F12 TRS, Maserati MC12, Aston Vantage GT12 Roadster, Mercedes-Benz CLK GTR, Porsche 911 GT1 Straßenversion and reborn Lightweight Jaguar E-types.

    Since its launch in 2014, the Supercar Owners Circle has grown – now branching out with events springing up in Hong Kong and Abu Dhabi, and any other monied tax-efficient atoll where immense cars are located. Kids, if you need a club to aspire to be part of later on in life, this might be it. As a bit of inspo, check out the pics by Alex Penfold above. 

  • At one end of the highly scientific Top Gear Car Club Spectrum you have youths meeting in dimly-lit car parks, swapping stickers and putting Burger King trays under their front-wheel-drive cars to drift. At the other, well, you have the above. Probably one of the most exclusive car clubs we’ve ever clapped eyes on.

    It’s called the Supercar Owners Circle, an exclusive fraternity of discerning car collectors that, refreshingly, don’t mind getting their ultra-exclusive cars out of their temperature-controlled humidor garages and take them for a good old thrashing. Specifically around the most picturesque roads nudging the Swiss/Italian border before blasting them down a runway against each other.

    See, no matter how many figures comprise your bank balance, the sense of community surrounding car ownership never changes. It’s just the cars that do. And what a set of cars. To gain access into the fold, you need to know all the secret handshakes and whistles that get you the rarest, limited-production cars in the worlds. Then you need to go ahead and buy them.

    A Ferrari 812 or McLaren 720S wouldn’t even get a look into this bunch; we’re talking Grade A one-offs or cars that were made by the handful. Rarities like a Ferrari Testarossa F.Z.93, Ferrari F12 TRS, Maserati MC12, Aston Vantage GT12 Roadster, Mercedes-Benz CLK GTR, Porsche 911 GT1 Straßenversion and reborn Lightweight Jaguar E-types.

    Since its launch in 2014, the Supercar Owners Circle has grown – now branching out with events springing up in Hong Kong and Abu Dhabi, and any other monied tax-efficient atoll where immense cars are located. Kids, if you need a club to aspire to be part of later on in life, this might be it. As a bit of inspo, check out the pics by Alex Penfold above. 

  • At one end of the highly scientific Top Gear Car Club Spectrum you have youths meeting in dimly-lit car parks, swapping stickers and putting Burger King trays under their front-wheel-drive cars to drift. At the other, well, you have the above. Probably one of the most exclusive car clubs we’ve ever clapped eyes on.

    It’s called the Supercar Owners Circle, an exclusive fraternity of discerning car collectors that, refreshingly, don’t mind getting their ultra-exclusive cars out of their temperature-controlled humidor garages and take them for a good old thrashing. Specifically around the most picturesque roads nudging the Swiss/Italian border before blasting them down a runway against each other.

    See, no matter how many figures comprise your bank balance, the sense of community surrounding car ownership never changes. It’s just the cars that do. And what a set of cars. To gain access into the fold, you need to know all the secret handshakes and whistles that get you the rarest, limited-production cars in the worlds. Then you need to go ahead and buy them.

    A Ferrari 812 or McLaren 720S wouldn’t even get a look into this bunch; we’re talking Grade A one-offs or cars that were made by the handful. Rarities like a Ferrari Testarossa F.Z.93, Ferrari F12 TRS, Maserati MC12, Aston Vantage GT12 Roadster, Mercedes-Benz CLK GTR, Porsche 911 GT1 Straßenversion and reborn Lightweight Jaguar E-types.

    Since its launch in 2014, the Supercar Owners Circle has grown – now branching out with events springing up in Hong Kong and Abu Dhabi, and any other monied tax-efficient atoll where immense cars are located. Kids, if you need a club to aspire to be part of later on in life, this might be it. As a bit of inspo, check out the pics by Alex Penfold above. 

  • At one end of the highly scientific Top Gear Car Club Spectrum you have youths meeting in dimly-lit car parks, swapping stickers and putting Burger King trays under their front-wheel-drive cars to drift. At the other, well, you have the above. Probably one of the most exclusive car clubs we’ve ever clapped eyes on.

    It’s called the Supercar Owners Circle, an exclusive fraternity of discerning car collectors that, refreshingly, don’t mind getting their ultra-exclusive cars out of their temperature-controlled humidor garages and take them for a good old thrashing. Specifically around the most picturesque roads nudging the Swiss/Italian border before blasting them down a runway against each other.

    See, no matter how many figures comprise your bank balance, the sense of community surrounding car ownership never changes. It’s just the cars that do. And what a set of cars. To gain access into the fold, you need to know all the secret handshakes and whistles that get you the rarest, limited-production cars in the worlds. Then you need to go ahead and buy them.

    A Ferrari 812 or McLaren 720S wouldn’t even get a look into this bunch; we’re talking Grade A one-offs or cars that were made by the handful. Rarities like a Ferrari Testarossa F.Z.93, Ferrari F12 TRS, Maserati MC12, Aston Vantage GT12 Roadster, Mercedes-Benz CLK GTR, Porsche 911 GT1 Straßenversion and reborn Lightweight Jaguar E-types.

    Since its launch in 2014, the Supercar Owners Circle has grown – now branching out with events springing up in Hong Kong and Abu Dhabi, and any other monied tax-efficient atoll where immense cars are located. Kids, if you need a club to aspire to be part of later on in life, this might be it. As a bit of inspo, check out the pics by Alex Penfold above. 

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  • At one end of the highly scientific Top Gear Car Club Spectrum you have youths meeting in dimly-lit car parks, swapping stickers and putting Burger King trays under their front-wheel-drive cars to drift. At the other, well, you have the above. Probably one of the most exclusive car clubs we’ve ever clapped eyes on.

    It’s called the Supercar Owners Circle, an exclusive fraternity of discerning car collectors that, refreshingly, don’t mind getting their ultra-exclusive cars out of their temperature-controlled humidor garages and take them for a good old thrashing. Specifically around the most picturesque roads nudging the Swiss/Italian border before blasting them down a runway against each other.

    See, no matter how many figures comprise your bank balance, the sense of community surrounding car ownership never changes. It’s just the cars that do. And what a set of cars. To gain access into the fold, you need to know all the secret handshakes and whistles that get you the rarest, limited-production cars in the worlds. Then you need to go ahead and buy them.

    A Ferrari 812 or McLaren 720S wouldn’t even get a look into this bunch; we’re talking Grade A one-offs or cars that were made by the handful. Rarities like a Ferrari Testarossa F.Z.93, Ferrari F12 TRS, Maserati MC12, Aston Vantage GT12 Roadster, Mercedes-Benz CLK GTR, Porsche 911 GT1 Straßenversion and reborn Lightweight Jaguar E-types.

    Since its launch in 2014, the Supercar Owners Circle has grown – now branching out with events springing up in Hong Kong and Abu Dhabi, and any other monied tax-efficient atoll where immense cars are located. Kids, if you need a club to aspire to be part of later on in life, this might be it. As a bit of inspo, check out the pics by Alex Penfold above. 

  • At one end of the highly scientific Top Gear Car Club Spectrum you have youths meeting in dimly-lit car parks, swapping stickers and putting Burger King trays under their front-wheel-drive cars to drift. At the other, well, you have the above. Probably one of the most exclusive car clubs we’ve ever clapped eyes on.

    It’s called the Supercar Owners Circle, an exclusive fraternity of discerning car collectors that, refreshingly, don’t mind getting their ultra-exclusive cars out of their temperature-controlled humidor garages and take them for a good old thrashing. Specifically around the most picturesque roads nudging the Swiss/Italian border before blasting them down a runway against each other.

    See, no matter how many figures comprise your bank balance, the sense of community surrounding car ownership never changes. It’s just the cars that do. And what a set of cars. To gain access into the fold, you need to know all the secret handshakes and whistles that get you the rarest, limited-production cars in the worlds. Then you need to go ahead and buy them.

    A Ferrari 812 or McLaren 720S wouldn’t even get a look into this bunch; we’re talking Grade A one-offs or cars that were made by the handful. Rarities like a Ferrari Testarossa F.Z.93, Ferrari F12 TRS, Maserati MC12, Aston Vantage GT12 Roadster, Mercedes-Benz CLK GTR, Porsche 911 GT1 Straßenversion and reborn Lightweight Jaguar E-types.

    Since its launch in 2014, the Supercar Owners Circle has grown – now branching out with events springing up in Hong Kong and Abu Dhabi, and any other monied tax-efficient atoll where immense cars are located. Kids, if you need a club to aspire to be part of later on in life, this might be it. As a bit of inspo, check out the pics by Alex Penfold above. 

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  • At one end of the highly scientific Top Gear Car Club Spectrum you have youths meeting in dimly-lit car parks, swapping stickers and putting Burger King trays under their front-wheel-drive cars to drift. At the other, well, you have the above. Probably one of the most exclusive car clubs we’ve ever clapped eyes on.

    It’s called the Supercar Owners Circle, an exclusive fraternity of discerning car collectors that, refreshingly, don’t mind getting their ultra-exclusive cars out of their temperature-controlled humidor garages and take them for a good old thrashing. Specifically around the most picturesque roads nudging the Swiss/Italian border before blasting them down a runway against each other.

    See, no matter how many figures comprise your bank balance, the sense of community surrounding car ownership never changes. It’s just the cars that do. And what a set of cars. To gain access into the fold, you need to know all the secret handshakes and whistles that get you the rarest, limited-production cars in the worlds. Then you need to go ahead and buy them.

    A Ferrari 812 or McLaren 720S wouldn’t even get a look into this bunch; we’re talking Grade A one-offs or cars that were made by the handful. Rarities like a Ferrari Testarossa F.Z.93, Ferrari F12 TRS, Maserati MC12, Aston Vantage GT12 Roadster, Mercedes-Benz CLK GTR, Porsche 911 GT1 Straßenversion and reborn Lightweight Jaguar E-types.

    Since its launch in 2014, the Supercar Owners Circle has grown – now branching out with events springing up in Hong Kong and Abu Dhabi, and any other monied tax-efficient atoll where immense cars are located. Kids, if you need a club to aspire to be part of later on in life, this might be it. As a bit of inspo, check out the pics by Alex Penfold above. 

  • At one end of the highly scientific Top Gear Car Club Spectrum you have youths meeting in dimly-lit car parks, swapping stickers and putting Burger King trays under their front-wheel-drive cars to drift. At the other, well, you have the above. Probably one of the most exclusive car clubs we’ve ever clapped eyes on.

    It’s called the Supercar Owners Circle, an exclusive fraternity of discerning car collectors that, refreshingly, don’t mind getting their ultra-exclusive cars out of their temperature-controlled humidor garages and take them for a good old thrashing. Specifically around the most picturesque roads nudging the Swiss/Italian border before blasting them down a runway against each other.

    See, no matter how many figures comprise your bank balance, the sense of community surrounding car ownership never changes. It’s just the cars that do. And what a set of cars. To gain access into the fold, you need to know all the secret handshakes and whistles that get you the rarest, limited-production cars in the worlds. Then you need to go ahead and buy them.

    A Ferrari 812 or McLaren 720S wouldn’t even get a look into this bunch; we’re talking Grade A one-offs or cars that were made by the handful. Rarities like a Ferrari Testarossa F.Z.93, Ferrari F12 TRS, Maserati MC12, Aston Vantage GT12 Roadster, Mercedes-Benz CLK GTR, Porsche 911 GT1 Straßenversion and reborn Lightweight Jaguar E-types.

    Since its launch in 2014, the Supercar Owners Circle has grown – now branching out with events springing up in Hong Kong and Abu Dhabi, and any other monied tax-efficient atoll where immense cars are located. Kids, if you need a club to aspire to be part of later on in life, this might be it. As a bit of inspo, check out the pics by Alex Penfold above. 

  • At one end of the highly scientific Top Gear Car Club Spectrum you have youths meeting in dimly-lit car parks, swapping stickers and putting Burger King trays under their front-wheel-drive cars to drift. At the other, well, you have the above. Probably one of the most exclusive car clubs we’ve ever clapped eyes on.

    It’s called the Supercar Owners Circle, an exclusive fraternity of discerning car collectors that, refreshingly, don’t mind getting their ultra-exclusive cars out of their temperature-controlled humidor garages and take them for a good old thrashing. Specifically around the most picturesque roads nudging the Swiss/Italian border before blasting them down a runway against each other.

    See, no matter how many figures comprise your bank balance, the sense of community surrounding car ownership never changes. It’s just the cars that do. And what a set of cars. To gain access into the fold, you need to know all the secret handshakes and whistles that get you the rarest, limited-production cars in the worlds. Then you need to go ahead and buy them.

    A Ferrari 812 or McLaren 720S wouldn’t even get a look into this bunch; we’re talking Grade A one-offs or cars that were made by the handful. Rarities like a Ferrari Testarossa F.Z.93, Ferrari F12 TRS, Maserati MC12, Aston Vantage GT12 Roadster, Mercedes-Benz CLK GTR, Porsche 911 GT1 Straßenversion and reborn Lightweight Jaguar E-types.

    Since its launch in 2014, the Supercar Owners Circle has grown – now branching out with events springing up in Hong Kong and Abu Dhabi, and any other monied tax-efficient atoll where immense cars are located. Kids, if you need a club to aspire to be part of later on in life, this might be it. As a bit of inspo, check out the pics by Alex Penfold above. 

  • At one end of the highly scientific Top Gear Car Club Spectrum you have youths meeting in dimly-lit car parks, swapping stickers and putting Burger King trays under their front-wheel-drive cars to drift. At the other, well, you have the above. Probably one of the most exclusive car clubs we’ve ever clapped eyes on.

    It’s called the Supercar Owners Circle, an exclusive fraternity of discerning car collectors that, refreshingly, don’t mind getting their ultra-exclusive cars out of their temperature-controlled humidor garages and take them for a good old thrashing. Specifically around the most picturesque roads nudging the Swiss/Italian border before blasting them down a runway against each other.

    See, no matter how many figures comprise your bank balance, the sense of community surrounding car ownership never changes. It’s just the cars that do. And what a set of cars. To gain access into the fold, you need to know all the secret handshakes and whistles that get you the rarest, limited-production cars in the worlds. Then you need to go ahead and buy them.

    A Ferrari 812 or McLaren 720S wouldn’t even get a look into this bunch; we’re talking Grade A one-offs or cars that were made by the handful. Rarities like a Ferrari Testarossa F.Z.93, Ferrari F12 TRS, Maserati MC12, Aston Vantage GT12 Roadster, Mercedes-Benz CLK GTR, Porsche 911 GT1 Straßenversion and reborn Lightweight Jaguar E-types.

    Since its launch in 2014, the Supercar Owners Circle has grown – now branching out with events springing up in Hong Kong and Abu Dhabi, and any other monied tax-efficient atoll where immense cars are located. Kids, if you need a club to aspire to be part of later on in life, this might be it. As a bit of inspo, check out the pics by Alex Penfold above. 

  • At one end of the highly scientific Top Gear Car Club Spectrum you have youths meeting in dimly-lit car parks, swapping stickers and putting Burger King trays under their front-wheel-drive cars to drift. At the other, well, you have the above. Probably one of the most exclusive car clubs we’ve ever clapped eyes on.

    It’s called the Supercar Owners Circle, an exclusive fraternity of discerning car collectors that, refreshingly, don’t mind getting their ultra-exclusive cars out of their temperature-controlled humidor garages and take them for a good old thrashing. Specifically around the most picturesque roads nudging the Swiss/Italian border before blasting them down a runway against each other.

    See, no matter how many figures comprise your bank balance, the sense of community surrounding car ownership never changes. It’s just the cars that do. And what a set of cars. To gain access into the fold, you need to know all the secret handshakes and whistles that get you the rarest, limited-production cars in the worlds. Then you need to go ahead and buy them.

    A Ferrari 812 or McLaren 720S wouldn’t even get a look into this bunch; we’re talking Grade A one-offs or cars that were made by the handful. Rarities like a Ferrari Testarossa F.Z.93, Ferrari F12 TRS, Maserati MC12, Aston Vantage GT12 Roadster, Mercedes-Benz CLK GTR, Porsche 911 GT1 Straßenversion and reborn Lightweight Jaguar E-types.

    Since its launch in 2014, the Supercar Owners Circle has grown – now branching out with events springing up in Hong Kong and Abu Dhabi, and any other monied tax-efficient atoll where immense cars are located. Kids, if you need a club to aspire to be part of later on in life, this might be it. As a bit of inspo, check out the pics by Alex Penfold above. 

  • At one end of the highly scientific Top Gear Car Club Spectrum you have youths meeting in dimly-lit car parks, swapping stickers and putting Burger King trays under their front-wheel-drive cars to drift. At the other, well, you have the above. Probably one of the most exclusive car clubs we’ve ever clapped eyes on.

    It’s called the Supercar Owners Circle, an exclusive fraternity of discerning car collectors that, refreshingly, don’t mind getting their ultra-exclusive cars out of their temperature-controlled humidor garages and take them for a good old thrashing. Specifically around the most picturesque roads nudging the Swiss/Italian border before blasting them down a runway against each other.

    See, no matter how many figures comprise your bank balance, the sense of community surrounding car ownership never changes. It’s just the cars that do. And what a set of cars. To gain access into the fold, you need to know all the secret handshakes and whistles that get you the rarest, limited-production cars in the worlds. Then you need to go ahead and buy them.

    A Ferrari 812 or McLaren 720S wouldn’t even get a look into this bunch; we’re talking Grade A one-offs or cars that were made by the handful. Rarities like a Ferrari Testarossa F.Z.93, Ferrari F12 TRS, Maserati MC12, Aston Vantage GT12 Roadster, Mercedes-Benz CLK GTR, Porsche 911 GT1 Straßenversion and reborn Lightweight Jaguar E-types.

    Since its launch in 2014, the Supercar Owners Circle has grown – now branching out with events springing up in Hong Kong and Abu Dhabi, and any other monied tax-efficient atoll where immense cars are located. Kids, if you need a club to aspire to be part of later on in life, this might be it. As a bit of inspo, check out the pics by Alex Penfold above. 

  • At one end of the highly scientific Top Gear Car Club Spectrum you have youths meeting in dimly-lit car parks, swapping stickers and putting Burger King trays under their front-wheel-drive cars to drift. At the other, well, you have the above. Probably one of the most exclusive car clubs we’ve ever clapped eyes on.

    It’s called the Supercar Owners Circle, an exclusive fraternity of discerning car collectors that, refreshingly, don’t mind getting their ultra-exclusive cars out of their temperature-controlled humidor garages and take them for a good old thrashing. Specifically around the most picturesque roads nudging the Swiss/Italian border before blasting them down a runway against each other.

    See, no matter how many figures comprise your bank balance, the sense of community surrounding car ownership never changes. It’s just the cars that do. And what a set of cars. To gain access into the fold, you need to know all the secret handshakes and whistles that get you the rarest, limited-production cars in the worlds. Then you need to go ahead and buy them.

    A Ferrari 812 or McLaren 720S wouldn’t even get a look into this bunch; we’re talking Grade A one-offs or cars that were made by the handful. Rarities like a Ferrari Testarossa F.Z.93, Ferrari F12 TRS, Maserati MC12, Aston Vantage GT12 Roadster, Mercedes-Benz CLK GTR, Porsche 911 GT1 Straßenversion and reborn Lightweight Jaguar E-types.

    Since its launch in 2014, the Supercar Owners Circle has grown – now branching out with events springing up in Hong Kong and Abu Dhabi, and any other monied tax-efficient atoll where immense cars are located. Kids, if you need a club to aspire to be part of later on in life, this might be it. As a bit of inspo, check out the pics by Alex Penfold above. 

  • At one end of the highly scientific Top Gear Car Club Spectrum you have youths meeting in dimly-lit car parks, swapping stickers and putting Burger King trays under their front-wheel-drive cars to drift. At the other, well, you have the above. Probably one of the most exclusive car clubs we’ve ever clapped eyes on.

    It’s called the Supercar Owners Circle, an exclusive fraternity of discerning car collectors that, refreshingly, don’t mind getting their ultra-exclusive cars out of their temperature-controlled humidor garages and take them for a good old thrashing. Specifically around the most picturesque roads nudging the Swiss/Italian border before blasting them down a runway against each other.

    See, no matter how many figures comprise your bank balance, the sense of community surrounding car ownership never changes. It’s just the cars that do. And what a set of cars. To gain access into the fold, you need to know all the secret handshakes and whistles that get you the rarest, limited-production cars in the worlds. Then you need to go ahead and buy them.

    A Ferrari 812 or McLaren 720S wouldn’t even get a look into this bunch; we’re talking Grade A one-offs or cars that were made by the handful. Rarities like a Ferrari Testarossa F.Z.93, Ferrari F12 TRS, Maserati MC12, Aston Vantage GT12 Roadster, Mercedes-Benz CLK GTR, Porsche 911 GT1 Straßenversion and reborn Lightweight Jaguar E-types.

    Since its launch in 2014, the Supercar Owners Circle has grown – now branching out with events springing up in Hong Kong and Abu Dhabi, and any other monied tax-efficient atoll where immense cars are located. Kids, if you need a club to aspire to be part of later on in life, this might be it. As a bit of inspo, check out the pics by Alex Penfold above. 

  • At one end of the highly scientific Top Gear Car Club Spectrum you have youths meeting in dimly-lit car parks, swapping stickers and putting Burger King trays under their front-wheel-drive cars to drift. At the other, well, you have the above. Probably one of the most exclusive car clubs we’ve ever clapped eyes on.

    It’s called the Supercar Owners Circle, an exclusive fraternity of discerning car collectors that, refreshingly, don’t mind getting their ultra-exclusive cars out of their temperature-controlled humidor garages and take them for a good old thrashing. Specifically around the most picturesque roads nudging the Swiss/Italian border before blasting them down a runway against each other.

    See, no matter how many figures comprise your bank balance, the sense of community surrounding car ownership never changes. It’s just the cars that do. And what a set of cars. To gain access into the fold, you need to know all the secret handshakes and whistles that get you the rarest, limited-production cars in the worlds. Then you need to go ahead and buy them.

    A Ferrari 812 or McLaren 720S wouldn’t even get a look into this bunch; we’re talking Grade A one-offs or cars that were made by the handful. Rarities like a Ferrari Testarossa F.Z.93, Ferrari F12 TRS, Maserati MC12, Aston Vantage GT12 Roadster, Mercedes-Benz CLK GTR, Porsche 911 GT1 Straßenversion and reborn Lightweight Jaguar E-types.

    Since its launch in 2014, the Supercar Owners Circle has grown – now branching out with events springing up in Hong Kong and Abu Dhabi, and any other monied tax-efficient atoll where immense cars are located. Kids, if you need a club to aspire to be part of later on in life, this might be it. As a bit of inspo, check out the pics by Alex Penfold above. 

  • At one end of the highly scientific Top Gear Car Club Spectrum you have youths meeting in dimly-lit car parks, swapping stickers and putting Burger King trays under their front-wheel-drive cars to drift. At the other, well, you have the above. Probably one of the most exclusive car clubs we’ve ever clapped eyes on.

    It’s called the Supercar Owners Circle, an exclusive fraternity of discerning car collectors that, refreshingly, don’t mind getting their ultra-exclusive cars out of their temperature-controlled humidor garages and take them for a good old thrashing. Specifically around the most picturesque roads nudging the Swiss/Italian border before blasting them down a runway against each other.

    See, no matter how many figures comprise your bank balance, the sense of community surrounding car ownership never changes. It’s just the cars that do. And what a set of cars. To gain access into the fold, you need to know all the secret handshakes and whistles that get you the rarest, limited-production cars in the worlds. Then you need to go ahead and buy them.

    A Ferrari 812 or McLaren 720S wouldn’t even get a look into this bunch; we’re talking Grade A one-offs or cars that were made by the handful. Rarities like a Ferrari Testarossa F.Z.93, Ferrari F12 TRS, Maserati MC12, Aston Vantage GT12 Roadster, Mercedes-Benz CLK GTR, Porsche 911 GT1 Straßenversion and reborn Lightweight Jaguar E-types.

    Since its launch in 2014, the Supercar Owners Circle has grown – now branching out with events springing up in Hong Kong and Abu Dhabi, and any other monied tax-efficient atoll where immense cars are located. Kids, if you need a club to aspire to be part of later on in life, this might be it. As a bit of inspo, check out the pics by Alex Penfold above. 

  • At one end of the highly scientific Top Gear Car Club Spectrum you have youths meeting in dimly-lit car parks, swapping stickers and putting Burger King trays under their front-wheel-drive cars to drift. At the other, well, you have the above. Probably one of the most exclusive car clubs we’ve ever clapped eyes on.

    It’s called the Supercar Owners Circle, an exclusive fraternity of discerning car collectors that, refreshingly, don’t mind getting their ultra-exclusive cars out of their temperature-controlled humidor garages and take them for a good old thrashing. Specifically around the most picturesque roads nudging the Swiss/Italian border before blasting them down a runway against each other.

    See, no matter how many figures comprise your bank balance, the sense of community surrounding car ownership never changes. It’s just the cars that do. And what a set of cars. To gain access into the fold, you need to know all the secret handshakes and whistles that get you the rarest, limited-production cars in the worlds. Then you need to go ahead and buy them.

    A Ferrari 812 or McLaren 720S wouldn’t even get a look into this bunch; we’re talking Grade A one-offs or cars that were made by the handful. Rarities like a Ferrari Testarossa F.Z.93, Ferrari F12 TRS, Maserati MC12, Aston Vantage GT12 Roadster, Mercedes-Benz CLK GTR, Porsche 911 GT1 Straßenversion and reborn Lightweight Jaguar E-types.

    Since its launch in 2014, the Supercar Owners Circle has grown – now branching out with events springing up in Hong Kong and Abu Dhabi, and any other monied tax-efficient atoll where immense cars are located. Kids, if you need a club to aspire to be part of later on in life, this might be it. As a bit of inspo, check out the pics by Alex Penfold above. 

  • At one end of the highly scientific Top Gear Car Club Spectrum you have youths meeting in dimly-lit car parks, swapping stickers and putting Burger King trays under their front-wheel-drive cars to drift. At the other, well, you have the above. Probably one of the most exclusive car clubs we’ve ever clapped eyes on.

    It’s called the Supercar Owners Circle, an exclusive fraternity of discerning car collectors that, refreshingly, don’t mind getting their ultra-exclusive cars out of their temperature-controlled humidor garages and take them for a good old thrashing. Specifically around the most picturesque roads nudging the Swiss/Italian border before blasting them down a runway against each other.

    See, no matter how many figures comprise your bank balance, the sense of community surrounding car ownership never changes. It’s just the cars that do. And what a set of cars. To gain access into the fold, you need to know all the secret handshakes and whistles that get you the rarest, limited-production cars in the worlds. Then you need to go ahead and buy them.

    A Ferrari 812 or McLaren 720S wouldn’t even get a look into this bunch; we’re talking Grade A one-offs or cars that were made by the handful. Rarities like a Ferrari Testarossa F.Z.93, Ferrari F12 TRS, Maserati MC12, Aston Vantage GT12 Roadster, Mercedes-Benz CLK GTR, Porsche 911 GT1 Straßenversion and reborn Lightweight Jaguar E-types.

    Since its launch in 2014, the Supercar Owners Circle has grown – now branching out with events springing up in Hong Kong and Abu Dhabi, and any other monied tax-efficient atoll where immense cars are located. Kids, if you need a club to aspire to be part of later on in life, this might be it. As a bit of inspo, check out the pics by Alex Penfold above. 

  • At one end of the highly scientific Top Gear Car Club Spectrum you have youths meeting in dimly-lit car parks, swapping stickers and putting Burger King trays under their front-wheel-drive cars to drift. At the other, well, you have the above. Probably one of the most exclusive car clubs we’ve ever clapped eyes on.

    It’s called the Supercar Owners Circle, an exclusive fraternity of discerning car collectors that, refreshingly, don’t mind getting their ultra-exclusive cars out of their temperature-controlled humidor garages and take them for a good old thrashing. Specifically around the most picturesque roads nudging the Swiss/Italian border before blasting them down a runway against each other.

    See, no matter how many figures comprise your bank balance, the sense of community surrounding car ownership never changes. It’s just the cars that do. And what a set of cars. To gain access into the fold, you need to know all the secret handshakes and whistles that get you the rarest, limited-production cars in the worlds. Then you need to go ahead and buy them.

    A Ferrari 812 or McLaren 720S wouldn’t even get a look into this bunch; we’re talking Grade A one-offs or cars that were made by the handful. Rarities like a Ferrari Testarossa F.Z.93, Ferrari F12 TRS, Maserati MC12, Aston Vantage GT12 Roadster, Mercedes-Benz CLK GTR, Porsche 911 GT1 Straßenversion and reborn Lightweight Jaguar E-types.

    Since its launch in 2014, the Supercar Owners Circle has grown – now branching out with events springing up in Hong Kong and Abu Dhabi, and any other monied tax-efficient atoll where immense cars are located. Kids, if you need a club to aspire to be part of later on in life, this might be it. As a bit of inspo, check out the pics by Alex Penfold above. 

  • At one end of the highly scientific Top Gear Car Club Spectrum you have youths meeting in dimly-lit car parks, swapping stickers and putting Burger King trays under their front-wheel-drive cars to drift. At the other, well, you have the above. Probably one of the most exclusive car clubs we’ve ever clapped eyes on.

    It’s called the Supercar Owners Circle, an exclusive fraternity of discerning car collectors that, refreshingly, don’t mind getting their ultra-exclusive cars out of their temperature-controlled humidor garages and take them for a good old thrashing. Specifically around the most picturesque roads nudging the Swiss/Italian border before blasting them down a runway against each other.

    See, no matter how many figures comprise your bank balance, the sense of community surrounding car ownership never changes. It’s just the cars that do. And what a set of cars. To gain access into the fold, you need to know all the secret handshakes and whistles that get you the rarest, limited-production cars in the worlds. Then you need to go ahead and buy them.

    A Ferrari 812 or McLaren 720S wouldn’t even get a look into this bunch; we’re talking Grade A one-offs or cars that were made by the handful. Rarities like a Ferrari Testarossa F.Z.93, Ferrari F12 TRS, Maserati MC12, Aston Vantage GT12 Roadster, Mercedes-Benz CLK GTR, Porsche 911 GT1 Straßenversion and reborn Lightweight Jaguar E-types.

    Since its launch in 2014, the Supercar Owners Circle has grown – now branching out with events springing up in Hong Kong and Abu Dhabi, and any other monied tax-efficient atoll where immense cars are located. Kids, if you need a club to aspire to be part of later on in life, this might be it. As a bit of inspo, check out the pics by Alex Penfold above. 

  • At one end of the highly scientific Top Gear Car Club Spectrum you have youths meeting in dimly-lit car parks, swapping stickers and putting Burger King trays under their front-wheel-drive cars to drift. At the other, well, you have the above. Probably one of the most exclusive car clubs we’ve ever clapped eyes on.

    It’s called the Supercar Owners Circle, an exclusive fraternity of discerning car collectors that, refreshingly, don’t mind getting their ultra-exclusive cars out of their temperature-controlled humidor garages and take them for a good old thrashing. Specifically around the most picturesque roads nudging the Swiss/Italian border before blasting them down a runway against each other.

    See, no matter how many figures comprise your bank balance, the sense of community surrounding car ownership never changes. It’s just the cars that do. And what a set of cars. To gain access into the fold, you need to know all the secret handshakes and whistles that get you the rarest, limited-production cars in the worlds. Then you need to go ahead and buy them.

    A Ferrari 812 or McLaren 720S wouldn’t even get a look into this bunch; we’re talking Grade A one-offs or cars that were made by the handful. Rarities like a Ferrari Testarossa F.Z.93, Ferrari F12 TRS, Maserati MC12, Aston Vantage GT12 Roadster, Mercedes-Benz CLK GTR, Porsche 911 GT1 Straßenversion and reborn Lightweight Jaguar E-types.

    Since its launch in 2014, the Supercar Owners Circle has grown – now branching out with events springing up in Hong Kong and Abu Dhabi, and any other monied tax-efficient atoll where immense cars are located. Kids, if you need a club to aspire to be part of later on in life, this might be it. As a bit of inspo, check out the pics by Alex Penfold above. 

  • At one end of the highly scientific Top Gear Car Club Spectrum you have youths meeting in dimly-lit car parks, swapping stickers and putting Burger King trays under their front-wheel-drive cars to drift. At the other, well, you have the above. Probably one of the most exclusive car clubs we’ve ever clapped eyes on.

    It’s called the Supercar Owners Circle, an exclusive fraternity of discerning car collectors that, refreshingly, don’t mind getting their ultra-exclusive cars out of their temperature-controlled humidor garages and take them for a good old thrashing. Specifically around the most picturesque roads nudging the Swiss/Italian border before blasting them down a runway against each other.

    See, no matter how many figures comprise your bank balance, the sense of community surrounding car ownership never changes. It’s just the cars that do. And what a set of cars. To gain access into the fold, you need to know all the secret handshakes and whistles that get you the rarest, limited-production cars in the worlds. Then you need to go ahead and buy them.

    A Ferrari 812 or McLaren 720S wouldn’t even get a look into this bunch; we’re talking Grade A one-offs or cars that were made by the handful. Rarities like a Ferrari Testarossa F.Z.93, Ferrari F12 TRS, Maserati MC12, Aston Vantage GT12 Roadster, Mercedes-Benz CLK GTR, Porsche 911 GT1 Straßenversion and reborn Lightweight Jaguar E-types.

    Since its launch in 2014, the Supercar Owners Circle has grown – now branching out with events springing up in Hong Kong and Abu Dhabi, and any other monied tax-efficient atoll where immense cars are located. Kids, if you need a club to aspire to be part of later on in life, this might be it. As a bit of inspo, check out the pics by Alex Penfold above. 

  • At one end of the highly scientific Top Gear Car Club Spectrum you have youths meeting in dimly-lit car parks, swapping stickers and putting Burger King trays under their front-wheel-drive cars to drift. At the other, well, you have the above. Probably one of the most exclusive car clubs we’ve ever clapped eyes on.

    It’s called the Supercar Owners Circle, an exclusive fraternity of discerning car collectors that, refreshingly, don’t mind getting their ultra-exclusive cars out of their temperature-controlled humidor garages and take them for a good old thrashing. Specifically around the most picturesque roads nudging the Swiss/Italian border before blasting them down a runway against each other.

    See, no matter how many figures comprise your bank balance, the sense of community surrounding car ownership never changes. It’s just the cars that do. And what a set of cars. To gain access into the fold, you need to know all the secret handshakes and whistles that get you the rarest, limited-production cars in the worlds. Then you need to go ahead and buy them.

    A Ferrari 812 or McLaren 720S wouldn’t even get a look into this bunch; we’re talking Grade A one-offs or cars that were made by the handful. Rarities like a Ferrari Testarossa F.Z.93, Ferrari F12 TRS, Maserati MC12, Aston Vantage GT12 Roadster, Mercedes-Benz CLK GTR, Porsche 911 GT1 Straßenversion and reborn Lightweight Jaguar E-types.

    Since its launch in 2014, the Supercar Owners Circle has grown – now branching out with events springing up in Hong Kong and Abu Dhabi, and any other monied tax-efficient atoll where immense cars are located. Kids, if you need a club to aspire to be part of later on in life, this might be it. As a bit of inspo, check out the pics by Alex Penfold above. 

  • At one end of the highly scientific Top Gear Car Club Spectrum you have youths meeting in dimly-lit car parks, swapping stickers and putting Burger King trays under their front-wheel-drive cars to drift. At the other, well, you have the above. Probably one of the most exclusive car clubs we’ve ever clapped eyes on.

    It’s called the Supercar Owners Circle, an exclusive fraternity of discerning car collectors that, refreshingly, don’t mind getting their ultra-exclusive cars out of their temperature-controlled humidor garages and take them for a good old thrashing. Specifically around the most picturesque roads nudging the Swiss/Italian border before blasting them down a runway against each other.

    See, no matter how many figures comprise your bank balance, the sense of community surrounding car ownership never changes. It’s just the cars that do. And what a set of cars. To gain access into the fold, you need to know all the secret handshakes and whistles that get you the rarest, limited-production cars in the worlds. Then you need to go ahead and buy them.

    A Ferrari 812 or McLaren 720S wouldn’t even get a look into this bunch; we’re talking Grade A one-offs or cars that were made by the handful. Rarities like a Ferrari Testarossa F.Z.93, Ferrari F12 TRS, Maserati MC12, Aston Vantage GT12 Roadster, Mercedes-Benz CLK GTR, Porsche 911 GT1 Straßenversion and reborn Lightweight Jaguar E-types.

    Since its launch in 2014, the Supercar Owners Circle has grown – now branching out with events springing up in Hong Kong and Abu Dhabi, and any other monied tax-efficient atoll where immense cars are located. Kids, if you need a club to aspire to be part of later on in life, this might be it. As a bit of inspo, check out the pics by Alex Penfold above. 

  • At one end of the highly scientific Top Gear Car Club Spectrum you have youths meeting in dimly-lit car parks, swapping stickers and putting Burger King trays under their front-wheel-drive cars to drift. At the other, well, you have the above. Probably one of the most exclusive car clubs we’ve ever clapped eyes on.

    It’s called the Supercar Owners Circle, an exclusive fraternity of discerning car collectors that, refreshingly, don’t mind getting their ultra-exclusive cars out of their temperature-controlled humidor garages and take them for a good old thrashing. Specifically around the most picturesque roads nudging the Swiss/Italian border before blasting them down a runway against each other.

    See, no matter how many figures comprise your bank balance, the sense of community surrounding car ownership never changes. It’s just the cars that do. And what a set of cars. To gain access into the fold, you need to know all the secret handshakes and whistles that get you the rarest, limited-production cars in the worlds. Then you need to go ahead and buy them.

    A Ferrari 812 or McLaren 720S wouldn’t even get a look into this bunch; we’re talking Grade A one-offs or cars that were made by the handful. Rarities like a Ferrari Testarossa F.Z.93, Ferrari F12 TRS, Maserati MC12, Aston Vantage GT12 Roadster, Mercedes-Benz CLK GTR, Porsche 911 GT1 Straßenversion and reborn Lightweight Jaguar E-types.

    Since its launch in 2014, the Supercar Owners Circle has grown – now branching out with events springing up in Hong Kong and Abu Dhabi, and any other monied tax-efficient atoll where immense cars are located. Kids, if you need a club to aspire to be part of later on in life, this might be it. As a bit of inspo, check out the pics by Alex Penfold above. 

  • At one end of the highly scientific Top Gear Car Club Spectrum you have youths meeting in dimly-lit car parks, swapping stickers and putting Burger King trays under their front-wheel-drive cars to drift. At the other, well, you have the above. Probably one of the most exclusive car clubs we’ve ever clapped eyes on.

    It’s called the Supercar Owners Circle, an exclusive fraternity of discerning car collectors that, refreshingly, don’t mind getting their ultra-exclusive cars out of their temperature-controlled humidor garages and take them for a good old thrashing. Specifically around the most picturesque roads nudging the Swiss/Italian border before blasting them down a runway against each other.

    See, no matter how many figures comprise your bank balance, the sense of community surrounding car ownership never changes. It’s just the cars that do. And what a set of cars. To gain access into the fold, you need to know all the secret handshakes and whistles that get you the rarest, limited-production cars in the worlds. Then you need to go ahead and buy them.

    A Ferrari 812 or McLaren 720S wouldn’t even get a look into this bunch; we’re talking Grade A one-offs or cars that were made by the handful. Rarities like a Ferrari Testarossa F.Z.93, Ferrari F12 TRS, Maserati MC12, Aston Vantage GT12 Roadster, Mercedes-Benz CLK GTR, Porsche 911 GT1 Straßenversion and reborn Lightweight Jaguar E-types.

    Since its launch in 2014, the Supercar Owners Circle has grown – now branching out with events springing up in Hong Kong and Abu Dhabi, and any other monied tax-efficient atoll where immense cars are located. Kids, if you need a club to aspire to be part of later on in life, this might be it. As a bit of inspo, check out the pics by Alex Penfold above. 

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