Buy Ford Mustang Mach-E Price, PPC or HP | Top Gear
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Saturday 3rd December
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Buying

What should I be paying?

A reminder of the different versions, then. The most affordable model is the single-motor Mach-E in 'Select' trim: £50,830. Upgrading to the single-motor Extended Range will mean you need 'Premium' trim and £59,380 in your back pocket. Then we have the dual-motor, all-wheel drive iteration with its big battery, Premium trim and £65,405 price tag. Ouch. Top of the tree is the GT, available only in Extended Range, AWD form, which will set you back £74,540 before options. 

On a four-year agreement with a £5,000 deposit and 9,000 mile-per-year limit, finance prices sit at a hefty £743 a month for the base version. Ouch. The AWD, big battery model on the same deal would start at around £840 per month. A lot of money, which means it’s hard to overlook the fact that the entry-level car looks the more tempting – especially as it’s not a lot slower and should also cost you a little less electricity, too.

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On the subject of efficiency, we have been generally impressed with the Mach-E. In cold, wet winter weather it returned 3.0mi/kWh of electricity overall, giving the AWD Extended Range version a real-world range (on the 88kWh of available battery charge) of 260 miles, against a claimed 335 miles. 

On a warm summer’s day, on a return journey from London to Peterborough, the RWD Standard Range managed an increased 4.0 mi/kWh, giving a real-world range of 240 miles, against a claimed 273 miles. Enough to get you there and back, with plenty of miles to spare, in other words. Another reason to buy this model, or better yet, the RWD Extended Range version, if you’re really range anxious.

Ford is part of the Ionity network, so the Mach-E claims to be able to take 57 miles of charge on board in 10 minutes at a 150kW fast charger. Or do 10-80 per cent in 38 minutes. In practice you’re more likely to be charging at home, where even with a wallbox you’ll need a full 12 hours to recharge from empty. But as we’ve always said, the problem for electric cars isn’t range anxiety, but infrastructure anxiety.

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