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Car Review

MG Motor UK Cyberster review

£54,916 - £59,916
810
Published: 28 Jun 2024
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Driving

What is it like to drive?

This is a sports car like no other. That much is clear in our first few miles as we follow a Honda S2000 through the Scottish Highlands, the sound of its brash Mugen exhaust punctuated by frequent gearchanges. The Cyberster trickles along behind, its throttle pedal barely even halfway, its subtle augmented soundtrack drowned out by the din in front. After a while the Honda pulls over and its driver beckons us in for a closer look; he, like a lot of car enthusiasts, is floored by the styling and wants this new-age MG to be good. To show that an electrified future could be rather good fun.

And, for the most part, it is. It’s no hardcore sports car, instead channelling the spirit of the BMW Z4 and Jaguar F-Type that its dimensions and proportions so closely mimic (this is a bigger car than pictures suggest, and a wide thing to squeeze down tight country lanes).

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Its platform is modified from the MG4 electric hatch and its various components are wisely bought in from the likes of Bosch and Brembo to get the car dynamics up to scratch. But this is a heavy car, whichever version you choose: 1,885kg for the RWD Trophy, another 100 kilos exactly for the AWD GT.

Crucially MG hasn’t mercilessly fought the weight via torque vectoring or four-wheel steer to wrestle the car through corners; a Boxster will outhandle it, but the Cyberster’s smoother, calmer approach is commendable. The ride is comfy and Britain’s increasingly rutted and potholed roads won’t faze it. In that regard, it’s a breath of fresh air. Convertibles are few and far between on the market these days: here’s one that encourages you to really bask in the experience rather than rush white-knuckled to your destination.

Indeed, push it harder and its more languid approach comes undone, the damping increasingly unsettled with commitment. But a calm and precise driving style reveals a smart handling balance, particularly in the Trophy, with its neater, lighter front end and a rear axle that’ll just about forgo the ESP and get involved in the process. Hoof the throttle mid corner in the dual-motor GT and it just propels you out the other side without fuss. Fun, but hardly the last word in involvement.

Is it fast?

The Trophy is more than brisk enough and its 5.0s 0-62mph time feels a touch modest. The five grand leap to the GT is good value if you crave the dramatic punch that performance EVs have become known for. Just be warned that it doesn’t particularly stand out from the crowd; one circa-3.0s launch control feels like another in the world of electric cars, with or without a roof. What the Cyberster GT offers is a foolproof nature to its performance, the ability to deploy its power in a sledgehammer hit in the feistier drive modes.

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There’s no denying it has wow factor: it just might have a shelf life, especially as and when quicker EV roadsters appear on the market. The Trophy is the handling nerd’s car, making the best of the Cyberster’s steering setup with its more linear power delivery and more nuanced reactions in corners.

How many miles does it do in the real world?

Well, three and a half hours of driving through incredible Scottish Highland roads in the dual-motor GT saw us achieve about 2.2 miles/kWh for a range figure of roughly 150 miles; down significantly on the 276-mile claim, but it was hardly ‘combined’ use. A mite over 200 miles should be achievable day-to-day.

Bugbears? Its various active safety systems can be a little nannying. Its belligerent awareness alert, which chastises distracted drivers, barely lets you look away from the road for a second. You’ll be bonged at incessantly during a quick glance at the nav screen or climate controls, though it’s quiet enough that you’ll eventually learn to ignore it. The collision detection system, meanwhile, can occasionally shrill a more startling chime as you enthusiastically carry speed into corners. An odd flex for a car with such punchy performance and strong grip.

Highlights from the range

the fastest

375kW GT Dual Motor 77 kWh 2dr AWD Auto
  • 0-623.2s
  • CO20
  • BHP502.9
  • MPG
  • Price£59,916

the cheapest

250kW Trophy Single Motor 77 kWh 2dr Auto
  • 0-625s
  • CO20
  • BHP335.3
  • MPG
  • Price£54,915.996

the greenest

375kW GT Dual Motor 77 kWh 2dr AWD Auto
  • 0-623.2s
  • CO20
  • BHP502.9
  • MPG
  • Price£59,916

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